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E-News for ARL Directors

November-December 2010 E-News

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E-News for ARL Directors is a collaboration of ARL program staff, compiled and edited by Charles Lowry (clowry@arl.org) and Sarah Lippincott (slippincott@arl.org).

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Governance and Membership Activities

1. Future ARL Membership Meeting Dates

2. October Membership Meeting and Forum Proceedings Available

3. National Archives and Records Administration Becomes Newest Member of ARL

Influencing Public Policies

4. US Supreme Court Considers First Sale Case

5. ARL Comments on CCC Involvement in Georgia State Infringement Case

6. ARL Joins Amicus Brief on FOIA and Privacy Issues

7. FCC Poised to Act on Network Neutrality

8. LCA Files Comments re Impact of Government Internet Policies on Copyright & Innovation

9. ARL Joins CDT in Comments on Free Flow of Information on the Internet

10. Copyright Office to Conduct Study on Pre-1972 Sound Recordings

11. Senate Judiciary Committee Approves “Online Piracy” Legislation

12. Senate Passes Museum and Library Service Act

13. Video Distributor and Trade Association File Suit Against UCLA Over Video Streaming

14. Appropriations Update

Reshaping Scholarly Communication

15. ARL/SSP Partnering to Publish Seminar Presentations Available

16. SPARC Meeting Highlights Power of Repositories for Driving Open Access

17. SPARC-ACRL Forum to Examine Open-Access Journal Publishing

18. SPARC Supports the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR)

19. SPARC Showcases Families Supporting Open Access

20. Journal of Electronic Publishing Explores Future of the University Press

21. RLUK Calls for Pricing Restraint for Big Deals

22. JISC Report Assesses Cost of Peer Review

Transforming Research Libraries

23. ARL Releases Guide to NSF Data Sharing Policy

24. ARL Releases Archive of 2030 Scenarios Webcast

25. CARL-ABRC Releases Competencies for 21st-Century Librarians

26. Project Information Literacy Studies Student Information Use

27. CNI Update

Diversity, Professional Workforce, and Leadership Development

28. Registration Open for the 7th Annual ARL Leadership Symposium

29. ARL Selects Career Enhancement Program Fellows

30. ARL Selects 2011-2012 Leadership and Career Development Fellows

31. ALA Selects Field Recruiters for Discovering Librarianship Project

Library Statistics and Assessment

32. ARL Annual Statistical Surveys Update

33. ARL Survey Coordinators, SPEC Liaisons to Convene at ALA Midwinter

34. Library Assessment Conference Draws Nearly 500 Participants

35. ARL Balanced Scorecard Pilot Activities Reaching End

36. LibQUAL+® at ALA Midwinter: Training Sessions, Booth Consultations

37. 2011 International Events Related to Library Assessment

Other Items of Interest to ARL Directors

38. Publications

39. ARL Transitions

40. ARL Staff Transitions

41. Memorial


GOVERNANCE AND MEMBERSHIP ACTIVITIES

1. Future ARL Membership Meeting Dates

Dates are set for the 2011 ARL Membership Meetings. The 2011 Membership Meetings will be held May 3-6 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and October 11-14 in Washington, DC. A complete calendar of future Membership Meeting dates is available online.

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2. October Membership Meeting and Forum Proceedings Available

Audio and slide presentations of speakers from the October ARL Membership Meeting and ARL-CNI Forum, Achieving Strategic Change in Research Libraries are now available on the ARL website.

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National Archives

3. National Archives and Records Administration Becomes Newest Member of ARL

The membership of ARL voted in October to invite the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) to join as the 126th member. David S. Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, accepted the invitation. Located in Washington, DC, NARA serves American democracy by safeguarding and preserving the records of our Government, ensuring that the people can discover, use, and learn from this documentary heritage. NARA ensures continuing access to the essential documentation of the rights of American citizens and the actions of their government. It supports democracy, promotes civic education, and facilitates historical understanding of our national experience. For more information, visit the NARA website or see the ARL press release.

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INFLUENCING PUBLIC POLICIES

4. US Supreme Court Considers First Sale Case

On November 8, the US Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Costco v. Omega. The Library Copyright Alliance (LCA) believes this case could diminish the legal provision that allows libraries to lend books. Several Justices referred to an amicus brief filed before the US Supreme Court by the LCA. For example, Justice Breyer acknowledged a concern that libraries could import five copies of a work but not lend them. Omega, a luxury watch manufacturer, claims Costco infringed its copyrights by importing authentic Omega watches from abroad rather than buying them from the US distributor at a higher price.

The “first-sale doctrine” is the exception to the Copyright Act that allows any purchaser of a legal copy of a book or other copyrighted work to sell or lend that copy. However, the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled that the first-sale doctrine applied only to copies manufactured in the United States. In its friend of the court brief, LCA asks the Supreme Court to reverse the Ninth Circuit Court’s decision and apply the first-sale doctrine to all copies manufactured with the lawful authorization of the holder of a work’s US copyright. If a book does not specify that it was printed in the United States, a library would not know whether it could lend it without being exposed to a copyright lawsuit. Read the LCA's amicus brief.

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5. ARL Comments on CCC Involvement in Georgia State Infringement Case

CCC letter (November 2010 E-News)

On November 11, Charles B. Lowry, Executive Director of ARL, sent a letter to the President of the Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) expressing ARL’s concerns with the CCC’s decision to underwrite 50 percent of the legal fees of the three publishers in the copyright related litigation against Georgia State University.

The letter states, “As the CCC notes on its website, the not-for-profit organization was founded 'by a collaboration of content creators, content publishers, and content users.' The CCC also notes that it 'serves the interests of those who supply content as well as those who use it.' Balancing the interests of these communities can be a challenging task, and many efforts have been made over the years to that end with the understanding that collaboration is a far more successful strategy. Unfortunately, this action by the CCC signals to the content user community that the CCC no longer seeks to serve the interests of all of the partners in the scholarly communications enterprise.”

The letter asks that the CCC seriously reconsider its role and participation in litigation against members of the academic community. To read the full letter, visit the ARL website.

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6. ARL Joins Amicus Brief on FOIA and Privacy Issues

On November 16, ARL joined Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), and four other organizations in filing an amicus brief before the US Supreme Court concerning whether privacy protections under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) are applicable to corporations. The ruling in the case, Federal Communications Commission v. AT&T, will have a significant impact on government transparency and accountability. AT&T tried to block the disclosure of records concerning its contract work for the federal government, claiming that corporations have “personal privacy” rights and invoked FOIA exemptions.

The amicus brief argues that FOIA’s privacy provisions are designed to protect individuals, not corporate entities. As noted in the amicus brief, “recent events of national importance demonstrate how records obtained or created during government investigations into corporate activities can contain information of crucial public importance. For example, the BP oil rig explosion and resultant massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico—the subject of multiple FOIA requests—have already affected hundreds of thousands of residents and businesses and prompted numerous government investigations. The Department of Labor’s Mine Safety and Health Administration is investigating the myriad of alleged safety violations by Massey Coal and their connection to the company’s West Virginia mine where an explosion claimed the lives of 29 mine workers. The Securities and Exchange Commission launched multiple investigations into the $65 billion Ponzi scheme perpetrated by Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities, LLC. The public has a strong interest in knowing how the government is responding to these crises, whether the response is adequate, and what more should be done.” To download the amicus brief, visit the ARL website.

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7. FCC Poised to Act on Network Neutrality

Following five years of debate and discussion about how best to implement a network neutrality rule to regulate broadband Internet service providers, the Chairman of the FCC announced that he would circulate a proposed rule for consideration by the commission during its December 21 open meeting. This follows unsuccessful discussions in the House of Representatives to draft consensus legislation. Chairman Genachowski’s plan has several elements which would:

  • prohibit networks from blocking users’ right to access to lawful content and applications;
  • prevent wireline companies from engaging in “unreasonable discrimination,” and prevent wireless companies from blocking lawful websites; and
  • require transparency in network management practices for wireless and wireline providers.

A three person majority is required for a Commission rule to pass. Throughout these debates, ARL has worked closely with ALA and EDUCAUSE in addition to being a member of the Open Internet Coalition (OIC). Markham Erickson, Executive Director of the OIC stated, “The Open Internet Coalition has filed repeatedly in this docket over the past year, detailing what we believe are the necessary steps to keep the Internet open for innovation and choice. This is the first step in the process at the Commission toward satisfying President Obama's promise that his administration will adopt a network neutrality rule to protect innovation, consumer choice, and free expression on the Internet. We look forward to continuing to work with Chairman Genachowski and the other commissioners as they review this proposed order to ensure that the final order achieves the president’s goals.” For more information, contact Prue Adler prue@arl.org.

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8. LCA Files Comments re Impact of Government Internet Policies on Copyright & Innovation

On December 10, the Library Copyright Alliance (LCA) filed comments in regard to a notice of inquiry (NOI) from the Department of Commerce. The comments focused on a broad range of topics related to the impact of restrictions on the free flow of information on the Internet on innovation, global economic growth, trade, and investment. LCA outlines three points: first, when considering the liability for Internet service providers, policymakers must bear in mind that libraries function as Internet service providers for underserved populations; second, libraries have learned that the key for institutions to survive in the face of changing technology is not for the institutions to try to change user behavior, but instead for the institutions to adapt to user demand; and third, the federal government can most effectively promote creativity and innovation in the Internet Economy by encouraging the use of open licensing models and by requiring access to the results of federally funded research.

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9. ARL Joins CDT in Comments on Free Flow of Information on the Internet

ARL and ALA endorsed comments filed by the Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT) in response to a Department of Commerce notice of inquiry (NOI) regarding the free flow of information on the Internet. The NOI raised a lengthy list of questions to better understand how restrictions on the free flow of information could impact innovation, economic development, global trade, and investment and how best to address these negative impacts. In the filing, the organizations noted that, “The global Internet has also become a vibrant and essential platform for economic and educational activity, enabled by the same intermediary liability protections that have supported its development as an unprecedented medium for the free flow of information. When intermediaries are protected from liability for their users’ content, they are freer to innovate new products and services, which often serve as additional platforms for small innovators and individual speakers to offer content, services, or applications. The Internet has unleashed a wave of innovation driven by small inventors and entrepreneurs, generating an enormous amount of economic value. Moreover, libraries and educational institutions are prolific providers of content, services, and applications via the Internet and rely on the Internet to collaborate and to obtain and provide services to students, researchers, and members of the public.” CDT, ARL, and ALA also provided recommendations on how the Department of Commerce could implement policies that promote the free flow of information. Download the filing from the ARL website.

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10. Copyright Office to Conduct Study on Pre-1972 Sound Recordings

The US Copyright Office has been directed by Congress to “conduct a study on the desirability and means of bringing sound recordings” produced before February 15, 1972, under Federal jurisdiction. Currently, such sound recordings are protected under a patchwork of State statutory and common laws from their date of creation until 2067. The Office seeks comments on the likely effect of Federal protection upon preservation of and public access to these sound recordings, and the impact of federal coverage of pre-1972 sound recordings on the economic interests of rightsholders. Finally, the Office seeks comments on how the incorporation of pre-1972 sound recordings into Federal law might best be achieved.

Initial written comments are due to the Office of General Counsel of the Copyright Office no later than January 31, 2011. Reply comments must be received in the Office of the General Counsel of the Copyright Office no later than March 2, 2011.

For more information, view the full notice of inquiry.

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11. Senate Judiciary Committee Approves “Online Piracy” Legislation

On November 18, the US Senate Committee on the Judiciary unanimously approved legislation targeted at combating “online piracy and counterfeiting.” Known as COICA or the “Combating Online Infringements and Counterfeits Act,” the bill seeks to limit digital piracy by, in part, giving the US Attorney General the ability to shutter websites where copyright infringement is believed to be “central to the activity.” Several members of the Committee noted that changes would be required prior to the bill being considered by the full Senate. A wide range of individuals, organizations, and public and private sector entities voiced deep opposition to the bill.

Concerns range from censorship and curtailing free speech to thwarting technological innovation. For example, the ACLU, Human Rights Watch, Reporters Without Borders, and other human rights organizations issued a letter noting that the legislation could have grave repercussions for global human rights. “[T]he human rights community has strongly condemned countries that use the tactics proposed in COICA to take down content for a site’s global user base…. COICA would stand for the proposition that countries have the right to insist on removal of content from the global Internet in service to the exigencies of domestic law. Nothing in principle would limit application of this approach solely to copyright infringement.” Many prominent internet engineers also wrote in opposition to members of the Senate Judiciary Committee and noted, “If enacted, this legislation will risk fragmenting the Internet’s global domain name system (DNS), create an environment of tremendous fear and uncertainty for technological innovation, and seriously harm the credibility of the United States in its role as a steward of key Internet infrastructure.”

For more information, read the article from Wired.com.

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12. Senate Passes Museum and Library Service Act

On December 14, the House passed S. 3984, the Museum and Library Service Act (MLSA). The Senate had passed S. 3984 on December 7 by unanimous consent. On December 1, the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) had unanimously approved the nomination of Susan Hildreth to be the director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). For more information, contact Prue Adler prue@arl.org.

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13. Video Distributor and Trade Association File Suit Against UCLA Over Video Streaming

On December 7, the Association for Information Media and Equipment (AIME) and Ambrose Video Publishing (AVP) filed suit against the Regents and Chancellor of UCLA in federal court, claiming that UCLA’s video streaming program violates copyright and contract law. AIME had raised its legal concerns with UCLA over a year ago, complaining that UCLA could not legally transfer films from DVD onto campus servers and make them available to students electronically. UCLA suspended its streaming operations for a brief period in response, but recommenced streaming in March 2010. UCLA streams videos on a password protected site that makes videos available only to students enrolled in classes for which they have been assigned. UCLA has said its practices are permissible under the copyright limitations and exceptions described in Sections 107 (fair use), 110(1) (classroom teaching), and 110(2) (digital distance education) of the Copyright Act. AIME and AVP contradict these claims in their complaint.

The complaint names the Regents and Chancellor rather than the institution because UCLA, as a state institution, is protected by state sovereign immunity. Interestingly, the complaint asks for money damages, which are also barred by sovereign immunity.

Prompted in part by this controversy, ARL and the Library Copyright Alliance have published two relevant documents. First, Jonathan Band, Kenneth Crews, Peter Jaszi, and Brandon Butler prepared an issue brief for the Library Copyright Alliance entitled “Streaming Films for Educational Purposes,” available for download on the LCA website. Second, an article entitled “Urban Copyright Legends” by Brandon Butler in the June 2010 issue of Research Library Issues addressed some popular misconceptions about copyright law that had been repeated in debates over UCLA’s streaming policy.

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14. Appropriations Update

Following actions by the US House of Representatives and the US Senate, on December 4, President Obama signed into law H.J.Res. 101, which provides FY 2011 appropriations for the Federal Government through December 18, 2010. This funding continues at the FY 2010 level. It is not clear at this point whether the US Congress will attempt to pass an omnibus FY 2011 appropriations bill or pass another continuing resolution to keep the US Government operating. For more information, contact Prue Adler prue@arl.org.

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RESHAPING SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION

15. ARL/SSP Partnering to Publish Seminar Presentations Available

Partnering to publish (November 2010 E-News)

ARL jointly co-sponsored a seminar with the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) on November 10 to share information about current partnerships between librarians and publishers in an environment where traditional roles are changing. Panelists from a variety of institutions provided overviews of current collaborative activities and addressed new editorial, production, and marketing roles. The presentations and video are now available online.

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16. SPARC Meeting Highlights Power of Repositories for Driving Open Access

On December 9, SPARC released summaries, slides, and video from the 2010 Digital Repositories Meeting hosted jointly by SPARC, SPARC Japan/NII, and SPARC Europe. The SPARC digital repositories meetings have played an integral part in advancing the potential of open online repositories to expand the dissemination of scholarship and transform scholarly communication. The 2010 meeting set forth to explore four key trends: repository-based publishing strategies, global repository networks, open data, and making the case for financial sustainability. These panel discussions were supplemented with an Innovation Fair, where new technologies, strategies, and approaches were highlighted, and a Sponsor Showcase. Summaries, plus slides and selected video, are now available through the SPARC website.

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17. SPARC-ACRL Forum to Examine Open-Access Journal Publishing

At the upcoming meeting of the American Library Association (ALA) in San Diego, SPARC and ACRL will co-host a timely panel discussion on “Marketplace: Open Access and the Changing State of Scholarly Publishing.” The forum will be held Saturday, January 8, 2011, from 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the San Diego Convention Center, Room 29A. See the SPARC website for more information.

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18. SPARC Supports the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR)

SPARC and the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) share a common view that there are significant benefits for researchers and society to improving the visibility, dissemination, and reuse of research results. One way of achieving this is through the implementation of open access repositories. These repositories, when interoperable, form the basis of a global network of open access content. Read SPARC's statement of support.

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19. SPARC Showcases Families Supporting Open Access

Open families (November 2010 E-News)

SPARC is showcasing the stories of two exceptional families who have embraced Open Access as a value and have advanced their own work―though not always without reservations. The personal stories of brothers Jonathan and Michael Eisen (both evolutionary biologists), along with Neil Buckholtz and his son, Josh (neuroscientists), grappling with the pros and cons of open access are now profiled on the SPARC website.

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20. Journal of Electronic Publishing Explores Future of the University Press

The November issue of the Journal of Electronic Publishing focuses on the broad theme of “Reimagining the University Press.” The articles address how digital technologies will support a more extensive and diverse set of publications. Many discuss the constraints of the current scholarly communication system and the challenges of the present economic climate, and articulate the importance of collaboration and institutional alignment. The entire issue is freely available online.

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21. RLUK Calls for Pricing Restraint for Big Deals

At its recent conference, Research Libraries UK (RLUK) issued a press release stating that it would not support future big deals unless there were real price reductions. The story was reported in the November 25 edition of the Wall Street Journal online (requires log-in) and the November 26 print edition. A related story about the high cost of journals appeared in Times Higher Education. Read ARL’s own statement about the effect of the economic climate on library subscriptions, published in February 2009.

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22. JISC Report Assesses Cost of Peer Review

In November, JISC Collections released the report "The Value of UK HEIs Contribution to the Publishing Process: Summary Report," examining the non-cash costs of peer-review and academic activities as editors and editorial board members. The report is intended to provide academic administration with an understanding of the size of the non-cash costs and their importance to research. It also provides insight that will inform JISC Collections' relationships with publishers. Read the press release on the JISC website.

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TRANSFORMING RESEARCH LIBRARIES

23. ARL Releases Guide to NSF Data Sharing Policy

ARL has released a new web-based resource that unpacks the recently announced NSF Data Sharing Policy and offers links to resources developed by librarians to support researchers in meeting the policy’s data management requirements. The NSF policy, which goes into effect in January 2011, requires researchers to submit data management plans as part of their grant proposals. The Guide for Research Libraries: The NSF Data Sharing Policy, by Patricia Hswe and Ann Elisabeth Holt, reviews the policy, explains its implications for research libraries, and provides resources for communicating with researchers about data management and funder policies and educating researchers in the basics of developing data management plans. The site is a dynamic resource collection that will be updated as libraries continue to develop resources to support this activity. To promote information sharing among librarians advancing data management activities, ARL has also launched a Google group for library-based data management professionals.

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24. ARL Releases Archive of 2030 Scenarios Webcast

ARL has released the archived version of "An Introduction to Using the ARL 2030 Scenarios for Research Library Planning," the free webcast held November 4, 2010. The 90-minute session introduced the ARL 2030 Scenarios: A User’s Guide for Research Libraries and highlighted the ways in which leaders and planners can use the scenarios to enhance their own thinking about the dynamics that shape the future of research libraries and how to integrate scenario-planning techniques into their libraries’ planning activities.

Viewers of the archive will receive an overview of the ARL 2030 Scenario set and some of its strategic implications for libraries, along with a review of the contents of the user’s guide, and options for integrating scenario planning into organizations with different planning strategies and timelines. The archive also includes an audience Q&A with the three presenters. The archive is freely available with registration.

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25. CARL-ABRC Releases Competencies for 21st-Century Librarians

Core competencies (November 2010 E-News)

On October 29, CARL-ABRC released “Core Competencies for 21st Century CARL Librarians,” which provides librarians and library leaders with a rich resource offering a model for considering librarian competencies within a national framework. The competencies described include: fundamental knowledge, interpersonal skills, leadership and management, collections development, information literacy, and information technology skills. A bibliography is also provided. The report is freely available on the CARL website.

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26. Project Information Literacy Studies Student Information Use

The latest report from the University of Washington’s Project Information Literacy studies how students find information for course assignments and how they evaluate the resources they find. “How College Students Evaluate and Use Information in the Digital Age,” by Alison J. Head and Michael B. Eisenberg, reports findings from a survey of more than 8,000 students from 25 US college campuses. Recommendations are made for librarians and other campus stakeholders seeking to work together to improve pedagogy. The report is freely available at the Project Information Literacy website.

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27. CNI Update

A. Fall Membership Meeting

CNI's fall 2010 Membership Meeting took place December 13-14 in Arlington VA. CNI Executive Director Clifford Lynch presented an overview of the 2010-11 CNI Program Plan during the meeting's opening plenary session, and Professor Daniel Cohen, Director of the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, presented the talk The Ivory Tower and the Open Web as the meeting's closing plenary address. Consult the meeting Web site for details, including descriptions of project briefings and a meeting schedule. The new CNI Program Plan will be available following the meeting. The Twitter hashtag for this event is #cni10f.

B. CNI Conversations: November Podcast Now Online

During the November 2010 session of CNI Conversations, CNI Executive Director Clifford Lynch previews the plenary sessions and some of the project briefings to be presented at the upcoming CNI Fall Membership Meeting. He also discusses the 2011 Personal Digital Archiving Conference, and LC's recent invitational NDIIPP meeting on citizen journalism. Joan Lippincott reports on the PKAL Learning Spaces Collaboratory. Questions include a recent New York Times article on digital humanities and the recent Internet2 meeting.

These monthly conference-call style discussions are open to individuals at CNI member institutions. The next call will take place December 16, 1:00-2:00 p.m. EST. To register for the December call, contact Jackie Eudell jackie@cni.org. To listen to the archived podcasts, visit the CNI Conversations website.

For the Latest from CNI

CNI-ANNOUNCE: cni-announce-subscribe@cni.org
CNI News: http://news.cni.org/
Follow CNI: http://twitter.com/cni_org

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DIVERSITY, PROFESSIONAL WORKFORCE, AND LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

28. Registration Open for the 7th Annual ARL Leadership Symposium

ARL will host its 7th Annual Leadership Symposium for master of library and information science (MLIS) students on Saturday and Sunday, January 8 and 9, 2011 in San Diego, CA. The Leadership Symposium curriculum focuses on topics related to the major strategic areas of ARL, as well as transitioning into, and building career networks in, research libraries. The program will include presentations from ARL program officers as well as human resource professionals in ARL member libraries. Registration for the symposium is open to any MLIS student with an interest in a career in research libraries. The event is free of charge. For more information on the Leadership Symposium and a link to the registration form, visit the ARL website.

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29. ARL Selects Career Enhancement Program Fellows

The ARL Career Enhancement Program (CEP) Coordinating Committee has selected 19 fellows to participate in the third and final year of this competitive fellowship program. The CEP, funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and ARL member libraries, gives master of library and information science (MLIS) students from underrepresented groups an opportunity to jump-start their careers in research libraries by providing a robust fellowship experience that includes an internship in an ARL member library. This program reflects the commitment of ARL members to create a diverse research library community that will better meet the challenges of changing demographics in higher education and the emphasis on global perspectives in the academy.

The 2011 Career Enhancement Program fellows are:

  • Anjali Bhasin, University of Texas at Austin
  • Felipe Castillo, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Steven Chong, San Jose State University
  • LeNesha DeBardelaben, Indiana University
  • Mariaelena de la Rosa, University of Arizona
  • Hoan-Vu Do, San Jose State University
  • Valerie Enriquez, Simmons College
  • Jennifer Garrett, University of British Columbia
  • Don Jason, Kent State University
  • Charlene Johnson, North Carolina Central University
  • Kelly Lau, University of British Columbia
  • Cynthia Orozco, San Jose State University
  • Holly Nguyan, San Jose State University
  • Karla Nielsen, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Joung Park, University of Wisconsin at Madison
  • Ashley Rayner, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Denise Zacker, University of South Florida
  • Shirley Zhao, Long Island University
  • Yanjuan Zou, Univeristy of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

For more information about the CEP, visit the ARL website.

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30. ARL Selects 2011-2012 Leadership and Career Development Fellows

The selection committee from ARL’s Committee on Diversity and Leadership has selected 19 fellows to participate in the 2011-2012 Leadership and Career Development Program (LCDP). The LCDP is an 18-month fellowship program to prepare mid-career librarians from traditionally underrepresented racial and ethnic minority groups to take on increasingly demanding leadership roles in ARL libraries. The LCDP addresses the need for research libraries to develop a more diverse professional workforce that can contribute to library success in serving the research, teaching, and learning of increasingly diverse scholarly and learning communities.

The 2011-2012 LCDP Fellows are:

  • Michelle Baildon, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Angela Boyd, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Nikhat Ghouse, University of Kansas
  • LaVerne Gray, Texas A & M University
  • Amy Harper, University of Washington
  • Martin Knott, University of Michigan
  • Ranny Lacanienta, Brigham Young University
  • Annette Marines, University of California, Santa Cruz
  • Charlene Maxey-Harris, University of Nebraska at Lincoln
  • G. Salim Mohammed, University of Hawaii
  • Alanna Aiko Moore, University of California, San Diego
  • Leslie Morgan, Hesburgh Libraries of Notre Dame
  • Alexandra Rivera, University of Michigan
  • Lisa Shiota, Library of Congress
  • Tito Sierra, North Carolina State University
  • Yunah Sung, University of Michigan
  • Billie Walker, Pennsylvania State University
  • Annie Wu, University of Houston
  • Marlo Maldonado Young, University of California, San Diego

For more information on the ARL LCDP, visit the ARL website.

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31. ALA Selects Field Recruiters for Discovering Librarianship Project

The American Library Association’s Office for Diversity and Spectrum Scholarship Program have selected several past participants in ARL's Diversity and Leadership Programs as field recruiters for the Discovering Librarianship project—a recruitment initiative focused on introducing ethnically diverse high school and college students to careers in libraries.

Discovering Librarianship: The Future is Overdue, a project funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), will support the training of 35 early career librarians to serve as recruiters in national, regional and local career recruitment and education events. The program intends to significantly increase the profession’s capacity to recruit high school and college students, provide the profession with a new set of recruitment materials with which to engage a growing and diverse population, and deliver valuable information and support to high school and college students interested in library careers.

Past ARL program participants chosen to participate are:

  • Marissa Alcorta, 2005-2007 ARL Diversity Scholar
  • Roy Brooks, 2009-2010 ARL Diversity Scholar
  • Patricia Hswe, 2006-2008 ARL Diversity Scholar
  • Jessica Kayongo, 2009-2010 Leadership and Career Development Fellow
  • Yani Yancey, 2009 ARL Career Enhancement Program Fellow

For additional information on the Discovering Librarianship Program, visit the ALA website.

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LIBRARY STATISTICS AND ASSESSMENT

32. ARL Annual Statistical Surveys Update

The status of the annual ARL statistical surveys is as follows:

  • ARL Annual Salary Survey 2010–11: Data are currently being compiled and analyzed. We expect to receive all the data by December 23. The mailing is available on the ARL website.
  • ARL Statistics, Academic Health Sciences, Academic Law 2009–10: Data are currently being compiled and analyzed. The deadline for submitting data was October 15. The mailing is available on the ARL website.
  • ARL Supplementary Statistics 2009–10: Data are currently being compiled and analyzed. The deadline for submitting data was October 15. The mailing is available on the ARL website.
  • All data are readily accessible via the “Analytics” tab and “Data Repository” link at http://www.arlstatistics.org/ (login required; your library’s primary Statistics contact can approve your access to the system). The ARL Preservation Statistics is being discontinued with future work in this area focusing on the development of a vision for 21st-century research library collections that will address strategic directions for preservation activities.

For more information about the annual surveys, contact Martha Kyrillidou martha@arl.org.

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33. ARL Survey Coordinators, SPEC Liaisons to Convene at ALA Midwinter

In conjunction with the upcoming ALA Midwinter Meeting, a meeting of the ARL Survey Coordinators and SPEC Liaisons will be held on January 7, 2011, from 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., in the San Diego Convention Center, Room 28A. The discussion will focus on the upcoming work of the Task Force on Reviewing the ARL Statistics, the ARL Supplementary Statistics and ARL Annual Salary Survey. Gordon Fretwell has agreed to serve as consultant to the ARL Statistics and Assessment Committee to move this work forward. People planning to attend the meeting are invited to come prepared to address the following questions:

  1. Regarding the Annual Salary Survey:
    a) Are there job categories that no longer make sense, either by their definition or the number of staff to whom the categories apply? Which ones?
    b) Are there new job categories that you feel are needed in order to adequately describe work being done as research libraries transition to their future state? How do you describe them?
  2. Regarding the annual Library Statistics compilation:
    a) Are you asked to report statistics, which you feel are meaningless in research libraries as they transition to their future state? Which ones? Are you also asked to report them to the federal ALS survey (Statistics Canada for Canadian libraries)?
    b) Are there new statistics/metrics that are helpful to describe the transition research libraries are making, which are not collected currently? What are they/how would you describe them?
  3. Regarding Special Collections (If convenient, please discuss this with either the Head(s) of Special Collections and/or the Director of the Library prior to midwinter):
    a) With specific regard to special collections (however organized within your library), do you feel the single statistic now collected (linear feet of manuscripts) is adequate?
    b) What metrics do you feel can contribute to a broader picture of their breadth, size, use and intellectual/scholarly importance?

For more information, contact Martha Kyrillidou martha@arl.org.

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34. Library Assessment Conference Draws Nearly 500 Participants

The 2010 Library Assessment Conference, held October 25–27 in Baltimore, drew nearly 500 participants. As one of the themes of the conference was "Library As Place," the Peabody Library provided an ideal backdrop for the conference reception on Oct. 26. The opening poster reception on Oct. 25 showcased 80 posters, including 12 that received the Judges' Choice Award. To view posters and slides, visit the conference website. David Shulenburger from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities spoke on "The Relationship Between University Assessment and Library Assessment". Keynote papers by Fred Heath, Danuta Nitecki, Megan Oakleaf, Stephen Town and Joe Matthews are also being published as the January issue of Library Quarterly and are available in preprint format. Audio and proceedings of the full papers will be available early in 2011. Planning is underway for the 2012 Library Assessment Conference to be held in Charlottesville, Virginia, during the fall season. For more information, visit the conference website.

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35. ARL Balanced Scorecard Pilot Activities Reaching End

Scorecard (November 2010 E-News)

A variety of presentations at the ARL/CNI Forum and the Library Assessment Conference in Baltimore featured the ARL Balanced Scorecard Pilot Activities, capturing the rich learning and engaging work that has taken place. Four ARL libraries in North America participated in the ARL Library Scorecard Pilot (Johns Hopkins, McMaster, U of Virginia and the U of Washington), based on the Balanced Scorecard framework created by Harvard business professors Robert S. Kaplan and David P. Norton. The scorecard allows users to examine current and future performance based on four balanced perspectives (the user, staff learning and growth, internal processes, and financial health). McMaster recently unveiled a new strategic plan based on the Balanced Scorecard model through a press release available on their website.

Listen to audio from the panel presentation “Balanced Scorecard: A Framework for Strategic Change” featuring the work of the four libraries on the ARL website.

Slides from the presentation “Building Scorecards in Academic Research Libraries: Organizational Issues and Measuring Performance,” are also available for download on the ARL website. Both audio and the final paper will be published on the conference website in the coming weeks.

ARL is working with Ascendant Strategy Management and the four pilot libraries in designing the next phase of the Balanced Scorecard ARL activities. A call of participation for a new cohort of libraries for a collaborative learning, development, and implementation process is forthcoming. If interested, please contact Martha Kyrillidou martha@arl.org.

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36. LibQUAL+® at ALA Midwinter: Training Sessions, Booth Consultations

The LibQUAL+® team is offering the following events in conjunction with the ALA Midwinter Meeting in San Diego, California, January 2011:

LibQUAL+® Training 
Monday, January 10 (Register online)

  • Survey Introduction 
8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.
  • Survey Administration 
10:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m.
  • Survey Results 
2:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

LibQUAL+® Consultations: San Diego Convention Center, LibQUAL+® Booth #1030

  • Friday, January 7, 5:30–7:30 p.m. 

  • Saturday–Sunday, January 8-9, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. 

  • Monday, January 10, 9:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

Contact the LibQUAL+® team to schedule a consultation.

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37. 2011 International Events Related to Library Assessment

9th Northumbria International Conference on Performance Measurement in Libraries and Information Services

22-25 August, 2011, University of York, England, UK

6th Evidence Based Library and Information Practice (EBLIP6)

27-30 June, 2011, University of Salford, England, UK

3rd Quantitative and Qualitative Methods for Libraries (QQML) 2011 International Conference

spec-320-cover

24-27 May, 2011, Athens, Greece

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OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST TO ARL DIRECTORS

38. Publications Recently Released by ARL

Core Benefits, SPEC Kit 320
By Brian W. Keith This SPEC Kit explores the core employment benefits of retirement, and life, health, and other insurance —benefits that are typically decided by the parent institution and often have significant governmental regulation. Download the table of contents and executive summary or purchase a bound copy of the complete SPEC Kit from ARL.

Research Library Issues (RLI), no. 272
This issue of RLI features articles on developing a workforce for 21st-century research libraries. Freely available online.

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39. ARL Transitions

California, Davis: Randolph M. Siverson, a distinguished professor emeritus and research professor of political science, was appointed Acting University Librarian, effective December 1, 2010. He came out of retirement to assume administration of the General Library from Helen Henry and Gail Yokote, who served as Acting Co-University Librarians since January 2009, when then-University Librarian Marilyn Sharrow went on leave. Sharrow retired as University Librarian Emerita in March 2010.

Harvard: Nancy M. Cline announced her intention to retire from the position of Roy E. Larsen Librarian of Harvard College, effective at the end of this academic year.

Texas A&M: Charles Gilreath, Executive Associate Dean of University Libraries, was named Interim Dean of Libraries, effective December 1, 2010. Dean of Libraries Colleen Cook has been appointed Trenholme Dean of Libraries at McGill University, effective January 2011.

Utah: Joyce L. Ogburn’s title has changed from University Librarian and Director of the J. Willard Marriott Library to Dean of the J. Willard Marriott Library and University Librarian.

Yale: Jon Butler, the Howard R. Lamar Professor of American Studies, History, and Religious Studies, and former Dean of the Graduate School, has been appointed Acting University Librarian, effective December 1, 2010.

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40. ARL Staff Transitions

Sarah Lippincott joined the ARL staff as a Communications Program Associate, effective November 30, 2010, while Kaylyn Groves is on maternity leave.

Lindsay Sarin joined the ARL staff as a Program Assistant, effective November 30, 2010. She is currently an MLS student at the University of Maryland.

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41. Memorial

Frank M. Turner, 1944–2010
Frank M. Turner, Yale University Librarian, John Hay Whitney Professor of History, and former University Provost, died of a pulmonary embolism on November 11 at the age of 66. Turner earned his BA in history with highest honors from the College of William and Mary in 1966. He earned his PhD in 1971 from Yale and began teaching there full-time that year. He served as University Provost from 1988 to 1992, Director of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library since 2003, and Interim University Librarian from January 2010 to September, when he was named University Librarian in September 2010. His scholarly work in modern European intellectual history focused on Victorian life and thought. See the Yale Daily News obituary published on September 12.

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12/15/10

Charles B. Lowry
Executive Director
clowry@arl.org

Sarah Lippincott
Communications Program Associate
slippincott@arl.org

Association of Research Libraries
21 Dupont Circle
Washington DC 20036
voice: (202) 296-2296
fax: (202) 872-0884


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