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E-News for ARL Directors

June 2011 E-News

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E-News for ARL Directors is a collaboration of ARL program staff, compiled and edited by Charles Lowry and Kaylyn Groves.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Governance and Membership Activities

1. ARL Board to Convene in Washington, DC

2. ARL Spring 2011 Membership Meeting Presentations Available

3. ARL Fall Forum—Save the Dates

Influencing Public Policies

4. ARL Engages US Copyright Office Discussions of Federal Protection for Sound Recordings

5. As GSU Trial Ends, Publishers Lose Another Claim, Scholars Weigh In

6. PROTECT IP Act Advances in US Senate; ARL Voices Concern

7. NEH Releases FY 2011 Budget Plan

8. NHA, AAU Hold Congressional Briefing on Humanities' Role in National Security

9. CIE Submits Testimony on International Programs

10. Obama Transparency Programs at Risk

11. US Senate Passes Faster FOIA Act

Reshaping Scholarly Communication

12. SPARC-ACRL Forum at ALA Annual to Lead Up to Berlin 9 Open Access Conference

13. Call for Posters: Berlin 9 Open Access Conference

14. Seeking Custody of Open Access Content

Transforming Research Libraries

15. ARL 2030 Scenarios Used by KU Libraries

16. UK Research Libraries Release Scenarios for 2050

17. Progress Reports on Current ARL Projects

18. Yale Establishes Institute for Preservation of Cultural Heritage

19. Funding for Sustainability of Digital Resources: Ithaka S+R and Strategic Content Alliance Release Study

20. Scan and Deliver: OCLC Research Publishes Report on User-Initiated Digitization in Special Collections

21. CNI Update

Diversity, Professional Workforce, and Leadership Development

22. IMLS Awards Grant for ARL/MLA Diversity and Inclusion Initiative

23. ARL Career Enhancement Program Fellows Embark on Internships

24. Diversity and Leadership Events at ALA Annual in New Orleans

Library Statistics and Assessment

25. ARL Annual Statistical Surveys Update

26. ARL Statistics & Assessment at ALA Annual in New Orleans

27. Service Quality Evaluation Academy Now Accepting Nominations for 2012

28. Call for Participation—ClimateQUAL®: Organizational Climate & Diversity Assessment 2012

29. LibQUAL+® Update

30. Heath Talks Assessment in Austere Times

31. Circulation Trends in ARL Libraries Featured in LJ

32. ARL Assessment Activities Featured at QQML 2011

Other Items of Interest to ARL Directors

33. Call for Proposals for SPEC Survey Topics—Deadline July 22

34. ARL Transitions

35. ARL Staff Transitions

36. Other Transitions

37. Grants

38. Honors

39. Memorial


GOVERNANCE AND MEMBERSHIP ACTIVITIES

1. ARL Board to Convene in Washington, DC

The ARL Board of Directors will convene for its 177th meeting July 27–28 at the ARL office in Washington, DC. For more information about the meeting, contact Sue Baughman.

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2. ARL Spring 2011 Membership Meeting Presentations Available

Slides and audio recordings of many of the presentations from the ARL Membership Meeting held in Montréal last month are now available on the ARL website.

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3. ARL Fall Forum—Save the Dates

Planning is underway for the next ARL Fall Forum, to be held October 13–14, 2011, in Washington, DC. The program will focus on 21st-century collections. Details about the program and registration will be released this summer.

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INFLUENCING PUBLIC POLICIES

4. ARL Engages US Copyright Office Discussions of Federal Protection for Sound Recordings

On June 2 and 3, ARL’s Brandon Butler participated in a series of roundtable discussions at the US Copyright Office regarding the risks and possible benefits of bestowing federal protection on sound recordings made prior to February 15, 1972. Those recordings are currently protected by state law, which some in the music library community believe serves as an impediment to preservation and access to older recordings. The discussions are part of the Copyright Office's preparation of a report on the subject commissioned by Congress as part of the PRO-IP Act. Other organizations represented at the roundtable included the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the Library of Congress, the Music Library Association, the Association of Recorded Sound Collections, and the National Association of Broadcasters.

Many of the library stakeholders spoke in favor of federalization, arguing that it would provide clarity and create a "public domain" that doesn't exist under state law. The RIAA and other rights-holder organizations strongly opposed federal protection, citing confusion and litigation over ownership of recordings that would result from such a change. ARL and ALA have taken a middle path, recognizing the difficulties that exist under state law, but also the challenges of federal law. Butler emphasized key arguments from Reply Comments filed by ARL and ALA earlier this year: federal copyright law has significant failings compared to state law (primarily the provision for statutory damages), and the Copyright Office could do significant good for libraries by confirming that state copyright law must also respect a fair use exception. He also reminded the group that the polarized nature of copyright policy, which was on full display at times during the roundtable, did not bode well for a legislative process to amend the Copyright Act.

Download ARL and ALA's Reply Comments from the ARL website. Read Butler’s ARL Policy Notes blog post on this issue. Read the meeting transcripts on the Copyright Office website.

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5. As GSU Trial Ends, Publishers Lose Another Claim, Scholars Weigh In

The Georgia State University (GSU) e-reserves trial came to a close on June 7. Court documents show that, on May 26, after the publishers finished presenting their evidence, Judge Orinda Evans threw out one of the publishers' claims against GSU. That leaves one remaining claim, which may be too narrow to support the broad, punitive relief the publishers seek.

The remaining claim, for "indirect infringement," is based on the legal doctrine that an employer is responsible for the acts of its employees when committed in the scope of employment. If the publishers can show that any professor exceeded the bounds of fair use when they made e-reserves requests, they can attribute each violation to GSU. A few stray professorial requests would not likely be sufficiently "continuous and ongoing" to overcome the 11th Amendment bar on judgments against sovereign state institutions, but a large number of errant requests could cross that line.

If the judge does find "continuous and ongoing" infringement, she has wide latitude to order relief. According to an article in Publishers Weekly, the court set two dates in July for post-trial filings, so a final verdict could be delivered as soon as August.

In the meantime, scholars, librarians, and publishers shared their views on the case in a forum in the Chronicle of Higher Education. For a summary of the trial’s conclusion, including commentary from ARL’s Brandon Butler, see the Publishers Weekly article. Additional analysis of the ruling is available on the ARL Policy Notes blog.

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6. PROTECT IP Act Advances in US Senate; ARL Voices Concern

The US Senate Judiciary Committee has endorsed the PROTECT IP Act (S. 968), which ARL and others warned may hamper free expression and undermine Internet security. The bill allows government agents to block access to foreign websites that are deemed to be dedicated to infringing activities, and allows private parties as well as government agents to obtain court orders cutting off advertising and payment services to those sites. In a joint letter with library, education, and public interest organizations, ARL warned that the technological means the bill uses to block access to "rogue" sites could undermine the address system for the entire Internet, and that innocent sites could potentially be taken offline by overbroad application of the bill.

Citing similar concerns, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) has placed a "hold" on the bill, which prevents it from coming up for a vote of the full Senate. The PROTECT IP Act actually includes some reforms designed to satisfy Wyden, who placed a similar hold on a previous bill. Wyden is under pressure from colleagues to let the bill move, but he may be able to achieve positive changes to the bill in exchange for releasing the hold.

Download the joint letter from the EFF website. Check the bill’s status using the Library of Congress THOMAS database.

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7. NEH Releases FY 2011 Budget Plan

As required by the 2011 Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act (H.R. 1473), the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) submitted an operating plan to the US Office of Management and Budget and to Congress that provides FY 2011 program allocations. The plan allocates $16.5 million for the Division of Preservation and Access, $4 million for the Office of Digital Humanities, and $16.2 million for the Office of Research Programs. NEH intends to conduct all grant competitions for FY 2011. For more details, see the National Humanities Alliance website.

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8. NHA, AAU Hold Congressional Briefing on Humanities’ Role in National Security

Last month the National Humanities Alliance (NHA) and the Association of American Universities (AAU) co-sponsored a congressional briefing on “The Humanities in the 21st Century: Addressing National Security & Other Global Challenges through Cultural Understanding.” The briefing, presented in cooperation with the Congressional Humanities Caucus, included panelists from academe and government. Participants addressed such questions as, “can we have national security without cultural understanding?” and “how does federal support for research and related activities help cultivate and employ US expertise in the humanities?” As noted by session moderator David Skorton, President of Cornell University, “when our generals and diplomats speak of securing our future by ‘winning the hearts and minds of the people,’ they are talking about understanding the language, culture, religion, and values of people in Iraq, Afghanistan, Egypt, and elsewhere, endeavors supported by the NEH.” Read David Skorton’s Huffington Post blog entry about the briefing. Additional information about the event, including photos and written remarks from speakers, is available on the NHA website.

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9. CIE Submits Testimony on International Programs

The Coalition for International Education (CIE), of which ARL is a member, submitted testimony to the US Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies in support of FY 2012 international education and foreign language studies funding. Noting the 40% cut to the Department of Education Title VI/Fulbright-Hays programs, the testimony called upon Congress to restore funding to FY 2010 levels in the FY 2012 appropriations bill. The coalition asked that a total of $125.881 million be allocated: $108.360 million for Title VI-A&B; $15.576 million for Fulbright-Hays 102(b)(6); and $1.945 million for the Institute for International Public Policy, Title VI-C. Download the testimony from the National Humanities Alliance website.

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10. Obama Transparency Programs at Risk

With OMB Watch, ARL joined 30 organizations calling for restoration of funds to the Electronic Government Fund (E-Gov Fund) that supports executive branch transparency and open government initiatives. In a letter to the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government, the groups noted, “the E-Gov Fund has a proven track record of successful transparency projects that have delivered efficiency improvements and increased government accountability.” The letter cites USAspending.gov and the IT Dashboard as examples of projects that have “helped root out government waste and inefficiency and recently led to the elimination of some $3 billion in failing technology projects.” For more background and to read the letter, visit the OMB Watch website.

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11. US Senate Passes Faster FOIA Act

On May 27, the US Senate passed the Faster FOIA Act of 2011 (S. 627), which was introduced by Sen. Patrick Leahy (Chair, Senate Judiciary Committee and D-VT). The act calls for the establishment of a commission to: identify means to reduce delays in the processing of FOIA requests; determine why the government's use of FOIA exemptions increased during FY2009; determine whether any disparities in the processing of responses to FOIA requestors have occurred based upon political considerations, ideological viewpoints, the identity of the requestors, affiliation with the media, or affiliation with advocacy groups; determine why such disparities occurred; determine the extent to which political appointees have been involved in the FOIA process; and more. For more information about the Faster FOIA Act, see the Library of Congress THOMAS database.

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RESHAPING SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION

12. SPARC-ACRL Forum at ALA Annual to Lead Up to Berlin 9 Open Access Conference

Attend the SPARC-ACRL Forum at the ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans to learn more about the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities, and to get a preview of this fall’s Berlin 9 Open Access Conference. The Berlin Declaration outlines concrete steps to promote the Internet as a medium for disseminating global knowledge, including encouraging researchers and cultural heritage custodians to make all kinds of materials openly available, from texts to datasets. The declaration has garnered signatures from nearly 300 research institutions, libraries, archives, museums, funding agencies, and governments from around the world. In early November near Washington, DC, the Berlin 9 Open Access Conference will convene leaders in the science, humanities, research, funding, and policy communities around the Berlin Declaration. ARL and SPARC are among the sponsors and the planning group for the conference. The SPARC-ACRL Forum will be held this Saturday, June 25, 4:00–6:00 p.m. at the Morial Convention Center, room 383. For more details, see the SPARC news release.

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13. Call for Posters: Berlin 9 Open Access Conference

The Berlin 9 Open Access Conference invites proposals for the conference poster display, which will showcase open access initiatives from all corners of the globe. Posters will be displayed through the duration of the meeting (to be held November 9–10 near Washington, DC) and on the conference website, where policy makers, research funders, scholars, publishers, and advocates will learn about initiatives to enhance research, teaching, learning, and innovation through open access worldwide. Poster proposals will be evaluated according to their contribution to the meeting theme: the impact of open access in research and scholarship. Submissions are due no later than July 27. For more details, visit the Berlin 9 website.

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14. Seeking Custody of Open Access Content

In the June issue of the SPARC Open Access Newsletter, Peter Suber discusses the custody problem in open access (OA) publishing. Suber notes, “The OA movement has given far more attention to the copyright or permission problem than to the custody or possession problem. This may have the effect of sweeping a difficult problem under the rug. We often have permission when we lack custody, and often find that solving the permission problem is easier than solving the custody problem.” Visit the SPARC website to read the full article.

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TRANSFORMING RESEARCH LIBRARIES

15. ARL 2030 Scenarios Used by KU Libraries

The University of Kansas (KU) Libraries have introduced the ARL 2030 Scenarios to staff. Building on the plan they completed during the ARL 2030 Scenarios Workshop held in March 2011, two KU Librarians, Deborah Ludwig and Jennifer Church-Duran, conducted a multi-day workshop using the scenarios to develop a strategic agenda that will inform the libraries’ future strategic planning efforts. Program participants reviewed the 2030 scenarios and identified early indicators of change external to the libraries. Working in small groups, the participants discussed each of the scenarios to formulate strategies for the next three to five years that work across diverse scenarios. Ludwig reports, “The workshop assessment indicated that participants benefited from an effective cross-organizational team-building exercise and appreciated the opportunity to think about the future in a ‘safe’ and productive way. We were pleased with the positive outcomes from our first session and look forward to facilitating a second session in late June.” To learn more about the ARL 2030 Scenarios project, visit the project website or contact Sue Baughman.

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16. UK Research Libraries Release Scenarios for 2050

An 18-month project has resulted in the May 2011 release of Academic Libraries of the Future Scenarios for 2050. This joint initiative of the British Library, Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), Research Information Network (RIN), Research Libraries UK (RLUK), and the Society of College, National, and University Libraries (SCONUL) explored future scenarios for teaching, academic, and research libraries in the context of the changing academic and technological landscape. Scenarios for 2050 provide an “overview of the broad global political, economic and social environment in 2050, the nature of Higher Education within the environment, how libraries might be organized and the services (including physical space) they might offer.” The three scenarios developed include the Wild West (no-holds-barred, free-for-all), Beehive (all is ordered to ensure the common good), and Walled Garden (an oasis, shut-off from the world). The Academic Libraries of the Future project was led by Curtis+Cartwright Consulting Ltd. Next steps for the community include market testing of the scenarios and development of case studies on their use. To read more about the Scenarios for 2050, including documentation on how to use them, visit the Academic Libraries of the Future website.

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17. Progress Reports on Current ARL Projects

Two major projects in ARL’s Transforming Research Libraries Strategic Direction have reached notable milestones:

Sustainability of Digital Special Collections

ARL and Ithaka S+R have partnered to develop a survey that will gather data about digitized special collections in libraries, museums, and archives. Members of the ARL Working Group on Transforming Special Collections in a Digital Age and the project’s Advisory Board provided feedback about the survey questions. The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) is currently reviewing the survey. After IMLS completes its review, the survey will be reviewed by the US Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Once OMB completes its review, the survey will be sent to all ARL members and cultural institutions that have received National Leadership Grants to create or enhance digitized special collections. For more information, contact Charles Lowry.

ARL/DLF E-Science Institute

In July, the institute will launch its first of four modules, which will span six months. This work will provide the tools for developing a strategic agenda for e-research support at each institution. The institute recently conducted two webinars to brief participants on goals, expectations, and timelines. For more information, visit the E-Science Institute website.

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18. Yale Establishes Institute for Preservation of Cultural Heritage

Yale University announced the creation of the Yale Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage, funded by a gift of $25 million from Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin (class of 1978). The institute will unite the resources of the university’s museum and library collections with the scientific and technological expertise of Yale’s academic departments to advance conservation science and its practice around the world. Among other projects, the institute will extend initiatives already under way at Yale to explore the use of nanotechnology to slow the decay of artworks; apply computer technology to create specialized tools to care for ancient mosaics; and use 3-D technology to digitize and study collections. The institute also aims to build its faculty and staff resources so that it may increasingly offer services of assessment and technical analysis in the field, addressing site conditions and unique preservation issues that threaten the longevity of vital cultural resources in remote environments. For more details, see the Yale Daily Bulletin.

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19. Funding for Sustainability of Digital Resources: Ithaka S+R and Strategic Content Alliance Release Study

On June 14, Ithaka S+R, funded by the JISC-led Strategic Content Alliance (SCA), published Funding for Sustainability: How Funders' Practices Influence the Future of Digital Resources. This report, written by Nancy L. Maron and Matthew Loy, provides funders of digital resources and their grantees with an overview of current funding practices and highlights areas for potential improvement in defining and planning for post-grant sustainability. According to the report, which is based on interviews with representatives from more than 25 funding bodies in Europe and North America, many funders only engage their grantees in planning for sustainability at the beginning of the grant period. The report also finds that funders and grantees often rely heavily on a university or other host institution as a back-up plan for long-term sustainability. The report offers funders and grantees a high-level process for working together at the proposal stage to set plans for sustainability. Download the report from the Ithaka S+R website.

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20. Scan and Deliver: OCLC Research Publishes Report on User-Initiated Digitization in Special Collections

OCLC Research and the RLG Partnership Working Group on Streamlining Photography and Scanning recently investigated factors affecting digitization-on-demand workflows and ways to reduce cumbersome workflow and policy issues. OCLC Research has published the resulting report, Scan and Deliver: Managing User-Initiated Digitization in Special Collections and Archives. The report concludes that, by adopting a flexible tiered approach, librarians and archivists can make access their top priority, streamline user-initiated digitization workflows, and leverage digital technology to deliver special collections and archives to users efficiently. Scan and Deliver is available for free download from the OCLC website, as is the earlier companion report Capture and Release: Digital Cameras in the Reading Room.

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21. CNI Update

New videos from the Spring 2011 CNI Membership Meeting have been added to CNI's channels on YouTube and Vimeo, including:

  • "Memento: Giant Leaps Towards Seamless Navigation of the Past Web," presented by Robert Sanderson of Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • The University of Calgary's "Creating a Comprehensive Technology Model for a Converged Library, Archive, Art, and Publishing Facility"

  • "Data Management Plans Online," by Todd Grappone of UCLA and Patricia Cruse of the California Digital Library

Podcast interviews with key attendees and presenters at the Spring 2011 CNI Membership Meeting are now available on the EDUCAUSE website.

In two June CNI Conversations podcasts Clifford Lynch and Joan Lippincott discuss the Digging into Data conference, persistent identifiers, crowdsourcing and data, the future of academic libraries, national approaches to digital preservation, and more. See http://conversations.cni.org/.

CNI at ALA: Clifford Lynch will present the keynote address for the OCLC symposium, “The Infinite Collection: Resources in the Digital Age,” on Friday, June 24. Clifford will also be on LITA's Top Tech Trends Panel on Sunday, June 26.

Save the Dates: Future CNI Membership Meetings
2011 Fall Meeting, Arlington, Virginia—December 12–13, 2011
2012 Spring Meeting, Baltimore, Maryland—April 2–3, 2012
2012 Fall Meeting, Washington, DC—December 10–11, 2012
2013 Spring Meeting, San Antonio, Texas—April 4–5, 2013
2013 Fall Meeting, Washington, DC—December 9–10, 2013

For the Latest from CNI
CNI-ANNOUNCE: cni-announce-subscribe@cni.org
CNI News: http://news.cni.org/
Follow CNI: http://twitter.com/cni_org

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DIVERSITY, PROFESSIONAL WORKFORCE, AND LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

22. IMLS Awards Grant for ARL/MLA Diversity and Inclusion Initiative

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) has awarded a Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program grant to ARL to fund a new partnership with the Music Library Association (MLA). The ARL/MLA Diversity and Inclusion Initiative (ARL/MLA DII) will seek to address the need for professional staff in music and performing arts libraries to better reflect evolving demographics of students and faculty in music and performing arts higher education. ARL and MLA—along with partner libraries at University at Buffalo, SUNY; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; University of North Texas; and University of Pittsburgh—will recruit 15 diverse students with educational backgrounds in music to participate in the three-year program. For more details about the program, see the ARL press release.

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23.ARL Career Enhancement Program Fellows Embark on Internships

This summer, 19 fellows in ARL’s Career Enhancement Program (CEP) are interning at eight CEP host institutions across the US. Each fellow will spend six to twelve weeks at their host institution, working closely with a mentoring librarian and supervisor to ensure a rich and rewarding experience. The paid internship is the final component of the CEP fellowship, which provides MLIS students from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups an opportunity to jump-start their careers in research libraries. For more information on the program, including lists of fellows and host institutions, visit the CEP website.

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24. Diversity and Leadership Events at ALA Annual in New Orleans

ARL Diversity Program Representatives at ALA Diversity & Outreach Fair

Representatives from ARL’s Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce (IRDW) and Career Enhancement Program (CEP) will present a poster during the upcoming ALA Diversity and Outreach Fair. The poster is about the IRDW and CEP and “Inclusive Recruitment Leading to Literacies in Research Libraries.” The Diversity and Outreach Fair, held in conjunction with the ALA Annual Conference, will take place on Saturday, June 25, 3:00–5:00 p.m., at the Morial Convention Center in the Special Exhibits Area, Hall G. Note that the location for this event has changed. For further details, visit the ALA website.

ARL Leadership and Career Development Program (LCDP) Forum

ARL is hosting its first Leadership and Career Development Program (LCDP) Forum at the ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans. The program will feature a panel presentation by three former LCDP participants, plus a “research showcase” where program alumni will share information about their research projects and other significant contributions to the profession. The formal presentation will be followed by a networking event. The program is coordinated by several LCDP alumni and is generously underwritten by current and former LCDP sponsoring directors. The LCDP Forum will be held, Sunday, June 26, 1:30–3:30 p.m., in the Pontalba room of the New Orleans Intercontinental Hotel, 444 St. Charles Avenue. Note that registration for this event closed on June 17. For more information, contact Mark A. Puente.

ALA Town Hall Meeting on Diversity

ALA’s Committee on Diversity is presenting a Town Hall Meeting on Diversity to provide Annual Conference attendees with an opportunity to discuss key diversity issues and develop strategies for use within the profession, workplace, and communities. The meeting will be held Friday, June 24, 8:00 a.m.–noon, in the Morial Convention Center, room 265–268. For more details, see the ALA news release.

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LIBRARY STATISTICS AND ASSESSMENT

25. ARL Annual Statistical Surveys Update

The status of the annual ARL statistical surveys is as follows:

  • ARL Annual Salary Survey 2010–2011: Working on final tables, which will be posted to the website in the coming days.
  • ARL Statistics, Academic Health Sciences, Academic Law 2009–2010: Data are currently being verified. The mailing is available on the ARL website. Please respond to our questions promptly.
  • ARL Supplementary Statistics 2009–2010: Data are currently being verified. The mailing is available on the ARL website.
  • All data are readily accessible via the “Analytics” tab and “Data Repository” link at http://www.arlstatistics.org/ (login required; your library’s primary ARL Statistics contact can approve your access to the system). New feature: The site now includes a Directory of contacts at ARL libraries who have access to the ARL Statistics system. This is useful if you have questions for specific institutions about the Statistics.
  • ARL Preservation Statistics are being discontinued. Future work in this area will focus on the development of a vision for 21st-century research library collections that addresses strategic directions for preservation activities.

The ARL Survey Coordinators and SPEC Liaisons will meet at the ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans on Friday, June 24, 2:30–4:00 p.m., at the Loews New Orleans Hotel in the Terrebonne room. The discussion will focus on the recent analysis of feedback and charting of future directions that the ARL Statistics and Assessment Committee undertook in its May meeting. For details on the May committee meeting, see the ARL website.

For more information about the annual surveys, contact Martha Kyrillidou.

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26. ARL Statistics & Assessment at ALA Annual in New Orleans

Conference registration is not necessary to attend the below events. Exhibit registration is required to visit the booth.

ARL/LibQUAL+®/StatsQUAL® Booth (#2162)
Friday–Monday, June 24–27
Morial Convention Center

ClimateQUAL® Partners Meeting
Friday, June 24
9:00 a.m.–noon
by invitation only

ARL Library Assessment Forum Friday, June 24
12:30–2:00 p.m.
Loews Hotel, Terrebonne room

ARL Survey Coordinators & SPEC Liaisons Meeting Friday, June 24
2:30–4:00 p.m.
Loews Hotel, Terrebonne room

LibQUAL+® Share Fair
Monday, June 27
8:30–10:30 a.m.
DoubleTree Hotel, Nottoway A room

Basic Skills for Analyzing Library Service Quality Assessment Data
Monday, June 27
Noon–5:00 p.m.
DoubleTree Hotel, Nottoway A room

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27. Service Quality Evaluation Academy Now Accepting Nominations for 2012

Service Quality Evaluation Academy wordle

Improve your quantitative and qualitative analysis skills at the Service Quality Evaluation Academy, to be held March 12–16, 2012, in New Orleans. The 2012 academy, sponsored by ARL and the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL), is now accepting participant nominations. The academy is an intensive five-day program that focuses on both quantitative and qualitative analysis of library service quality data. The academy also provides participants with the opportunity to share service quality assessment plans, strategies, and experiences. Instructors for the 2012 academy are Colleen Cook, Bruce Thompson, and Nick Woolf. The selection process is competitive and nominations/applications are due December 16, 2011. For more details, see the Service Quality Evaluation Academy website.

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28. Call for Participation—ClimateQUAL®: Organizational Climate & Diversity Assessment 2012

Are you interested in assessing your library's organizational climate and diversity? ARL invites participation in the ClimateQUAL® survey in 2012. The ClimateQUAL®: Organizational Climate and Diversity Assessment (OCDA) project centerpiece is an online survey that collects information about staff perceptions of (a) the organization’s commitment to the principles of diversity, (b) organizational policies and procedures, and (c) staff attitudes. The survey addresses issues such as diversity, teamwork, learning, fairness, current managerial practices, and staff attitudes and beliefs. The project is currently seeking eight to ten additional US, Canadian, and UK institutions to participate in 2012. Please note that participants need to survey at least 50 part-time or full-time employees, possibly including student workers. For more information about the benefits and responsibilities of participating, see the ARL press release.

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29. LibQUAL+® Update

2012 Registration Now Open

Register now for LibQUAL+® 2012, with an improved website, the customizing feature LibQUAL+® Lite, and a new fee structure that rewards periodic structured participation with discounts.

2011 Participation Update

In the first half of 2011, 130 institutions registered for the LibQUAL+® survey and library users have completed over 107,000 surveys. The optional LibQUAL+® Lite protocol is proving to garner higher response rates and shorten response times compared to the longer version of the survey.

New Custom Analyses

This September, the LibQUAL+® team will offer a new service: User Subgroup Custom Analysis notebooks. For the same fee as the other custom analysis notebooks ($3,200), this new analysis can be performed for each of three different user groups: Undergraduate, Graduate, and Faculty. For example, if a North American College/University orders an Undergraduate User Subgroup Custom Analysis notebook, the LibQUAL+® team will drill down into the undergraduate data and provide analysis for First-year, Second-year, Third-year, Fourth-year, Fifth-year and above, and Non-degree students.

LibQUAL+® at Université de Montréal

Université de Montréal has developed a robust website about their 2010 administration of LibQUAL+®. The site is an excellent resource for francophone ARL member libraries and others interested in seeing how LibQUAL+® is used by an ARL library in Québec. In addition to clearly presented survey results, the site features an action plan along with the most productive actions taken by the university libraries for improvements. For the non–French-speaking, view the site using Google Chrome in order to read the English translation provided by Google Translate.

For more details and additional news about LibQUAL+®, download the complete LibQUAL+® Update (Summer 2011).

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30. Heath Talks Assessment in Austere Times

The University of Texas (UT) Libraries Newsletter recently interviewed Fred Heath, Vice Provost and Director of UT Libraries, about the importance of library assessment, especially in a challenging economic environment. In the interview, Heath discusses his experience and perspective on the vital role of assessment in building a library. He concludes that assessment can give libraries confidence in ”mapping a strategic future, because I think needs evolve, but we have a pretty good sense of a pulse of the community. We know what’s important to them. We know where they’re asking us to go. So we can deliver whatever resources are available with a little more confidence...” To read the interview, download the UT Libraries Newsletter (Spring 2011).

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31. Circulation Trends in ARL Libraries Featured in LJ

In a recent Library Journal (LJ) article, Rick Anderson of the University of Utah Library attempts to expose the full extent of declining circulation in ARL libraries. Anderson examines circulation per student as well as raw circulation numbers. He writes, “At most academic institutions, enrollment tends to rise over time. If enrollment rises while circulation numbers remain the same, then the borrowing behavior of individuals is not actually remaining the same—it's declining.” He concludes that the data “suggest that the trend away from print books is even more pronounced than we've often understood or assumed. But for each individual library, the trends in the world at large matter less than the trend in that institution. These data, which are general and leave many, many other variables unexamined, should prompt a broader and more rigorous study at each individual library.” Read the complete LJ article.

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32. ARL Assessment Activities Featured at QQML 2011

The third International Conference on Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries (QQML 2011) convened in Athens, Greece May 24–27. Two sessions featured ARL planning and assessment activities and strategic planning by ARL member libraries:

  • “Managing Change in Academic Libraries in a Strategic Way:
    The Nature of Evidence for Change Management”
    Martha Kyrillidou, Stephen Town, and Paul Hanges

  • “Organizing Libraries for Effective Decision Making:
    The Role of Library Assessment through Four Case Studies”
    Damon Jaggars, Jennifer Rutner, Kornelia Tancheva, Betty Braaksma and Pat Nicholls, and Stephen Town

Carol Tenopir, co-principal investigator on the Lib-Value grant, presented the keynote, “Beyond Usage: Measuring Library Outcomes and Value.” For more details and links to selected presentation slides, see the June 15 Library Assessment Blog entry about the conference.

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OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST TO ARL DIRECTORS

33. Call for Proposals for SPEC Survey Topics—Deadline July 22

spec 321 cover

ARL is seeking proposals for 2012 SPEC survey topics. For more than 35 years, ARL has gathered and disseminated data about current management issues through the SPEC survey program to assist libraries with continuous improvement. Each year, ARL works with librarians in the US and Canada to develop six surveys of the ARL membership on “hot topics” related to research library policies and practices. Survey authors do not need to work at an ARL member library, but only ARL libraries are surveyed. For consideration for 2012, topic proposals must be submitted by July 22, 2011. For more details, see the ARL press release.

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34. ARL Transitions

Guelph: Mike Ridley announced that he will not seek reappointment as Chief Information Officer and Chief Librarian when his term ends January 1, 2012. He plans to return to the university in 2014 after an administrative/sabbatical leave. For more details, see the university’s announcement.

National Library of Medicine (NLM): Joyce E. B. Backus has been appointed Deputy Associate Director, Library Operations, and NLM representative to ARL, effective June 13, 2011. She was previously Deputy Chief, Public Services.

Oklahoma: Sul Lee announced that he will retire as Dean of University Libraries, effective June 30, 2012. For more details, see the libraries’ announcement.

Washington in St. Louis: Shirley Baker announced her plans to retire as Vice Chancellor for Scholarly Resources and Dean of University Libraries, effective June 30, 2012. For more information, see the university’s news release.

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35. ARL Staff Transitions

Tricia Donovan has been promoted to Communications and Project Coordinator, effective June 13, 2011. She joined the ARL staff in June 2009 as an Administrative Assistant supporting ARL’s strategic directions.

Yolanda Glass has resigned from her position of Administrative Assistant for Statistics and Assessment, effective July 15, 2011, to accept a position back home in California that builds upon her recent degree in graphic design from the Art Institute of Washington.

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36. Other Transitions

US Copyright Office: The Librarian of Congress appointed Maria A. Pallante as Register of Copyrights and Director of the Copyright Office, effective June 1, 2011. In addition to serving as the Acting Register since January 1, 2011, she has held several positions within the Copyright Office: Associate Register for Policy and International Affairs, Deputy General Counsel, and Policy Advisor. She spent much of her career in New York as intellectual property counsel and director of the licensing group for the worldwide Guggenheim Museums. For more details, see the Library of Congress news release.

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37. Grants

This month the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) awarded 24 grants under the Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program. ARL and the following ARL libraries are among the awardees:

Arizona, as a partner with the School of Information Resources and Library Science (SIRLS) Knowledge River Program
Award Amount: $844,965; Matching Amount: $861,480
Project: Recruit and matriculate 33 culturally competent information professionals to work in public libraries, archives, and medical libraries that serve Hispanic American and Native American communities.

ARL, partnering with the Music Library Association and the music libraries at Buffalo, SUNY; Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; North Texas; and Pittsburgh
Award Amount: $456,807; Matching Amount: $281,176
Project: Provide financial support, a mentoring program, paid internships at partner institutions, and career placement services for 15 MLIS students from traditionally underrepresented racial and ethnic minority groups with educational backgrounds in music.

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, partnering with the Graduate School of Library and Information Science
Award Amount: $49,989; Matching Amount: $68,640
Project: Field Strength will begin to identify best practices in field experience in LIS education.

National Archives and Records Administration, as a partner with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH), School of Information and Library Science (SILS)
Award Amount: $897,449; Matching Amount: $372,233
Project: The UNC-CH SILS and School of Government will support one PhD student and 10 dual-degree students, providing each of them with both an MLIS degree and an MPA degree.

New York Public Library (NYPL)
Award Amount: $200,262; Matching Amount: $206,949
Project: Money Matters will educate NYPL staff on the core concepts and related reference sources of personal finance.

For more details, see the IMLS news release.

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38. Honors

Rush Miller (Pittsburgh) has been named the recipient of the 2011 Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA) Distinguished Service Award, which recognizes his outstanding contributions to the advancement of Chinese American librarianship and cooperation between American and Chinese libraries. For more information, see the University of Pittsburgh news release.

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39. Memorial

Frank Malcolm McGowan, author of a dissertation on ARL’s first 30 years and retired Director of Acquisitions and Overseas Operations for the Library of Congress, died March 8 at the age of 79 in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. McGowan worked at the Library of Congress from 1966 to 1982. Previously, he worked at the library of American University of Beirut and headed the library for the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. In 1972, he received a PhD in library science from the University of Pittsburgh, where he wrote his dissertation, “The Association of Research Libraries 1932–1962.” For more information, see the Washington Post obituary.

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06/23/11

Charles B. Lowry
Executive Director
clowry@arl.org

Kaylyn Groves
Communications Program Officer
kaylyn@arl.org

Association of Research Libraries
21 Dupont Circle
Washington DC 20036
voice: (202) 296-2296
fax: (202) 872-0884


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