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E-News for ARL Directors

May 2010 E-News

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E-News for ARL Directors is a collaboration of ARL program staff, compiled and edited by Charles Lowry (clowry@arl.org) and Kaylyn Groves (kaylyn@arl.org).

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Governance and Membership Activities

1. ARL Membership Convenes in Seattle

2. University of Ottawa Becomes Newest Member of ARL

3. ARL Board Convenes, Takes Action

Influencing Public Policies

4. ARL Joins EFF in Amicus Brief on DMCA Safe Harbor in Viacom v. YouTube

5. Supreme Court to Hear First-Sale Doctrine Case, Costco v. Omega

6. Court of Appeals Strikes Down Order Suppressing Allegedly Infringing Book

7. ARL Joins in ACTA Analysis

8. CCIA Releases Study on Fair Use in the US Economy

9. Federal Research Public Access Act Introduced in US House of Representatives

10. NSF to Require Data-Management Plans with Grant Proposals

11. Court Rules on FCC Authority; FCC to Take “Third Way” on Internet Regulation

12. Appropriations Update

13. ARL Joins in Letter to DOD re Transparency in Nuclear Weapons Policy

14. Faster FOIA Legislation Passes US Senate

15. ISOO Releases 2009 Classification Report

16. Audit Reveals Wide Variation in Agency Open-Government Plans

17. NEH Announces $16 Million in Awards & Offers for Humanities Projects

18. Preserving the American Historical Record Act Introduced in US Senate

Reshaping Scholarly Communication

19. Strategies for Opening Up Content: Special Issue of RLI Released

20. Scholarly Communication Trends in China: Audio & Slides from Membership Meeting Available

21. University Press Collaborations for E-Book Delivery: Slides from Membership Meeting Available

22. Campus Open-Access Funds: SPARC Webcast Archive Now Online

23. BYU Student Wins First Sparky Awards Peoples’ Choice Prize

24. Open Access Week 2010 Declared for October 18–24

25. SPARC Digital Repositories Meeting 2010 to Convene Nov. 8–9 in Baltimore

26. U of Calgary Press & Library Partner in Scholarly Communication Center

27. CSHE Publishes Working Papers on Peer Review

Transforming Research Libraries

28. ARL Scenarios Project Releases Informational Resources

29. CARL Reviews Opportunities for Data-Curation Services

30. The Future of Digital Humanities: Two New Resources

31. “Digital-Information Seeker” Report Offers Meta-Analysis of User Research

32. IMLS UpNext Wiki Gathers Input on Future of Libraries & Museums

33. CNI Update

Diversity, Professional Workforce, and Leadership Development

34. Purdue University Libraries Host Diversity Scholars

35. Two ARL Diversity Scholars Receive ALA REACH 21 Scholarships

36. Succession Planning: ARL RLLF Program Starts Planning for 2011–12

37. SLA Recognizes Five Information Professionals as “Rising Stars”

38. AAAS-AAU Handbook Fosters Diversity in Higher Education

Library Statistics and Assessment

39. ARL Annual Statistical Surveys Update—Analytics from 1963 through 2009 Now Available

40. LibQUAL+® Update

41. Lib-Value Workshop to Explore ROI in Academic Libraries

42. ARL Statistics & Assessment Events at ALA Annual Conference, Washington DC, June 24–July 2

Other Items of Interest to ARL Directors

43. Publications Recently Released by ARL

44. Call for Proposals for SPEC Survey Topics—Deadline July 25

45. Alberta Celebrates the “Research Library,” Awards Honorary Degrees

46. ARL Transitions

47. SPARC Transition

48. Other Transitions

49. Honors


GOVERNANCE AND MEMBERSHIP ACTIVITIES

1. ARL Membership Convenes in Seattle

ARL President Brinley Franklin (Connecticut) convened the 156th ARL Membership Meeting April 28-30 in Seattle. At the meeting, 107 ARL member library representatives took part in program sessions examining globalization, business models for interdependent collections, and shared infrastructure for university press e-books. Most of the speakers’ remarks and slides are available on the ARL Web site.

At the Business Meeting on April 29, member library representatives voted to extend a membership invitation to the University of Ottawa (See item 2, below). Committee chairs provided progress reports and members received outlines of “Activities, Projects, and Priorities” in five ARL program areas: Influencing Public Policies; Reshaping Scholarly Communication; Transforming Research Libraries; Diversity & Leadership; and Statistics & Assessment. In addition, ARL Executive Director Charles B. Lowry made two reports: a report on the ARL Financial Strategies Overview and a summary of the results of the survey on ARL Library Budgets for 2009-2010. Documents from the Business Meeting are available on the members-only section of the ARL Directors' Wiki (login required):

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2. University of Ottawa Becomes Newest Member of ARL

At its 2010 Spring Membership Meeting, the ARL membership voted to invite the University of Ottawa Library to join as the 125th member. Located in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, the university is a bilingual institution and a member of the Canadian research-intensive “G-13” institutions based on sponsored research and number of PhDs. The library brings together people, expertise, and knowledge resources in physical and virtual environments that foster research, teaching, and learning in English and French. Leslie Weir, University Librarian, accepted the invitation to join ARL. For more information, see the press release.

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3. ARL Board Convenes, Takes Action

The ARL Board met in conjunction with the April Membership Meeting in Seattle. In the context of follow-up to the recommendations of the Strategic Plan Review Task Force, the Board took two actions: (1) endorsed establishment of a Task Force to Assess the International Engagement of ARL (to be established this spring) and (2) postponed consideration of the recommendation to develop a budget-planning proposal and program objectives to provide partial support for leadership development as an enabling capability until the new Diversity and Leadership Committee concludes its assessment of current leadership initiatives. Finally, the Board endorsed a recommendation from the Statistics and Assessment Committee to cease future collection of the Preservation Statistics (beginning with the 2009–10 cycle) while the Transforming Research Libraries Steering Committee folds the stewardship responsibilities of research libraries into its scope of inquiry concerning the future shape of collections. For more information, contact Sue Baughman.

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INFLUENCING PUBLIC POLICIES

4. ARL Joins EFF in Amicus Brief on DMCA Safe Harbor in Viacom v. YouTube

E-news April 2010: Policy Notes Blog

With other nonprofits, ARL joined the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) in an amicus brief in the case Viacom v. YouTube. In 1998, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) established a vital safe harbor for online service providers such as YouTube, Craigslist, and other services that allow individuals to publish and transmit content on the Internet. The DMCA states that service providers are not responsible for their users’ online actions in most ordinary circumstances. This safe harbor has allowed for the creation of sites such as Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, and Twitter. Viacom has now sued YouTube over user-posted content on its site, claiming that YouTube cannot seek shelter under the DMCA unless YouTube implements filtering technology to police its networks on behalf of content owners. The amicus brief argues that the positions taken by Viacom would largely eliminate the utility of the DMCA’s safe harbors. For more details, see the ARL Policy Notes blog post on this topic and the amicus brief.

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5. Supreme Court to Hear First-Sale Doctrine Case, Costco v. Omega

The US Supreme Court has agreed to review the Ninth Circuit’s decision in Costco v. Omega, a case involving the Copyright Act’s first-sale doctrine. The Supreme Court’s decision in this case could have an impact on libraries’ ability to import and circulate books and other materials published abroad. The case involves the applicability of the first-sale doctrine to works produced abroad. By its terms, the first-sale doctrine applies only to works “lawfully made” under title 17, Copyrights. In this case, Costco bought Omega watches abroad, to which Omega had attached a copyrighted logo. When Costco sold the watches in the US, Omega sued. Costco stated that the sale was permitted under the first-sale doctrine, but Omega argued that the first-sale doctrine did not apply to works produced abroad. The Ninth Circuit agreed, relying on a statement by Justice Ginsburg in a concurring opinion in the Quality King case that the phrase "works lawfully made under this title" in 109(a) means lawfully made in the US. Justice Ginsburg reasoned that since the copyright laws are not extraterritorial, no other interpretation of the clause makes sense. The Library Copyright Alliance is considering filing an amicus brief arguing in favor of first-sale rights with respect to copyrighted works produced abroad. For more information, contact Brandon Butler.

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6. Court of Appeals Strikes Down Order Suppressing Allegedly Infringing Book

On April 30, the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit issued what may be a landmark opinion for copyright defendants, reversing the district court's preliminary injunction against author Fredrik Colting in the case Salinger v. Colting. The estate of J. D. Salinger claims that Colting's book, 60 Years Later: Coming through the Rye, infringes the estate’s copyright in The Catcher in the Rye. Colting claims his work is a commentary on the original and thus fair use. Salinger won an initial order forbidding distribution of 60 Years Later, which Colting challenged in an appeal. In an amicus brief, ARL joined ALA, ACRL, the Right to Write Fund, and the Organization for Transformative Works to argue that Colting's book was a fair use and that the order to silence Colting was improper. The Court of Appeals struck down the injunction against Colting, saying a recent Supreme Court ruling requires rights holders to make a stronger showing of "irreparable harm" in order to obtain an order silencing an alleged infringer. Such orders raise serious First Amendment concerns and can be extremely harmful to alleged infringers who may rely on income from the disputed product in order to finance their defense. Now the case returns to the district court for re-argument of the injunction dispute as well as a final decision on the fair use issue. For more details, see the ARL Policy Notes blog post on this case.

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7. ARL Joins in ACTA Analysis

Following months of leaked draft texts of the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), the full draft text was publicly released in late April and ARL’s previous concerns with the text were substantiated. ARL and other organizations endorsed a new, consolidated review and analysis of the ACTA text by Jonathan Band, counsel to the Library Copyright Alliance. Band reviews the key problems that persist in the released ACTA text. In the analysis, Band states, “US law is a careful balance between the rights-holder's limited monopoly over creative expression and the right of the public to use and share that expression.…Our national commitment to free expression and innovation here in the US is inconsistent with trade agreements that weigh heavily in favor of censorship and control abroad.” For more information, see the review and analysis.

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8. CCIA Releases Study on Fair Use in the US Economy

On April 27, the Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA) released Fair Use in the US Economy, a report that presents the most current data (from 2007) on the economic contributions of industries that rely on fair use and related exemptions to copyright law. Examples of such industries include education, software development, and Internet publishing and broadcasting. The data demonstrate how exemptions to copyright promote innovation and economic growth. According to the study, the fair-use economy in 2007 accounted for one-sixth of total US GDP and employed one of every eight US workers. The study finds that the fair-use economy grew faster than the rest of the US economy from 2002 to 2007, expanding 5 percent and accounting for 23 percent of real economic growth. For more details, see the CCIA press release and the report.

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9. Federal Research Public Access Act Introduced in US House of Representatives

With other members of the Open Access Working Group, ARL wrote in strong support of the Federal Research Public Access Act (FRPAA), H.R. 5037. Representatives Doyle (D-PA), Waxman (D-CA), Wasserman-Schultz (D-FL), Harper (R-MS), Boucher (D-VA), and Rohrabacher (R-CA) introduced the bill, which would ensure free, timely, online access to the published results of research funded by 11 US federal agencies. This is a companion bill to S. 1373. FRPAA would require those agencies with annual extramural research budgets of $100 million or more to provide the public with online access to research manuscripts stemming from such funding no later than six months after publication in a peer-reviewed journal. The bill gives individual agencies flexibility in choosing the location of the digital repository to house this content, as long as the repositories meet conditions for interoperability and public accessibility, and have provisions for long-term archiving. For more information, see the ARL Web page on FRPAA.

The provosts and presidents of 27 major private and public research institutions have voiced their support for FRPAA in an “Open Letter to the Higher Education Community,” released April 30 by the Harvard University Provost. The letter signals expanded support for public access to publicly funded research among the largest research institutions in the US. For more details, see the open letter.

In a related action, the House Science and Technology Committee is reauthorizing the America Competes Act, a law that promotes US competitiveness through a renewed focus on improvements in math and science education and a strong commitment to research. As the bill moves through the legislative process, public-access provisions are under active discussion. Reauthorizing this act is a priority for the House Science and Technology Committee and the White House.

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10. NSF to Require Data-Management Plans with Grant Proposals

This fall, the National Science Foundation (NSF) is planning to implement a new policy requiring researchers to submit a data-management plan as a supplement to any regular grant proposal, essentially making data management an element of merit review. Edward Seidel, Acting Assistant Director of NSF’s Mathematics and Physical Sciences Directorate, called the new requirement “phase one” of a broader effort to address the growing interest from US policymakers in access to federally funded data. For more information, please see the NSF press release.

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11. Court Rules on FCC Authority; FCC to Take “Third Way” on Internet Regulation

On April 6 in its decision of the case Comcast v. Federal Communications Commission, the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit handed down a dramatic rejection of the Federal Communication Commission’s (FCC) claim of authority over Internet access providers. For years, the FCC has argued that it has “ancillary authority” over cable and DSL network operators, and that under that theory it could enforce network-neutrality policies as well as take a host of actions to encourage broadband deployment and protect broadband users. The court ruled decisively that the FCC had not justified its claim of ancillary authority. However, the court’s decision does not bar the FCC from protecting the Internet and its users against unfair network practices. Indeed, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski announced on May 6 that he intends to reestablish the FCC’s authority under existing law by taking a “third way” approach to protecting consumers and the Internet. The Comcast v. FCC decision showed that “ancillary authority” was too weak, but many feel that the full panoply of telephone regulations would be too heavy a burden on the Internet. Genachowski proposes a middle path: the FCC would apply only a few of the extensive telephone rules to the Internet, committing in advance that it would not apply the rest. The process to officially adopt this new approach could be complete as soon as August. On May 10, ARL together with ALA and EDUCAUSE sent a letter to Chairman Genachowski applauding his decision and urging the FCC to act quickly to protect the open Internet and implement the National Broadband Plan. Also, in March, ARL and several higher-education organizations sent a letter urging the FCC to implement clear, effective rules to protect the open Internet. For more details, see the March 1 letter and the May 10 letter.

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12. Appropriations Update

ARL filed statements with the US Senate Committee on Appropriations in support of FY 2011 appropriations for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the US Government Printing Office (GPO). (The GPO letter was written in partnership with ALA.) For more details, see the NEH letter and the GPO letter.

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13. ARL Joins in Letter to DOD re Transparency in Nuclear Weapons Policy

On May 4, ARL joined OpenTheGovernment.org and other nonprofits in a letter to US Secretary of Defense Robert Gates. The letter expresses thanks for promoting greater transparency in nuclear policy, including the recent publication of the Nuclear Posture Review Report in an entirely unclassified format, and the disclosure of the size of the US nuclear stockpile. The public release of this report is a significant and long-overdue step in the maturation of our national nuclear policy, and the letter’s signatories hope that the disclosure of the nuclear stockpile will strengthen what should be an international norm of increasing transparency on nuclear matters. For more details, see the letter to Secretary Gates.

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14. Faster FOIA Legislation Passes US Senate

On May 5, the US Senate passed the Faster FOIA Act, S. 3111, which would result in recommendations on how to reduce delays in processing Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. The legislation establishes an advisory commission to examine agency practices, such as FOIA fees and backlogs. ARL joined OpenTheGovernment.org in a letter to Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Senator John Cornyn (R-TX) in support of Faster FOIA. For more information, see the letter to the Senators and the bill’s record in the Library of Congress THOMAS database.

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15. ISOO Releases 2009 Classification Report

The US Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) has released its Report to the President, 2009, which discloses information regarding the national security classification system. While the total number of classification actions rose a startling 134 percent from 23.4 million in FY 2008 to 54.8 million in FY 2009, the report attributes much of this increase to more accurate data provided by agencies using revised guidance from ISOO. The number of pages that were declassified in FY 2009 declined by 8 percent from FY 2008, and the number of pages that were reviewed increased by 1 percent. During FY 2009, ISOO conducted a review and found that each Executive-branch agency was deficient in at least one core element of the classification program. ISOO will continue to conduct annual assessments and work with the agencies to improve compliance. For more details, see the ISOO report.

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16. Audit Reveals Wide Variation in Agency Open-Government Plans

OpenTheGovernment.org organized an audit to reveal the strongest and weakest open-government plans held by federal agencies. The audit was conducted by volunteers from nonprofit groups, academia, and other public-interest organizations who have experience working with the agencies and evaluating information policies. The evaluators view these plans and the audit as the beginning of a process to make government more transparent, participatory, and collaborative. To view the ranking of agency plans, visit the audit Web site.

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17. NEH Announces $16 Million in Awards & Offers for Humanities Projects

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) announced $16 million in grant awards and matching-fund offers for 286 humanities projects. The new funding supports a wide variety of projects nationwide, including traveling exhibitions, research fellowships, production and development of films, documentation of endangered languages, the development and staging of major exhibitions, digital tools, and the preservation of and access to historic collections. In this award cycle, institutions and independent scholars in 44 states and the District of Columbia will receive NEH support. To view a state-by-state listing of the grants and offers, visit the NEH Web site.

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18. Preserving the American Historical Record Act Introduced in US Senate

On April 19, the Preserving the American Historical Record Act (PAHR), S. 3227, was introduced in the US Senate by Senators Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Carl Levin (D-MI). The PAHR legislation would establish a new federal program of formula grants to the states and territories to support archives and the preservation of historical records at the state and local level. The bill is identical to H.R. 2256, introduced last year in the House by Representatives Maurice Hinchey (D-NY-22) and John McHugh (R-NY-23). Nearly 60 Members of Congress have signed on as co-sponsors. Senators Bennett, Gillibrand, Kerry, Schumer, and Shaheen were original co-sponsors in the Senate. For more information, visit the National Coalition for History Web site.

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RESHAPING SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION

19. Strategies for Opening Up Content: Special Issue of RLI Released

RLI 269 cover

ARL has published a special issue of Research Library Issues (RLI) on strategies for opening up content. The special issue, guest edited by ARL’s Julia Blixrud, focuses on approaches now being deployed to increase the amount of content that is open and available to the research library community and by extension the larger world. Included are articles on the University of Kansas open-access policy, open-access publishing funds, model license language for author rights, and HathiTrust. RLI 269 is freely available on the Web.

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20. Scholarly Communication Trends in China: Audio & Slides from Membership Meeting Available

The April ARL Membership Meeting featured a concurrent session on issues and trends in scholarly communication in China, the largest higher-education system in the world. Peter Zhou, Director of C.V. Starr East Asian Library, University of California, Berkeley, provided a useful overview of the higher-education system, scholarly publishing, and current library systems. Greg Tananbaum, Anianet founder and CEO, described why and how Anianet is trying to reduce the barriers separating Chinese and Western researchers. Listen to audio and view slides from Zhou’s and Tananbaum’s presentations on the meeting proceedings Web site.

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21. University Press Collaborations for E-Book Delivery: Slides from Membership Meeting Available

The April ARL Membership Meeting included a plenary session on collaborative planning for e-books that featured representatives from two university press e-book projects. Johns Hopkins University Press, represented by Becky Brasington Clark, Marketing Director, has been offering e-books through licensing arrangements for nearly 10 years. The press is now investigating how to expand both the content and the functionality they offer as well as identify appropriate partners for e-book delivery. Steve Maikowski, Director, New York University Press, and October Ivins, Consultant, Ivins eContent Solutions, reported on the results of a planning grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for a collaborative university press e-book project. This group is in the midst of developing a consortium and appraising technology vendors, purchasing models and partnerships, and delivery platforms. Both projects indicated that they will be launching their products in the first quarter of 2011. View slides from all three speakers on the meeting proceedings Web site.

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22. Campus Open-Access Funds: SPARC Webcast Archive Now Online

On May 5, consultant Greg Tananbaum joined SPARC in a webcast to explore the design and implementation of open-access funds on campus. The discussion covered why institutions are launching open-access funds, what practical and policy issues go into such a decision, how faculty and administration have reacted to these funds, what the results have been to date, and what SPARC is doing to evaluate and track the impact of these funds. Watch the webcast on SPARC’s blip.tv channel.

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23. BYU Student Wins First Sparky Awards Peoples’ Choice Prize

Aaron Ludwig, a sophomore animation student at Brigham Young University (BYU), won the first-ever Sparky Awards Peoples’ Choice prize for his short film, “Clueless Discovery.” The video was voted the best by students and others everywhere in an open online vote held earlier this spring. Organized by SPARC and adopted by campuses everywhere, the Sparky Awards contest calls on entrants to creatively illustrate in a short video the value of openly sharing ideas. For more details and to watch the 45-second video, see the SPARC press release.

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24. Open Access Week 2010 Declared for October 18–24

The fourth annual Open Access Week—the global event to promote free, immediate, online access to research—has been declared for October 18–24, 2010. Open Access Week is an opportunity for the worldwide academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of open access (OA), to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to inspire wider participation in helping to make OA a new norm in scholarship and research. For more information, see the SPARC press release.

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25. SPARC Digital Repositories Meeting 2010 to Convene Nov. 8–9 in Baltimore

SPARC, in partnership with SPARC Europe and SPARC Japan/National Institute of Informatics, has announced the next installment of the popular SPARC Digital Repositories Meeting will be held November 8–9, 2010, at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland. For more information, visit the meeting Web site.

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26. U of Calgary Press & Library Partner in Scholarly Communication Center

The Centre for Scholarly Communication at the University of Calgary, which opened April 1, is the first center of its kind in Canada that involves such close collaboration between a university library and university press. The center provides a full suite of publishing services that support the life cycle of research. Services offered include peer-reviewed open access, e-book, and print-on-demand publishing; an open-access authors’ fund, the first of its kind in Canada; the national Synergies initiative, which publishes and preserves research in Canadian social sciences and humanities; digitization and preservation services; and copyright consultation services. For more information, see the center’s Web site.

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27. CSHE Publishes Working Papers on Peer Review

As part of its Future of Scholarly Communication Project, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Center for Studies in Higher Education (CSHE) has hosted two meetings to explore how peer review relates to scholarly communication and academic values. The proceedings from the April 2010 meeting, “Peer Review in Academic Promotion and Publishing: Its Meaning, Locus, and Future,” will be published at a future date, but four draft working papers by Diane Harley, Sophia Krzys Acord, and Sarah Earl-Novell are now available. The topics of the working papers are:

  • “Peer Review in Academic Promotion and Publishing: Norms, Complaints, and Costs”
  • “New Models of Peer Review: Repositories, Open Peer Review, and Post Publication Metrics”
  • “Open Access: Green OA, Gold OA, and University Resolutions”
  • “Creating New Publishing and Peer Review Models: Scholarly Societies, Presses, Libraries, Commercial Publishers, and Other Stakeholders”

Download the working papers from the CSHE Web site.

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TRANSFORMING RESEARCH LIBRARIES

28. ARL Scenarios Project Releases Informational Resources

E-News May 2010: Susan Stickley presentation

The new ARL project, Envisioning Research Library Futures: A Scenario Thinking Project, has released two sets of resources that provide an overview of the project and promote a broader understanding of scenarios as planning tools: (1) a compilation of frequently asked questions (FAQs) and (2) the audio and slides from the April ARL Membership Meeting session about scenario thinking. The FAQs are available on the project Web site and the audio and slides are available on the Membership Meeting proceedings Web site.

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29. CARL Reviews Opportunities for Data-Curation Services

The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) has released a report to help library leaders assess opportunities and develop strategies for supporting e-research, particularly data curation. The report, Addressing the Research Data Gap: A Review of Novel Services for Libraries, points to resources and examples from research libraries and other institutions across the English-speaking world that illustrate high-level opportunities for data-curation support. The document offers concise highlights of opportunities in promoting awareness and advocacy, offering support and training, facilitating access and discovery, supporting archiving and preservation, and engaging with virtual research environments. Download the report from the CARL Web site.

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30. The Future of Digital Humanities: Two New Resources

The Mellon Foundation recently sponsored a three-day invitational conference at the University of Virginia, “Online Humanities Scholarship: The Shape of Things to Come,“ which challenged presenters and participants to consider the future of online humanities scholarship. The nine papers and eighteen responses are available on the conference Web site.

In another forum, Christine Borgman, Professor & Presidential Chair in Information Studies at UCLA, has published a manifesto, “The Digital Future is Now: A Call to Action for the Humanities,” in which she analyzes the challenges facing the humanities and calls humanities scholars to action. Borgman’s article is part of a special issue of Digital Humanities Quarterly on “E-Science for the Arts and Humanities.”

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31. “Digital-Information Seeker” Report Offers Meta-Analysis of User Research

JISC has published a high-level synthesis of 12 recent user studies conducted in the US and the UK, The Digital-Information Seeker: Report of the Findings from Selected OCLC, RIN, and JISC User-Behaviour Projects. The report, authored by Lynn Silipigni Connaway and Timothy Dickey of OCLC Research for JISC, identifies common findings, conflicting conclusions, and contradictory perspectives from the studies. Focused on use of digital resources and information systems, the authors offer concise, thoughtful analysis of implications for libraries seeking to reposition themselves to cope with ongoing changes in user behaviors and expectations. For more information and to download the full report, see the JISC Web site.

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32. IMLS UpNext Wiki Gathers Input on Future of Libraries & Museums

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) is hosting an ongoing wiki-based discussion of issues affecting the future of libraries and museums. UpNext: The Future of Museums and Libraries Wiki is promoting conversation around 10 themes or questions on topics ranging from changing roles to sustainability, from policy to place. The discussion features guest contributors and is based on the IMLS publication, Future of Museums and Libraries: A Discussion Guide. Visit the wiki and download the discussion guide.

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33. CNI Update

A. Spring Membership Meeting Materials Now Online

The CNI Spring 2010 Membership Meeting was held April 12–13 in Baltimore, Maryland; over 35 project briefing sessions were presented on a wide variety of topics including management of large-scale data sets in e-research and projects related to changes in scholarly communication and the role of libraries and information technology. The opening plenary session featured a panel discussion moderated by CNI director Clifford Lynch, which explored institutional implementation strategies for open-access mandates. Liz Lyon, director of UKOLN, explored developments in science at Web scale in the closing plenary, “Codes, Clouds and Constellations: Open Science in the Data Decade.” Handouts and presentation materials are now available on the meeting Web site and podcast interviews with key presenters and attendees are forthcoming. Videos of several sessions have been made available on CNI's YouTube channel and Vimeo channel.

B. April CNI Conversations Podcast Available; Register for May Session Now

The archived podcast of the April 15 session of CNI Conversations is available on the series Web site. The conversation included a recap of the CNI Spring 2010 Membership Meeting by CNI Executive Director Clifford Lynch and Associate Director Joan Lippincott. Clifford also discussed the recent announcement by the Library of Congress to archive the Twitter database, an event on sustainable digital preservation held in Washington DC on April 1, and the e-journals summits convened by the National Academies, among other topics. Questions included the state of e-books with the advent of the iPad.

The next session of CNI Conversations will take place on May 27, 1:00–2:00 p.m. EDT and is open to individuals at CNI member institutions. If you are interested in participating, contact Jackie Eudell.

C. JISC/CNI Conference—Register Now

Registration is open for the eighth international JISC/CNI conference, “Managing Data in Difficult Times,” to be held July 1–2, 2010, in Edinburgh, Scotland. Both Clifford Lynch and Joan Lippincott will make presentations at the meeting, and keynote speakers include Dan Atkins, Sayeed Choudhury, Heather Joseph, and Liz Lyon. For more information, see the event Web site.

D. Lynch Lectures on Scholarship & Cultural Memory

Video of the 20th annual Elizabeth W. Stone Lecture, “Scholarship, Cultural Memory and Libraries in the 21st Century,” presented by Clifford Lynch at the Catholic University of America (CUA) in Washington DC on April 20, is available at on the CUA Web site.

For the Latest From CNI

CNI-ANNOUNCE: cni-announce-subscribe@cni.org
CNI News RSS: http://news.cni.org/

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DIVERSITY, PROFESSIONAL WORKFORCE, AND LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

34. Purdue University Libraries Host Diversity Scholars

E-News May 2010: Purdue IRDW visit
Photo: Teresa M. Brown,
Purdue University

On April 11–14, the Purdue University Libraries hosted the 2009–11 ARL Diversity Scholars for a research libraries visit. The annual visit, which Purdue has hosted for six years, provides MLIS students from traditionally underrepresented groups an in-depth view of the daily workings of a major research library and life in a Midwestern college community. Diversity Scholars attended presentations on topics such as embedded librarianship, the promotion and tenure process on campus, and library liaisons. The agenda included formal presentations, library tours, and social events attended by Purdue library and campus administrators as well as Purdue library staff. For more information on the Diversity Scholars and ARL’s Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce, visit the initiative’s Web site.

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35. Two ARL Diversity Scholars Receive ALA REACH 21 Scholarships

ARL Diversity Scholars Christina Herd and Samip Mallick are among this year’s recipients of scholarships from ALA’s project REACH 21: Preparing the Next Generation of Librarians for Leadership, which is funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). REACH 21 scholarship winners receive full support to attend the 2010 Spectrum Leadership Institute in Washington DC, June 23–25. The institute brings together LIS students and graduates from across the country to network, learn models of cross-cultural leadership, reaffirm professional values grounded in service to diverse communities, develop career skills, and connect with a wide-range of leaders and potential mentors. For more information about the ALA REACH 21 project, see the ALA Web site.

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36. Succession Planning: ARL RLLF Program Starts Planning for 2011–12

At the April ARL Membership Meeting, a review of the current status of the Research Library Leadership Fellows (RLLF) Program—ARL’s executive leadership program for future senior-level leaders in research libraries—was provided by five of the seven sponsoring directors: Julene Butler (Brigham Young), Joyce Garnett (Western Ontario), Joyce Ogburn (Utah), Dana Rooks (Houston), and Judith Russell (Florida). Sponsors expressed enthusiasm for the RLLF Program, urging support by the ARL membership for future iterations. The following schedule for developing the next iteration of the RLLF was announced. Between now and the end of July, library directors interested in sponsoring a future iteration of the RLLF should contact Charles Lowry or program advisors DeEtta Jones Young and Duane Webster. By October, the feasibility of a 2011–12 RLLF offering will be determined and, if a sufficient number of libraries are interested, an operating schedule will be announced.

For more information about the RLLF Program, see “Our Collective Wisdom: Succession Planning and the ARL Research Library Leadership Program” in Journal of Library Administration, 49, no.8 (2009): 781–793 and visit the RLLF Web site.

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37. SLA Recognizes Five Information Professionals as “Rising Stars”

The Special Libraries Association (SLA) has named five early-career professionals—two from ARL libraries—as recipients of the 2010 SLA Rising Star Award. Now in its second year, the Rising Star Award is presented to SLA members with one to five years of experience who show exceptional promise of leadership and contribution to SLA and the profession. The 2010 Rising Stars are: Jessica Warner Beauchamp, a digitization facilitator for the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC; Amy Buckland, the e-scholarship, e-publishing, and digitization coordinator at McGill University Library in Montreal, Canada; Reece Dano, an embedded librarian at Ziba Design in Portland, Oregon; Bethan Ruddock, a content development officer for UK education communities, based at the University of Manchester; and Chris Vestal, a patent-application researcher at ASRC Management Services in Washington DC. For details, see the SLA press release.

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38. AAAS-AAU Handbook Fosters Diversity in Higher Education

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the Association of American Universities (AAU) have released a handbook that outlines legally sustainable ways to expand diversity on campuses, particularly within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. The handbook offers in-depth, cross-referenced legal resources to help promote effective diversity programs for science faculty and students. Download Navigating a Complex Landscape to Foster Greater Faculty and Student Diversity in Higher Education from the AAAS Web site.

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LIBRARY STATISTICS AND ASSESSMENT

39. ARL Annual Statistical Surveys Update—Analytics from 1963 through 2009 Now Available

The status of the annual ARL statistical surveys is as follows:

  • ARL Annual Salary Survey 2009–10: Final tables are available on the ARL Web site.
  • ARL Statistics, Academic Health Sciences, Academic Law 2008–09: Data verification is almost complete. Data are readily accessible to ARL institutions via http://www.arlstatistics.org/ (login required; your library’s primary contact can approve your e-mail access to the system). ARL Index data are calculated after the Statistics data are verified.
  • ARL Supplementary Statistics 2008–09: Data collection underway. Collected data are readily accessible via the “Data Repository” link at http://www.arlstatistics.org/.
  • ARL Preservation Statistics 2008–09: Data collection underway. Collected data are readily accessible via the “Data Repository” link at http://www.arlstatistics.org/.

All ARL institutions have access to all of the ARL Statistics data as soon as the data are submitted through the StatsQUAL® password-protected gateway at http://www.arlstatistics.org/. Now, upon login, all Statistics data since 1963 are readily available through the “Analytics” interface. Primary Statistics contacts may add additional library staff members to the StatsQUAL® system for wider accessibility to the data. ARL encourages every primary contact to add their library director to the system.

For more information, contact Martha Kyrillidou.

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40. LibQUAL+® Update

To date, 172 institutions have registered to implement the LibQUAL+® survey in 2010. More than 150,000 valid surveys have been collected from library users this year, with over 110,000 being in the “Lite” form of the survey. The median time for completing a LibQUAL+® Lite survey is five minutes, while the median time for completing the long version is nine and a half minutes. Training on how to use LibQUAL+® results effectively is being planned as a full-day pre-conference workshop before the Library Assessment Conference scheduled for October 24 in Baltimore. As part of the Library Assessment Conference, there will also be a LibQUAL+® Share Fair of poster sessions. For more information, visit the LibQUAL+® Web site or e-mail libqual@arl.org.

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41. Lib-Value Workshop to Explore ROI in Academic Libraries

In collaboration with the University of Tennessee, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the George Washington University, ARL is organizing a Lib-Value workshop about the current state of the art regarding return-on-investment (ROI) methods in academic libraries. The workshop will review methodologies developed and applied to date and will engage the audience in expanding our understanding of how we can measure, describe, and articulate the value of libraries in today’s competitive environment. Lib-Value is a three-year study, funded by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), with the goal of understanding how to measure value and ROI in all aspects of academic libraries. Although the first offering of this workshop (June 26 in Washington DC) is currently full, you are encouraged to register as ARL will pursue additional venues to offer future training in this area. For more information on the workshop and a link to the registration form, see the ARL Web site.

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42. ARL Statistics & Assessment Events at ALA Annual Conference, Washington DC, June 24–July 2

ARL is offering the following statistics and assessment events at the ALA Annual Conference in Washington DC this summer:

  • LibQUAL+®/StatsQUAL®/ARL exhibit booth (#3853)
  • Google Analytics Workshop
  • ClimateQUAL™ Partners Meeting
  • ARL Library Assessment Forum
  • ARL Survey Coordinators and SPEC Liaisons Meeting
  • Return on Investment (Lib-Value) Workshop
  • Value and Impact Workshop
  • METS Workshop: The Basics and Beyond

For details and a complete list of ARL events at the ALA Annual Conference, visit the ARL Web site.

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OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST TO ARL DIRECTORS

43. Publications Recently Released by ARL

Proceedings of the 156th ARL Membership Meeting, April 28–30, 2010, Seattle, Washington

Freely available online.

Research Library Issues, no. 269 (Apr. 2010): A Special Issue on Strategies for Opening Up Content

See item 19 for details. Freely available online.

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44. Call for Proposals for SPEC Survey Topics—Deadline July 25

ARL is seeking proposals for 2011 SPEC survey topics. Each year, ARL works with librarians in North America to develop six surveys of the ARL membership on “hot topics” related to research library policies and practices. (Survey authors do not need to work at an ARL member library, but only ARL libraries are surveyed.) Criteria for selecting a survey topic include its currency and insightfulness, its importance to research libraries, its relevance to ARL’s three strategic directions or its programs promoting diversity or assessment, and whether resources that illustrate current policies and practices can be gathered from survey respondents. Proposals are due by July 25. For more information and to submit a proposal, see the ARL press release.

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45. Alberta Celebrates the “Research Library,” Awards Honorary Degrees

E-News May 2010: Alberta

For two weeks this spring the University of Alberta will showcase the progress and achievements of the University of Alberta Library System. The celebration coincides with spring commencement and with the Canadian Library Association annual convention. As part of the celebration, the university will present honorary degrees to 12 individuals acclaimed as innovators, thinkers, artists, and community builders. Among those individuals being awarded honorary degrees and delivering addresses are four who are identified as personifying support for great research libraries: Hugh Anson-Cartwright, who has devoted 45 years to the preservation of Canadiana; Brewster Kahle, director of the Internet Archive; James Neal, Columbia University Librarian; and Kay Raseroka, University of Botswana Library Director and president of IFLA. For more information, contact Ernie Ingles, Alberta’s Vice-Provost and Chief Librarian.

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46. ARL Transitions

Kent State: James K. Bracken has been appointed Dean of University Libraries, effective August 1. He is currently Assistant Director for Collections, Instruction, and Public Services at the Ohio State University Libraries. Bracken will replace Mark Weber, who is retiring. For details, see the Kent State press release.

Notre Dame: Susan Ohmer, Assistant Provost and William T. and Helen Kuhn Carey Associate Professor of Modern Communication, was appointed Interim Director of Hesburgh Libraries, effective May 19. The university is conducting a national search for a successor to Jennifer Younger, who stepped down at the end of the academic year. For details, see the Notre Dame press release.

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47. SPARC Transition

SPARC Europe: Astrid van Wesenbeeck has been appointed Director, effective part-time on June 15 and full‐time on July 12. She is replacing David Prosser, who was recently appointed Director of Research Libraries UK (RLUK). Van Wesenbeeck is currently Project Manager and Publishing Consultant at IGITUR, Utrecht Publishing & Archiving Services at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. For details, see the SPARC Europe press release.

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48. Other Transitions

ACRL: Joyce L. Ogburn (Utah) has been elected ACRL Vice President/President-Elect, effective in June following the ALA Annual Conference in Washington DC. She will assume the presidency in July 2011 for a one-year term. For details, see the ALA press release.

ALA: James G. Neal (Columbia) has been elected ALA Treasurer, effective in June following the ALA Annual Conference in Washington DC. He will serve as Treasurer through June 2013. For details, see the ALA press release.

GPO: President Obama announced his intent to nominate William J. Boarman as the Public Printer of the US. Boarman is President of the Printing, Publishing & Media Workers Sector of the Communications Workers of America (CWA), and the Senior Vice President of CWA. The Public Printer serves as the Chief Executive Officer of the US Government Printing Office (GPO). For more information, see the White House press release.

OCLC Board: James G. Neal (Columbia) and Brian E. C. Schottlaender (California, San Diego) have been elected to the OCLC Board of Trustees. Neal’s term began in April; Schottlaender’s term starts in November. The OCLC Global Council also elected Berndt Dugall (University of Frankfurt) Vice President/President-Elect, beginning in July. For more information, see the OCLC press release about Neal and the release about Schottlaender and Dugall.

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49. Honors

Charles B. Lowry (ARL) has been appointed Professor Emeritus by the President of the University of Maryland (UMd), effective with his retirement from UMd on July 1.

Michael Ridley (Guelph) is the recipient of the 2010 Miles Blackwell Outstanding Academic Librarian Award presented by the Canadian Library Association (CLA) and the Canadian Association of College and University Libraries (CACUL). The award recognizes leaders, mentors, thinkers, and champions of academic librarianship. For more details, see the CLA/CACUL press release.

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5/26/10

Charles B. Lowry
Executive Director
clowry@arl.org

Kaylyn Groves
Communications Program Officer
kaylyn@arl.org

Association of Research Libraries
21 Dupont Circle
Washington DC 20036
voice: (202) 296-2296
fax: (202) 872-0884


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