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E-News for ARL Directors

September 2010 E-News

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E-News for ARL Directors is a collaboration of ARL program staff, compiled and edited by Charles Lowry (clowry@arl.org) and Kaylyn Groves (kaylyn@arl.org).

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Governance and Membership Activities

1. ARL Membership to Convene in Washington, DC

2. ARL & CNI to Co-Host Fall Forum on Achieving Strategic Change in Research Libraries

Influencing Public Policies

3. ARL Joins Other Non-Profits in Bouchat v. Ravens Amicus Brief re Fair Use

4. Court Panel Rules Software Purchaser Cannot Resell under First Sale Doctrine

5. SPARC’s Open Access Week Challenge to You

6. Net Neutrality Developments: Google, Verizon Propose Compromise; FCC Requests Comments by Oct. 12

7. Appropriations Update: US Congress and Federal Agencies

8. OpenTheGovernment.org Releases Secrecy Report Card 2010

9. LC Launches National Digital Stewardship Alliance

10. National Academies to Develop Digital Copyright Research Agenda

11. National Academies Re-Assess America’s Competitiveness, Prescribe Innovation

Reshaping Scholarly Communication

12. ARL, SSP to Co-Sponsor Seminar on Partnering to Publish: Innovative Roles for Societies, Institutions, Presses, Libraries

13. ARL-ACRL Institute on Scholarly Communication Webinar to Address Staff Roles

14. SPARC Digital Repositories Meeting to Feature International Slate of Presenters

15. Sparky Awards Video Contest to Showcase Students' Call for Open Access

16. Open Access Week T–Shirts Now Available from SPARC

17. Chinese Libraries Issue Open Letter Protesting Journal-Price Hikes

18. Chronicle Addresses E-Books and Libraries

Transforming Research Libraries

19. ARL, Ithaka S+R Awarded IMLS Grant to Study Digitized Special Collections

20. OCLC Research Releases Report on Collaboration

21. CLIR Releases Report on Preservation of Recorded Sound

22. CDL Studies User Readiness for Mobile Services

23. CNI Update

Diversity, Professional Workforce, and Leadership Development

24. ARL Career Enhancement Program (CEP) Seeks Applications—Deadline Oct. 1

25. ARL Leadership & Career Development Program (LCDP) Calls for Applications, Career Coaches

26. Research Library Leadership Fellows (RLLF) Program Update

27. ALA Office for Diversity Seeks Applicants for “Discovering Librarianship” Recruitment Program—Deadline Oct. 1

Library Statistics and Assessment

28. ARL Annual Statistical Surveys Update

29. Value in Libraries: ARL Releases Special Issue of RLI on Assessing Organizational Performance

30. Impact Measures in Research Libraries, SPEC Kit 318, Published by ARL

31. Elsevier Releases Study of Academic Library’s Value to Grants Process

32. ACRL Releases Report on Value of Academic Libraries

Other Items of Interest to ARL Directors

33. Publications Recently Released by ARL

34. Grants

35. ARL Transitions

36. ARL Staff Transitions

37. Other Transitions


GOVERNANCE AND MEMBERSHIP ACTIVITIES

1. ARL Membership to Convene in Washington, DC

The ARL membership will convene in Washington, DC, at the 157th ARL Membership Meeting on October 13–14. The program theme is “Imperatives for Change.” Meeting folders were mailed to all ARL member library representatives on September 23. To view the committee and program schedule, visit the meeting website.

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2. ARL & CNI to Co-Host Fall Forum on Achieving Strategic Change in Research Libraries

Libraries are looking critically at every aspect of their organizations and developing innovative approaches to address the changing research, teaching, and learning needs of faculty and students. ARL-CNI Fall Forum attendees will gather October 14–15 in Washington, DC, immediately following the ARL Membership Meeting to consider and discuss “Achieving Strategic Change in Research Libraries.” The forum offers an array of sessions that will cover topics ranging from leadership and organizational realignment to models for services and collections. David E. Shulenburger, Vice President, Academic Affairs, Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, will present the keynote address. For more information about the program, visit the forum website.

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INFLUENCING PUBLIC POLICIES

3. ARL Joins Other Non-Profits in Bouchat v. Ravens Amicus Brief re Fair Use

On September 17, ARL—along with the American Library Association (ALA), the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), the International Documentary Association (IDA), and the WGBH Educational Foundation—joined an amicus brief asking for the full US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit to rehear the case of Bouchat v. Ravens and reconsider the panel’s flawed fair use reasoning. The case centers around a logo used from 1996 to 1998 by the Baltimore Ravens, which was later determined to infringe Frederick E. Bouchat’s copyrights. Bouchat has asked the court for the right to suppress every depiction of his logo, including historical depictions of the Baltimore Ravens in uniforms bearing the logo from 1996 to 1998. This decision could be quite significant. The Supreme Court has said that fair use is an essential First Amendment protection because it ensures that the copyright monopoly is not allowed to become a limitation on vital freedoms of expression. If courts decline to apply fair use to protect something as fundamental as the right to document historical facts, they upset the constitutional balance in copyright law. The “exclusive rights” of authors and inventors were never meant to give them a license to censor history. For more information on the Bouchat v. Ravens decision, visit ARL’s Policy Notes blog. You may also download the amicus brief from the ARL website.

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4. Court Panel Rules Software Purchaser Cannot Resell under First Sale Doctrine

A panel of the US Federal Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit issued an opinion on September 10 in the case of Timothy S. Vernor v. Autodesk Inc., holding that the software license agreement in this case was sufficient to make Vernor a licensee, not an owner, of AutoDesk software, and as a licensee Vernor was not entitled to re-sell the software. The first sale doctrine, codified as Section 109(a) of the Copyright Act, states that a lawful owner of a copy of a copyrighted work is free to resell, or otherwise dispose of, that copy without seeking permission from the rightsholder, but the doctrine only applies to owners, not licensees, of copyrighted works. The court’s opinion raises the possibility that, with the proper license language, any copyright holder could nullify the first sale doctrine and exercise extraordinary control over how copyrighted works are used. The court acknowledged policy concerns raised by this decision, including the possibility that sellers of books and music could use licenses to significantly impair the ability of libraries to obtain and circulate materials; while the court was sympathetic to these concerns, it said its reading of Ninth Circuit precedent required it to enforce the license agreement. Vernor’s attorney, Greg Beck of Public Citizen, has said that he will seek rehearing of this decision by the entire Ninth Circuit sitting en banc. Beck has also said that he expects the decision to be appealed to the US Supreme Court by whichever side loses at the next level of appeal. The Supreme Court has discretion to hear or deny the appeal, but may be interested to hear the case due to a possible split between the federal circuits on how to treat this issue. Because the first sale doctrine is a cornerstone of library practice, ARL joined the Electronic Frontier Foundation and others in an amicus brief in defense of the application of the doctrine in this case earlier this year. Download the amicus brief from the Library Copyright Alliance website. For more information, contact Prue Adler.

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5. SPARC’s Open Access Week Challenge to You

Open Access Week 2010

A recent SPARC webcast discussed the important opportunity presented by this year's Open Access Week (October 18–24) to surface evidence of how open access to research is transforming the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. Webcast participants explored examples, including a recent and rare move to share research data on Alzheimer's disease that led to important advances. SPARC challenges you to surface more of these stories—they need to be shared. Visit the Open Access Week website and help create the narrative of how open access to research is advancing the pace of discovery worldwide.

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6. Net Neutrality Developments

There have been two important developments in recent weeks regarding the ongoing negotiations over network neutrality and related telecommunications policies:

A. Google, Verizon Propose Compromise

In August, search giant Google (historically a key supporter of net neutrality) and network operator Verizon (historically a neutrality opponent) announced a compromise proposal for legislation. Their proposal would forbid Internet service providers (ISPs) from discriminating against Internet traffic over wired connections, but wireless Internet would continue to be unregulated. The Google-Verizon plan also describes a new category of services that would not be traditional access to the “public Internet,” but might involve access to Internet content or services over special, dedicated lines. This new category would be exempt from regulation under the proposal. Serious concerns were raised about the proposal, especially the failure to protect wireless Internet access and the proposal’s creation of a new unregulated category of service that could be used to circumvent neutrality rules. These objections make it increasingly unlikely that the proposal will be the basis for legislative action. When the proposal was unveiled, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced that its own efforts at finding a consensus among the various factions in the neutrality debate had fallen apart. The proposal is available via the Google Public Policy Blog.

B. FCC Requests Comments by October 12

In early September, the FCC issued a new Public Notice requesting more information on the two controversial issues raised by the Google-Verizon proposal: wireless networks and “specialized” services. The FCC seeks comment on the relationship between Internet access services and other broadband services that might travel on the same networks, i.e., “specialized services.” The notice lists some key concerns associated with these services—primarily that they will be used as a way to circumvent neutrality requirements—as well as some of the regulatory options available to the FCC to address those concerns. The notice also asks whether and how to apply neutrality rules to wireless networks. Comments are due October 12, and Reply Comments are due November 4. ARL will be filing comments on this notice. Download the notice from the FCC website..

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7. Appropriations Update: US Congress and Federal Agencies

A. US Congress

On September 30, Congress passed a continuing resolution funding federal agencies at the FY 2010 level until December 3. Despite a flurry of activity prior to the August recess, Congress did not pass any of the 12 appropriations bills for FY 2011 before the end of the current fiscal year, which ends at midnight September 30. Congress has adjourned for the November elections; they will reconvene on November 15, when they are expected to resume working on the FY 2011 budget.

B. Federal Agencies

With Congress focused on FY 2011 appropriations, federal agencies are drafting FY 2012 budget proposals. In June, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provided guidance to agencies concerning FY 2012 budget submissions. OMB requested that each non-security domestic agency submit a budget proposal that is 5% below the “discretionary total provided for that agency for FY 2012 in the FY 2011 Budget.” OMB also noted that agencies “should not simply reduce spending across the board,” agencies should eliminate “low-priority programs and activities.”

For more information, contact Prue Adler.

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8. OpenTheGovernment.org Releases Secrecy Report Card 2010

OpenTheGovernment.org—a coalition of over 70 groups including ARL that advocate for open government—recently released Secrecy Report Card 2010: Indicators of Secrecy in the Federal Government, a report on quantitative indicators of US government secrecy. The report details the continued decrease in most indicators of secrecy since the close of the Bush Administration while, at the same time, the report identifies rising backlogs in the declassification system. For example, in 2009, the number of new national security secrets declined by almost 10%, but over 6,000 requests for mandatory declassification review were carried over into 2010. The Secrecy Report Card presents data on classified information and classified costs, Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests, signing statements, use of state secrets, and more. Download the report from the OpenTheGovernment.org website.

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9. LC Launches National Digital Stewardship Alliance

The Library of Congress recently launched the National Digital Stewardship Alliance (NDSA), a partnership of institutions and organizations dedicated to preserving and providing access to selected databases, web pages, video, audio, and other digital content with enduring value. NDSA is an outgrowth of the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP). The alliance will focus on several goals, including developing improved preservation standards and practices; working with experts to identify categories of digital information that are most worthy of preservation; taking steps to incorporate content into a national collection; and providing national leadership for digital-preservation education and training. For more information, visit the NDSA website.

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10. National Academies to Develop Digital Copyright Research Agenda

The National Academies’ Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy has initiated a new project to “evaluate and propose how to expand and improve research on the impacts of copyright policy, particularly on innovation in the digital environment.” The work of the committee will entail identifying issues and experts, commissioning papers, organizing workshops, highlighting policy-relevant research questions that need attention, and recommending how public agencies and private institutions might support such research. A final report will be issued upon the project’s completion in September 2011. For more information, visit the project website.

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11. National Academies Re-Assess America’s Competitiveness, Prescribe Innovation

On September 23, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine released the e-version of Rising above the Gathering Storm, Revisited: Rapidly Approaching Category 5, a report that reviews the changes in America’s competitiveness position and innovation environment in the five years since the original Gathering Storm report was published. As noted by the authors, “[our] unanimous view…is that our nation’s outlook has worsened. While progress has been made in certain areas…the latitude to fix the problems being confronted has been severely diminished by the growth of the national debt over this period from $8 trillion to $13 trillion. Further, in spite of sometimes heroic efforts and occasional very bright spots, our overall public school system—or more accurately 14,000 systems—has shown little sign of improvement, particularly in mathematics and science. Finally, many other nations have been markedly progressing, thereby affecting America’s relative ability to compete effectively for new factories, research laboratories, administrative centers—and jobs…The only promising avenue for achieving this latter outcome, in the view of the Gathering Storm committee and many others, is through innovation…The recommendations made five years ago, the highest priority of which was strengthening the public school system and investing in basic scientific research, appear to be as appropriate today as then.” Download the report from the National Academies Press website.

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RESHAPING SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION

12. ARL, SSP to Co-Sponsor Seminar on Partnering to Publish: Innovative Roles for Societies, Institutions, Presses, Libraries

ARL is co-sponsoring a seminar with the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) on November 10 in Washington DC to provide research libraries, small society publishers, and federal agency librarians and research staff an opportunity to learn about current partnerships and explore new opportunities for cost-effective and innovative joint ventures. The all-day seminar will be held at the American Geophysical Union and is part of the annual SSP Fall Seminar series. For more information and to register, visit the SSP website.

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13. ARL-ACRL Institute on Scholarly Communication Webinar to Address Staff Roles

The next ARL-ACRL Institute on Scholarly Communication (ISC) webinar, “Broader Library Involvement in Building Programs—Librarian Training and Development,” will focus on the roles of librarians in education and outreach regarding scholarly communication. Speakers Karen Williams, Associate University Librarian for Academic Programs at University of Minnesota, and Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager for Scholarly Publishing and Licensing at MIT Libraries, will discuss how to prepare librarians to take on this challenge. They will also identify what tools and training are needed for librarians to speak confidently and answer questions about scholarly communications issues. This webinar will be held on October 19, 1:00–2:30 p.m. EDT. For more information and to register, visit the webinar website.

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14. SPARC Digital Repositories Meeting to Feature International Slate of Presenters

Leaders, innovators, and practitioners from North America, Europe, and Asia will test new frontiers in online open archives at the SPARC Digital Repositories Meeting to be held November 8–9, 2010, in Baltimore, Maryland. Four timely discussion tracks will bring together speakers with far-reaching experience: Repository-Based Publishing Strategies, Open Data, Global Repository Networks, and Making the Case for Financial Sustainability. These tracks will be supplemented with an Innovation Fair—where new technologies, strategies, and approaches will be highlighted—and a Sponsor Showcase. Register by October 24 and reserve your hotel room by October 25. For more information and to register, visit the meeting website.

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15. Sparky Awards Video Contest to Showcase Students' Call for Open Access

Sparky Awards 2011

“Open Up!”—the fourth annual Sparky Awards student video contest—calls on students to articulate their views of open access in a two-minute video. The contest has been embraced by campuses worldwide and has inspired imaginative expressions of support for the potential of open access to foster creativity, innovation, and problem solving. For more details, see the Sparky Awards website.

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16. Open Access Week T–Shirts Now Available from SPARC

Just in time for Open Access Week 2010, SPARC is making T–shirts available at cost. To ensure delivery by October 15, US orders should be placed by October 8 and international orders should be placed by October 1. For more information and to order, visit the Open Access Week website.

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17. Chinese Libraries Issue Open Letter Protesting Journal-Price Hikes

On September 1, a group of Chinese academic and research libraries took the unprecedented step of issuing an open letter challenging recent price increases posted by leading international scientific, technical, and medical (STM) publishers. The letter notes that the publishers are justifying the current move to raise journal access prices by more than 14% annually by citing their desire to raise the cost per article in China to a rate that equals the cost per article in North America and Europe—despite China's status as a developing country. The libraries point out that this move comes on the heels of years of double-digit price increases that have already taxed Chinese institutions' library budgets, which are currently facing caps and cuts similar to those in libraries around the world. The letter was signed by a roster of major Chinese institutions, and sends a strong signal that the Chinese library community is committed to acting collectively to protect the interest of the Chinese academy. Read the letter on the website of the National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

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18. Chronicle Addresses E-Books and Libraries

Two recent articles by Jennifer Howard in the Chronicle of Higher Education address libraries and the e-book market. The first, “Publishers Join Forces to Sell E-Books to Libraries,” summarizes current developments in the university press e-book environment (subscription required to login). In the second, “E-Books: What a Librarian Wants,” Howard interviews James Mouw, Assistant Director for Technical and Electronic Resources at the University of Chicago, who provides a library perspective.

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TRANSFORMING RESEARCH LIBRARIES

19. ARL, Ithaka S+R Awarded IMLS Grant to Study Digitized Special Collections

ARL, in partnership with Ithaka S+R, has been awarded a grant by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) National Leadership Grants program in the amount of $464,286 for a two-year study of how libraries, archives, and museums are creating sustainable digitized special collections. This study will provide actionable recommendations, best practices, and planning tools to help project leaders plan for sustaining their own special collections digitization projects. Building on past work by Ithaka S+R examining sustainability of digital resources done, activities under this cooperative agreement will include a survey of digitized special collections and focused interviews with leaders and project staff in selected cultural heritage organizations managing digitized special collections. The study’s final report of lessons learned, recommendations, and case studies will be freely shared through the partners’ websites, a webcast, and other mechanisms. For more information, see the ARL press release.

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20. OCLC Research Releases Report on Collaboration

OCLC Research has released a brief report by Günter Waibel, “Collaboration Contexts: Framing Local, Group, and Global Solutions,” offering a three-faceted framework for examining contexts for collaboration involving libraries, museums, and archives as partners. Waibel considers a collaboration continuum spanning efforts that employ local solutions, group solutions, and global solutions. The report provided a backdrop for the RLG Partnership-OCLC Research forum, “Yours, Mine, Ours: Leadership through Collaboration,” held at the Smithsonian Institution September 20–21, but it can provide a useful context for other conversations about collaboration. Download the report from the OCLC website..

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CLIR report: The State of Recorded Sound Preservation in the US

21. CLIR Releases Report on Preservation of Recorded Sound

The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) has released a book-length study, The State of Recorded Sound Preservation in the US, which was commissioned by the National Recording Preservation Board of the Library of Congress. The authors, Rob Bamberger and Sam Brylawski, consider a diversity of sources to examine a wide range of issues affecting enduring access to sound recordings. Chapters are devoted to preservation and public access issues, technical issues, training of professionals capable of preserving sound recordings, and copyright issues. Appendices expand the conversation to cover input from hearings and interviews of curators and users. The study concludes that major areas of America’s recorded sound heritage have already been destroyed or remain inaccessible to the public. This report lays the groundwork for the National Recording Preservation Plan that will be published by the Library of Congress later this year and will make specific recommendations for addressing the problems revealed in this report. Download the report from the CLIR website..

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22. CDL Studies User Readiness for Mobile Services

The California Digital Library (CDL) has released an internal report on a study of mobile-device users that was conducted this summer. The Mobile Strategy Report summarizes the insights gleaned from a set of surveys and interviews of various types of library users and librarians. Data were collected on device ownership, connectivity, and interest in performing a variety of activities using mobile devices. Finding that adoption of mobile technology has not yet reached a tipping point, the report recommends a number of preparatory activities, while stepping back from heavy investments in the development of standalone applications. Download the report from the University of California Office of the President website..

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23. CNI Update

A. Fall Membership Meeting to Be Held Dec. 13–14 in Arlington, VA

CNI's fall 2010 Membership Meeting will take place Dec. 13–14 in Arlington, Virginia. Clifford Lynch will present an overview of the 2010–11 CNI Program Plan, and Dan Cohen, Director of George Mason University's Center for History and New Media, will deliver the closing plenary address. Project briefing proposals will be accepted through October 22. The meeting registration deadline is November 12. For more information and for the latest updates, consult the meeting website.

B. CNI Conversations: September Podcast Now Online

In the September CNI Conversations podcast, CNI's Clifford Lynch discussed the National Science Foundation's (NSF) request for comments regarding challenges and opportunities for the social, behavioral, and economic sciences, and he reported on a meeting of the NSF Office of Cyberinfrastructure Campus Bridging Task Force. He also talked about the status of the UK Data Service and the Wolfram Data Summit. CNI's Joan Lippincott reported on the new EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) assessment project, Evidence of Impact. These monthly conference-call style discussions are open to individuals at CNI member institutions; to register for future calls, contact Jackie Eudell. To listen to the archived podcasts, visit the CNI Conversations website.

C. International Digital Curation Conference to Be Held Dec. 6–8 in Chicago

CNI is co-sponsoring the Sixth International Digital Curation Conference (IDCC) with the UK Digital Curation Centre and the Graduate School of Library and Information Science of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. This year’s conference will focus on “Participation and Practice: Growing the Curation Community through the Data Decade” and will be held in Chicago, Illinois, December 6–8, 2010. For more information and to register, visit the conference website.

For the Latest from CNI

CNI-ANNOUNCE: cni-announce-subscribe@cni.org
CNI News: http://news.cni.org/
Follow CNI: http://twitter.com/cni_org

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DIVERSITY, PROFESSIONAL WORKFORCE, AND LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

24. ARL Career Enhancement Program (CEP) Seeks Applications—Deadline Oct. 1

ARL is accepting applications for the Career Enhancement Program (CEP), which provides a six- to twelve-month internship in an ARL member library. The program seeks masters of library and information science (MLIS) students from traditionally underrepresented racial and ethnic minority groups who have successfully completed a minimum of 12 credit hours (or will complete 12 hours by the scheduled internship) in an ALA–accredited MLIS program. Applications are due October 1, 2010. For more details and to apply, see the press release.

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25. ARL Leadership & Career Development Program (LCDP) Calls for Applications, Career Coaches

A. Call for Nominations and Applications—Deadline Oct. 15

ARL is seeking nominations and applications for the 2011–12 Leadership and Career Development Program (LCDP). The LCDP is an 18-month fellowship program that prepares mid-career librarians from underrepresented racial and ethnic minority groups to take on increasingly demanding leadership roles in ARL libraries. The program addresses the need for research libraries to develop a more diverse professional workforce that can contribute to library success in serving the research, teaching, and learning of increasingly diverse scholarly and learning communities. For more information about the program requirements and application process, visit the LCDP website.

B. Call for Career Coaches

ARL invites directors and senior staff of member libraries to serve as Career Coaches for the 2011–12 Leadership and Career Development (LCDP) fellows. The objective of this 18-month commitment is to provide guidance to program fellows concerning leadership development and opportunities in research libraries (and in professional organizations) as well as insight into the major strategic initiatives and positioning of the Career Coach’s library. Online training will be provided to ensure a rich and rewarding experience. For more information about the program and to volunteer as a Career Coach, contact Mark A. Puente.

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26. Research Library Leadership Fellows (RLLF) Program Update

The 2009–10 class of the Research Library Leadership Fellows (RLLF) Program comes to a close at the ARL Membership Meeting on October 13–14 in Washington, DC, where the 21 graduating fellows will be recognized. Seven ARL libraries sponsored this class of fellows: Brigham Young, Florida, Georgia Tech, Houston, Michigan, Utah, and Western Ontario. The last major program experience for this class of fellows was the Strategic Issues Institute hosted by the University of Houston in late September.

Plans for the 2011–12 class of RLLF fellows continue to be made in collaboration with the sponsoring directors for the incoming class. The seven sponsoring libraries—British Columbia, Colorado at Boulder, Dartmouth, Illinois at Chicago, Miami, North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Northwestern—will provide 12 fellows and fellows for the remaining slots (up to 25) will be selected by the sponsoring directors with participation from ARL staff. Applications for the open slots will be available on the ARL website in mid-October. For the first time, applications for the program will be accepted from non-ARL member institutions—as well as from ARL institutions—for a select number of appointments to the program.

For more information about the program, visit the RLLF website.

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27. ALA Office for Diversity Seeks Applicants for “Discovering Librarianship” Recruitment Program—Deadline Oct. 1

The American Library Association (ALA) Office for Diversity and Spectrum Scholarship Program is offering an opportunity for early-career librarians to help recruit ethnically diverse high school and college students to careers in libraries. Discovering Librarianship: The Future is Overdue—a project funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)—will support the training of 35 early-career librarians to serve as recruiters in national, regional, and local career recruitment and education events. The application deadline is October 1, 2010. For more information about the program and the application process, visit the ALA website.

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LIBRARY STATISTICS AND ASSESSMENT

28. ARL Annual Statistical Surveys Update

The status of the annual ARL statistical surveys is as follows:

  • ARL Annual Salary Survey 2010–11: The mailing is available on the ARL website. Deadline: October 1.

  • ARL Statistics, Academic Health Sciences, Academic Law 2008–09: Data are final and readily accessible to ARL institutions via the “Analytics” tab at http://www.arlstatistics.org/ (login required; your library’s primary Statistics contact can approve your access to the system).

  • ARL Investment Index: Data were published in the Chronicle of Higher Education Almanac issue that was mailed on August 24 and are also available on the ARL Web site.

  • ARL Supplementary Statistics 2008–09: Data collection is closed and data are readily accessible via the “Analytics” tab and “Data Repository” link at http://www.arlstatistics.org/ (login required; your library’s primary Statistics contact can approve your access to the system).

  • ARL Preservation Statistics 2008–09: Data collection is closed and data are readily accessible via the “Analytics” tab and “Data Repository” link at http://www.arlstatistics.org/ (login required; your library’s primary Statistics contact can approve your access to the system).

The new surveys for the ARL Statistics, ARL Academic Health Sciences, Academic Law, and Supplementary Statistics are being prepared and will be made available shortly. The ARL Preservation Statistics is being discontinued. A meeting of the ARL Survey Coordinators and SPEC Liaisons will be held on January 7, 2011, in San Diego in conjunction with the ALA Midwinter Meeting. For more information about the annual surveys, contact Martha Kyrillidou.

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29. Value in Libraries: ARL Releases Special Issue of RLI on Assessing Organizational Performance

RLI 271 cover

ARL has published a special issue of Research Library Issues (RLI) on demonstrating library value by assessing organizational performance. The special issue focuses on ways in which ARL assessment tools help libraries improve their services and programs and prove their value to stakeholders. The articles cover several different applications of LibQUAL+®, the qualitative ARL library profiles, the ARL library scorecard pilot project, the Lib-Value project to measure the value and return on investment of academic libraries, and Measuring the Impact of Networked Electronic Services (MINES for Libraries®). The issue is freely available on the web.

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30. Impact Measures in Research Libraries, SPEC Kit 318, Published by ARL

SPEC Kit 318, Impact Measures in Research Libraries, explores the tools and methods that libraries use to gauge the difference they make for their user community, the topics assessment practitioners probe and the results they obtain, the effects of impact assessment, and whether institutions that publicize positive impact evidence see a difference in the level of financial or political support from their parent institutions. This SPEC Kit includes documentation from respondents in the form of impact assessment goals, user surveys, and calculations of library value. The table of contents and executive summary are freely available online; the full publication is available for purchase from ARL.

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31. Elsevier Releases Study of Academic Library’s Value to Grants Process

Elsevier has published the final report by Carol Tenopir on an international study of the value that academic libraries contribute to the grants process. The study, funded by Elsevier, expanded and tested an earlier case study conducted with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign that developed a methodology for calculating the library’s ROI to the university through grants received. This new study expanded that methodology to eight institutions in eight countries to determine if the methods are widely applicable in academic research libraries worldwide. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected, including surveys of faculty, interviews with university administrators, and data on grant proposals, grant income, and the library budget. The results demonstrate the value of the library to the institution in improving grant proposal and report writing and in helping to attract grant income. Library e-collections especially play a vital role in all aspects of grants, from proposal writing to final reports. The study also shows how specific factors within an institution (such as subject focus) or factors within a country (such as sources for grants funding) can influence the ROI for grants income. Expansion of this research to include other aspects of ROI—the Lib-Value project—is being conducted by principal investigators Carol Tenopir and Paula Kaufman in collaboration with ARL under sponsorship by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). Read the report on the Elsevier website.

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32. ACRL Releases Report on Value of Academic Libraries

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has published Value of Academic Libraries: A Comprehensive Research Review and Report, by Megan Oakleaf. The report is intended to help academic librarians raise awareness of the value of libraries and librarians among leaders in higher education, information technology, funding agencies, and campus decision making. Oakleaf reviews the literature, methodologies, and best practices currently in place for demonstrating the value of academic libraries and provides a roadmap for demonstrating the value of academic libraries in clear, measurable ways. Oakleaf is also presenting at the upcoming Library Assessment Conference in Baltimore, October 25–27, and she is a member of the Library Assessment Conference planning committee. Download the report from the ACRL website.

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OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST TO ARL DIRECTORS

33. Publications Recently Released by ARL

spec-318-cover

Impact Measures in Research Libraries, SPEC Kit 318
by Zsuzsa Koltay and Xin Li
This SPEC Kit explores research libraries’ use of impact measures to gauge the difference they make for their user community. This Kit also examines the various effects of impact assessment. Table of contents and executive summary freely available online; full publication available for purchase.

Research Library Issues (RLI), no. 271
Special Issue on Value in Libraries: Assessing Organizational Performance
This special issue of RLI focuses on ways in which ARL assessment tools help libraries improve their services and programs and demonstrate their value to stakeholders. Freely available online.

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34. Grants

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) announced that seven ARL members and ARL are receiving National Leadership Grants (NLG) this year. In addition to the grants announced this month, NLG collaborative planning grants were announced in the August E-news. The new NLG grants to ARL libraries and ARL are listed below. For more details, see the IMLS press release.

ARL, in partnership with Ithaka S+R
Award Amount: $464,286
Grant Category: Research
Contact: Karla Strieb, karla@arl.org
Project Title: "The Sustainability of Digital Special Collections"
See item #19 above for more information about this project.

Center for Research Libraries, in partnership with the Law Library Microfilm Consortium and the US Agricultural Information Network
Award Amount: $590,766; Matching: $662,912
Grant Category: Demonstration
Contact: Lizanne Payne, lpayne@crl.edu
Project Title: "Cooperative Print Archiving by Discipline: Developing an Infrastructure to Sustain Scholarly Resources"

Center for Research Libraries, in partnership with the American Antiquarian Society
Award Amount: $335,905; Matching: $336,171
Grant Category: Advancing Digital Resources
Contact: James Simon, jsimon@crl.edu
Project Title: "ICON Global Newspaper Directory to Enhance Collection Assessment"

Columbia, in partnership with ARTstor Inc. and other collaborators
Award Amount: $974,998; Matching: $1,079,299
Grant Category: Advancing Digital Resources
Contact: Carole Ann Fabian, caf2140@columbia.edu
Project Title: "Built Works Registry"

Michigan, in partnership with Michigan’s School of Information, HathiTrust, and Minnesota
Award Amount: $674,722; Matching: $288,739
Grant Category: Research
Contact: Paul Conway, pconway@umich.edu
Project Title: "Validating Quality in Large-Scale Digitization: Metrics, Measurement, and Use-Cases"

North Carolina State, in partnership with NCSU’s Distance Education and Learning Technology Applications and strategic consultant DEGW
Award Amount: $313,655; Matching: $314,230
Grant Category: Demonstration
Contact: Kristin Antelman, kristin_antelman@ncsu.edu
Project Title: "Developing a Model for Design of Next-Generation Learning Environments"

Pennsylvania
Award Amount: $200,002; Matching: $191,606
Grant Category: Demonstration
Contact: Joseph Zucca, zucca@upenn.edu
Project Title: "MetriDoc: A Technology Framework for Decision Support Services in Libraries"

Purdue, in partnership with Georgia Tech and Utah
Award Amount: $100,000; Matching: $36,135
Grant Category: Planning
Contact: James Mullins, jmullins@purdue.edu
Project Title: "Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success"

Vanderbilt Medical Center, in partnership with University Community Health Services Inc.
Award Amount: $421,737; Matching: $210,205
Grant Category: Research
Contact: Nunzia Giuse, nunzia.giuse@vanderbilt.edu
Project Title: "Using Patient Literacy Levels and Learning Style Preferences to Optimize the Delivery of Health Information"

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35. ARL Transitions

McGill: Colleen Cook has been appointed Trenholme Dean of Libraries, effective January 2011. She is currently Dean of University Libraries at Texas A&M. For more details, see the McGill website.

McMaster: Jeffrey Trzeciak has announced his resignation from the position of University Librarian to accept the position of Director of OhioLINK. For more information, visit the OhioLINK website.

Virginia Tech: Eileen Hitchingham announced her intention to retire from her position of Dean of University Libraries, effective February 1, 2011. For more details, see the Virginia Tech website.

Yale: Frank M. Turner, John Hay Whitney Professor of History, was named University Librarian for a five-year term beginning September 1, 2010. He served as Interim University Librarian since last January and as Director of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library since 2003. He served as Provost of the University from l988 to 1992. For more information, visit the Yale website.

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36. ARL Staff Transitions

Shaneka Morris was appointed Statistics Editorial Assistant, effective September 1, 2010. She recently earned her MSLS from the University of North Texas and was a 2008–10 ARL Diversity Scholar.

Kristen Riccard was named ARL Law and Policy Fellow, effective September 7, 2010. Her one-year assignment at ARL to work on public policy matters is being supported by the Washington DC law firm Ropes & Gray.

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37. Other Transitions

Association of American Universities (AAU): Robert M. Berdahl announced that he will retire from his position of AAU President, effective May 1, 2011, when his current contract expires. For more information, see the AAU website.

Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS): President Obama announced his intention to nominate Susan H. Hildreth as IMLS Director. She is currently the City Librarian of the Seattle Public Library and was previously appointed as California’s State Librarian by Governor Schwarzenegger. For more details, see the White House website.

National Science Foundation (NSF): The US Senate approved President Obama’s nomination of Subra Suresh, Dean of the MIT School of Engineering, to serve as the next Director of NSF for a six-year term. For more information, see the NSF press release.

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9/30/10

Charles B. Lowry
Executive Director
clowry@arl.org

Kaylyn Groves
Communications Program Officer
kaylyn@arl.org

Association of Research Libraries
21 Dupont Circle
Washington DC 20036
voice: (202) 296-2296
fax: (202) 872-0884


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