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E-News for ARL Directors

February 2008 E-News

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To: ARL Directors

From: Duane Webster

Re: E-News for ARL Directors, February 27, 2008

These news notes are organized by the strategic directions identified in the ARL Strategic Plan: Scholarly Communication; Public Policies Affecting Research Libraries; and Library Roles in Research, Teaching, and Learning. In addition, there is an initial section for Governance and Membership Activities and complementary sections on Diversity, Professional Workforce, and Leadership Development; Library Statistics and Assessment; and Other Items of Interest to ARL Directors.

E-News for ARL Directors is a collaboration of ARL program staff, compiled and edited by Duane Webster (duane@arl.org) and Kaylyn Groves (kaylyn@arl.org).

You are encouraged to route the E-News to your staff and others in your institution.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Governance and Membership Activities

1. ARL Board Convenes February 7–8, 2008

Scholarly Communication

2. ARL and NASULGC Sponsor Webcast for Campus Research Officers, March 7, 2008

3. Guide to NIH Public Access Policy Released by ARL

4. California Digital Library Joins Program to Move Journals to Open Access

5. Harvard Faculty Vote to Retain Deposit Rights

6. University of Oregon Faculty Senate Approves Faculty Rights Initiative

7. NISO Approves Shared Electronic Resource Understanding (SERU) Best Practice

8. Campus Engagement with Change in Scholarly Communication

9. Six-Minute Tutorial on Author Rights from University of Minnesota

10. New SPARC Discussion List to Help Libraries Navigate Copyright, Support Authors

11. SPARC Releases New Campaign for Student Engagement

12. SPARC Announces Winners of First Annual SPARKY Awards

13. SPARC-ACRL Midwinter Forum Podcasts and Slides Now Online

Public Policies Affecting Research Libraries

14. Copyright Legislation Update

15. Appropriations Update: Selected Agencies

16. FISA Update

17. GPO Seeks Partners to Digitize Legacy Collections

Library Roles in Research, Teaching, and Learning

18. A Second Life for ARL’s 75th Anniversary Volume Celebrating Research

19. Paper on Assessing Learning Outcomes Now Available from EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative

20. Events Celebrate Student Creativity and Resourcefulness: Campus MovieFest and Pecha Kucha Nights

21. CNI Update

Library Statistics and Assessment

22. ARL Statistical Surveys and Publications Update

23. Update on Assessment Activities

Other Items of Interest to ARL Directors

24. ARL Publications

25. ARL Transitions

26. ARL Staff Transitions

27. Other Transitions

28. Grants

29. Honors

30. Memorial


GOVERNANCE AND MEMBERSHIP ACTIVITIES

1. ARL Board Convenes February 7–8, 2008

ARL President Marianne Gaunt (Rutgers) convened a meeting of the ARL Board of Directors in Washington DC, February 7–8. A primary focus of discussion was review of program plans and development of the ARL budget for 2008. In addition, the Board held a discussion with Don Waters, Scholarly Communication Program Officer at the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Actions taken by the Board include:

a. Adopted a 2008 budget for ARL that concludes the process begun in 2005 of reallocating dues within the budget to support the three strategic directions and the enabling capabilities, increases support for Canadian public policy advocacy, and sustains an annual contribution to ARL's reserve fund. The Board also confirmed a decision to use the reserve fund to cover the direct 2007 expenses of the search for an Executive Director.

b. Accepted the recommendation of the Finance Committee to dissolve it as a standing committee in favor of creating a task force as particular financial strategy issues arise and the Board seeks advice.

c. Revisited the scope for ARL's leadership development activities and agreed on two priorities: development of ARL directors and key staff around priority issues and skills as identified by the ARL strategic directions and the ARL Board of Directors, and development of future directors for planning succession in ARL member libraries. The discussion built on the 2007 report and recommendation from the Task Force on Leadership Development and the subsequent report of a consultant, Raynna Bowlby. Both the task force report and the Bowlby report are available on the ARL Web site in the members-only section at http://www.arl.org/arldocs/membersonly/cmterpts/ARLLeadershipDevReport.pdf and http://www.arl.org/arldocs/membersonly/governance/bowlby-report-24jan08.pdf.

d. Accepted the recommendations of the Task Force on Library Support for E-Science and expressed appreciation for the work of that group. The Board also approved the formation of a new Working Group on E-Science to advise on carrying out the ambitious agenda; its composition will be announced next month.

e. Accepted the invitation of ARL member libraries in Chicago and Urbana-Champaign to hold the ARL Membership Meeting for May 2012 in Chicago. To review, the locations of upcoming May Membership Meetings are: Coral Gables (May 2008), Houston (May 2009), Seattle (May 2010), and Montreal (2011). The dates for future Membership Meetings are published on the ARL Web site as they become available. See http://www.arl.org/events/futuremms/.

f. Adopted the minutes of the Board’s October 2007 meeting. The minutes will be distributed to all member representatives in a separate e-mail.

In addition, in conjunction with their meeting, the Board conducted interviews for the position of Executive Director; the search is expected to conclude in the timeframe originally predicted.

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SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION

2. ARL and NASULGC Sponsor Webcast for Campus Research Officers, March 7, 2008

On Friday, March 7, ARL and NASULGC will present a webcast for vice presidents of research, administrators and staff in funded research and grants office exploring options for institutional responses to the new Public Access Policy adopted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). From 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. EST, presenters Jim Siedow, Vice Provost for Research, Duke University; Kevin L. Smith, JD, Scholarly Communications Officer, Duke University; and Tony Waldrop, Vice Chancellor for Research & Economic Development, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will provide their perspectives on the new policy, particularly the issues around investigators' retaining the rights they need to deposit their articles in PubMed Central.

The webcast is free, but advance registration is required. The webcast will be appropriate for either group presentation or individual viewing. Register online by March 3 at http://www.visualwebcaster.com/event.asp?id=46166 or visit the webcast homepage at http://www.arl.org/sc/implement/nih/webcast/.

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3. Guide to NIH Public Access Policy Released by ARL

A new ARL guide, "The NIH Public Access Policy: Guide for Research Universities," focuses on the implications of the new NIH policy for institutions as grantees. A range of campus constituencies may be involved in implementing the new policy, including research administrators, legal counsel, and librarians. In addition to compliance concerns, the guide also considers the benefits of the new policy and institutions' opportunities to build on the policy requirements by seeking additional rights for using funded research to address local needs.

The guide includes the following sections: Policy Overview, Institutional Responses, Retaining Rights, How to Deposit, and Resources. Reflecting the dynamic nature of campus implementation activities, the guide will be updated as more campuses release plans, resources, and tools that can serve as models for their peers.

The guide is freely available online at http://www.arl.org/sc/implement/nih/guide/.

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4. California Digital Library Joins Program to Move Journals to Open Access

The California Digital Library (CDL) has announced that it is the first US institution to join a growing list of participants in Europe in the SCOAP3 project to fund open access journals in high energy physics. SCOAP3 is a consortial program to aggregate library subscription funds to convert several top high energy physics journals to open access. CDL also hosted a February 29 meeting of consortia and individual libraries interested in learning more about the SCOAP3 project. The announcement and further information about SCOAP3 is available at http://www.scoap3.org/news/news24.html.

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5. Harvard Faculty Vote to Retain Deposit Rights

On February 12, the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) voted unanimously to approve a resolution requiring them to retain the rights needed to deposit their works in institutional and disciplinary repositories. Harvard is the first leading US university to adopt such a policy and the faculty leadership of the initiative is particularly significant. (The University of California Faculty Senate is reviewing a similar motion.) The new policy applies only to journal articles and only the Faculty of Arts and Sciences but it signals a new attitude among faculty about copyright ownership. The announcement of the passage of the resolution is available at http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/2008/02.14/99-fasvote.html and the resolution is available at http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~secfas/February_2008_Agenda.pdf.

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6. University of Oregon Faculty Senate Approves Faculty Rights Initiative

The University Faculty Senate at the University of Oregon voted February 13 to approve an "initiative to protect the rights of faculty authors of scholarly publications." The initiative encourages faculty to manage their rights in their works and use addenda to copyright transfer agreements to at least retain rights to archive their work. The resolution includes creation of a working committee to "propose additional steps" by May 28. The statement is available at http://www.uoregon.edu/~uosenate/dirsen078/US078-17.html.

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7. NISO Approves Shared Electronic Resource Understanding (SERU) Best Practice

Librarians and publishers now have an alternative to negotiated license agreements for their e-resource transactions. While license agreements are helpful for acquiring many electronic resources, for small publishers and many libraries negotiating agreements for every sale is a burden. The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has approved the Shared Electronic Resource Understanding (SERU) as a best practice that can be used where librarians and publishers agree that a license agreement is not necessary. More information on SERU is available at http://www.niso.org/committees/SERU/.

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8. Campus Engagement with Change in Scholarly Communication

The latest issue of the Journal of Electronic Publishing includes an article by ARL’s Karla Hahn entitled "Talk about Talking about New Models of Scholarly Communication." The abstract notes:

Although many new forms of scholarly exchange have reached an advanced state of adoption, scholars and researchers generally remain remarkably naïve and uninformed about many issues involved with change in scholarly publishing and scholarly communication broadly. It is increasingly important that dialogue at research institutions involve a much wider group of researchers and scholars. Only active engagement by those undertaking research and scholarship can ensure that the advancement of research and scholarship takes priority in the development and adoption of new models. Research libraries have led in educating stakeholders about new models and are expanding their outreach to campus communities. In considering the effects of recent change, and looking to emerging trends and concerns, six dangers of the current moment are considered along with six topics ripe for campus dialogue.

The article is available at http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.3336451.0011.108.

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9. Six-Minute Tutorial on Author Rights from University of Minnesota

The University of Minnesota has developed an informational, six-minute video about author rights management and publisher license agreement modification. The presentation is an easy and user-friendly approach to researcher education. It explains the basics of copyright management and options for altering a publisher’s rights transfer agreement. The file is an animated PowerPoint with voice-over explaining the issues, and can be found at https://umconnect.umn.edu/umauthorsrights/.

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10. New SPARC Discussion List to Help Libraries Navigate Copyright, Support Authors

The new SPARC Author Rights Forum provides a private and moderated venue for academic librarians to explore copyright and related issues in teaching and research, especially questions arising from the development of digital repositories and recent public access mandates.

The SPARC Author Rights Forum has been established to support educational outreach to authors on issues related to retaining their copyrights. Topics relevant to the list include, but are not limited to, ensuring copyright compliance with public access policies, including the new National Institutes of Health mandate, rights of faculty under copyright and contract law, availability and use of author addenda, and more.

The list will focus primarily on the US and Canadian legal environments, though members of the international community are welcome to join. Educators, researchers, policy makers, librarians, legal counsel, and all who have an interest in responsible author copyright management are encouraged to contribute. The SPARC Author Rights Forum is moderated by Kevin Smith, JD, Scholarly Communications Officer for Duke University Libraries.

For details on this and other SPARC discussion lists, visit http://www.arl.org/sparc/about/emailsignup.html.

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11. SPARC Releases New Campaign for Student Engagement

SPARC has released a new educational initiative to engage students on the topic of open access. “The Right to Research: The Student Guide to Opening Access to Scholarship” repeats SPARC’s call for student voices to broaden the ongoing discussion of access to research. The guide is intended to:

  • Help students recognize the problem of access, saying they shouldn’t have to skip over research that could be important to their papers

  • Introduce the principle of open access, making a clear distinction between the principle and the ways open access (OA) is being realized—through OA journals, repositories, copyright management, and policies

  • Indicate how open access can make life as a student easier, advance research, widen access to those who need it, and increase visibility for student scholars

  • Offer ways to support OA for both graduate students approaching publishing decisions and undergraduates who wish to adopt the OA cause

For more information, visit http://www.arl.org/sparc/students.

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12. SPARC Announces Winners of First Annual SPARKY Awards

On January 22, SPARC announced the winners of the first SPARKY Awards; the 2007 contest called on entrants to imaginatively illustrate in a short video the value of sharing ideas and information of all kinds.

The three winning entries offer a glimpse of student views on the importance of access to information, and feature an animated look at the most basic benefits of sharing, a film noir-style crime investigation using the Internet, and a tongue-in-cheek documentary on open access. The winners are:

First Place
“Share”
http://blip.tv/file/488550
Written and directed by Habib Yazdi, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

First Runner-Up
“Pri Vetai: Private Eye”
http://www.blip.tv/file/512440
Directed by Tommy McCauley and Max Silver, Carleton College

Second Runner-Up
“An Open Access Manifesto”
http://blip.tv/file/517300
Written and directed by Romel Espinel and Josh Hadro, Pratt Institute

For more information, see http://www.arl.org/sparc/media/08-0122.html.

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13. SPARC-ACRL Midwinter Forum Podcasts and Slides Now Online

Podcasts and slides from the SPARC-ACRL Forum held at the 2008 American Library Association Midwinter Meeting in Philadelphia, “Working with the Facebook Generation: Engaging Student Views on Access to Scholarship,” are now online. See http://www.arl.org/sparc/meetings/ala08mw/.

The forum was also covered in Library Journal’s Academic Newswire, January 17, 2008, “Bright Futurists: Student Speakers Offer Unique Perspective at ACRL/SPARC Forum,” http://www.libraryjournal.com/info/CA6523647.html?nid=2673#news3.

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PUBLIC POLICIES AFFECTING RESEARCH LIBRARIES

14. Copyright Legislation Update

US Copyright Office Hosts Meeting on Section 104 of the PRO IP Act

On January 25, at the request of the US House Judiciary Committee, the Copyright Office hosted a meeting on Section 104 of the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2007 (PRO IP Act). Jonathan Band represented the Library Copyright Alliance (LCA) at the meeting. Section 104 of H.R. 4279 of the Act would alter copyright law with regards to statutory damages. Meeting participants expressed extensive opposition to Section 104. Commenting on the proposed change to copyright law, Band noted that Section 104 would exacerbate the orphan works situation with respect to compilations and derivative works. By greatly increasing the amount of statutory damages plaintiffs could recover for infringements of compilations and derivative works, Section 104 would make libraries and their patrons even more reluctant to use orphan works in support of research, teaching, and learning. LCA with others in the public and private sectors filed comments on the January 25 meeting http://www.arl.org/pp/ppcopyright/copyleg/.

The Subcommittee on Courts, the Internet, and Intellectual Property conducted a hearing on the PRO IP Act on February 13 with mark up of the legislation expected on March 6.

Orphan Works

The US House Subcommittee on Courts, the Internet, and Intellectual Property, Committee on the Judiciary, has scheduled a hearing on orphan works on March 13. In support of the upcoming hearing, a staff briefing was conducted where photographers continued to express serious concerns with orphan works legislation. House and Senate staff have been working on draft legislation for the past year. It is not clear when orphan works legislation will be introduced. House and Senate staff have indicated that orphan works legislation is now a priority.

For more information, contact Prue Adler prue@arl.org.

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15. Appropriations Update: Selected Agencies

National Endowment for the Humanities

The Bush Administration requested $144.4 million for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in FY 2009. This is a decrease of $352,000 from FY 2008. The request reduces funds in two program divisions: Preservation and Access and Challenge Grants. There is a total decrease in funding of these two divisions by $6.8 million with a reduction of -$4.519 in the Preservation and Access Division. The "We the People" program, which supports the study of American culture and history, would benefit from a $5 million increase in FY 2009.

Institute of Museum and Library Services

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) would receive an increase of $26 million in FY 2009 or $271.2 million. Of this amount, $171.5 million would be devoted to state grants and $12.715 million for National Leadership Grants for Libraries, an increase of $556,000.

National Archives and Records Administration

The President requested $404 million for the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for FY 2009. $67 million is provided for the Electronic Records Archives (ERA) program, which seeks to preserve and make accessible federal electronic records. No funds were requested for the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC).

Library of Congress

The Library of Congress requested a total of $645.8 million for FY 2009. This is an increase of $32.333 million or 5.3 percent. Of this amount, $6 million is requested to strengthen the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) network and technical collaboration among partners. Additional increases would support the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, the library's acquisition budget, the Copyright Office, and the Office of Inspector General.

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16. FISA Update

On February 12, the US Senate passed the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Amendments Act or S. 2248. The Senate bill lacks many of the important civil liberties provisions included in the House-passed bill, the RESTORE Act. In addition, the Senate bill includes immunity for telecommunications providers retroactively who participated in the administration's warrantless surveillance program. The House of Representatives failed to act on the Senate bill prior to a planned recess. ARL and the American Library Association have written in support of the RESTORE Act. For more information, see http://www.arl.org/pp/pscl/.

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17. GPO Seeks Partners to Digitize Legacy Collections

The US Government Printing Office (GPO) has posted an "RFI for Mass Digitization Opportunities." The RFI calls for information from industry regarding digitization of approximately 2.2 million documents that have been disseminated via the Federal Depository Library Program. The RFI states that " GPO envisions a cooperative, mutually beneficial relationship with a private sector or public sector participant where the fully faithful, uncompressed, unaltered files create as a result of the conversion process are delivered to GPO. These files will serve as the digital master copies that will be preserved and used for the creation of access derivatives within FDsys." See http://www.fbo.gov/spg/GPO/PSPSD/WashingtonDC/GPORFI08001/listing.html.

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LIBRARY ROLES IN RESEARCH, TEACHING, AND LEARNING

18. A Second Life for ARL’s 75th Anniversary Volume Celebrating Research

In the months following the dissemination of Celebrating Research: Rare and Special Collections from the Membership of the Association of Research Libraries, ARL member libraries have promoted the print volume and companion Web site in a number of ways. ARL has engaged the services of Jeffrey Makala, special collections librarian at the University of South Carolina, to monitor and report how the resources are being used to introduce scholars and students to special collections and potential topics for research and teaching. A note will shortly go to the ARL directors e-mail list and to special collections staff describing the project and inviting responses.

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19. Paper on Assessing Learning Outcomes Now Available from EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative

Instruction librarians may benefit from insight provided in “Making the Grade: The Role of Assessment in Authentic Learning,” EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative Paper 1 (January 2008) by Marilyn Lombardi. The author notes that the majority of students engage with course material in ways that reflect their understanding of how their work will be graded. As pedagogy shifts to creating authentic learning experiences to capture the imagination of students, a different suite of measures is required to assess learning and mastery of concepts. The author provides answers to a set of strategic questions: What are the factors driving assessment reform today? What are the barriers to exploring and exploiting new assessment models? What are the available community resources for supporting and enabling change? Among the new evaluation methods gaining favor are peer assessments, research portfolios, and group work rubrics. A rich suite of tools, guides, and case studies is provided. See http://connect.educause.edu/Library/ELI/MakingtheGradeTheRoleofAs/45771.

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20. Events Celebrate Student Creativity and Resourcefulness: Campus MovieFest and Pecha Kucha Nights

As libraries imagine new ways to support student fluencies, showcase creativity, foster community, and host intellectual conversation, these events are emerging as exciting forums for engagement:

Campus MovieFest (CMF): Billed as “the world’s largest student film festival,” a growing number of universities sponsor an annual competition to promote the making of short films. CMF was created by a pair of students at Emory University in 2001. Two years later it grew into a business that provides cameras, laptops, marketing support, and an awards night for the hosting institution. Libraries have begun to sponsor the competition as a way of bringing students into their learning centers for iMovie training and exposure to multimedia technologies. One ARL library reports 1,200 students participated in their co-sponsored 2007 CMF event. A description of Campus MovieFest can be found at http://www.campusmoviefest.com/.

Pecha Kucha Nights: Loosely translated from the Japanese as “chatter”, this event gives creative individuals a mini-showcase for their work via PowerPoint images and brief word descriptions. A night typically features several presenters, each of whom is limited to 20 images of the work being portrayed, with each image shown and described for just 20 seconds. According to the originators “this keeps presentations concise, the interest level up, and gives more people the chance to show [their creations].” In five years, Pecha Kucha Nights have exploded across the globe, and are now beginning to crop up at universities. One ARL library is sponsoring a Pecha Kucha series this year to feature the work of outstanding students: “we are recruiting student presenters through faculty advisers, indicating that we want individuals with good communication skills who need a push to the next level." For a sense of the event, visit http://www.pecha-kucha.org/.

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21. CNI Update

Preparations are underway for the Spring 2008 CNI Task Force Meeting to be held April 7–8 in Minneapolis. The 2008 Paul Evan Peters Award will be presented during the opening plenary session, and Tara McPherson, Editor of the visionary University of Southern California publication Vectors: Journal of Culture and Technology in a Dynamic Vernacular, will deliver the closing plenary address.

CNI hosted an invitational workshop on identity management and authorship on February 25 in Washington DC. The workshop explored and, where appropriate, began efforts to coordinate a range of developments in historically independent spheres that relate to the management of authorial identity.

Registration is now open for the Seventh International JISC/CNI Conference, to be held at the Europa Hastings Hotel in Belfast, Northern Ireland, on July 10–11. Parallel sessions will explore and contrast major developments on both sides of the Atlantic. This conference will be of interest to all senior library and information technology administrators involved in the education community and those responsible for delivering digital services and resources for learning, teaching, and research. Keynote speakers include EDUCAUSE President and CEO Diana G. Oblinger, and Sir David Melville, Chair of the UK Committee of Inquiry into the Student Experience. Details are available at http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/events/jisc-cni-2008/.

Interviews conducted during the Fall 2007 CNI Task Force Meeting are now online at http://connect.educause.edu/blog/gbayne/podcastsfromcnifall2007ta/46107. The podcasts include a conversation with plenary speaker Timo Hannay, Publishing Director at Nature.com, as well as interviews with some of the winners of the 2007 Mellon Awards for Technology Collaboration (MATC), which were announced at the meeting (see http://matc.mellon.org/winners for a complete list of winners). These recordings are designed to function as an extension of the meeting, complementing the standard program, and providing an opportunity for the broader CNI community to hear from some of our key presenters and attendees. The meeting was held December 10–11, 2007, in Washington DC.

A new article by Clifford Lynch, CNI Executive Director, has been published in the January/February 2008 issue of EDUCAUSE Review 43, no. 1, as the Policy@edu column. "Repatriation, Reconstruction, and Cultural Diplomacy in the Digital World" is available at http://www.educause.edu/er.

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LIBRARY STATISTICS AND ASSESSMENT

22. ARL Statistical Surveys and Publications Update

Status of the ARL statistical surveys and publications is as follows:

  • ARL Annual Salary Survey 2007–08: Preliminary tables were posted to the arl-directors and the arl-statsalary lists. Final verification is underway. Final tables will be issued in the coming days.

  • ARL Statistics 2006–07: 29 libraries have returned their data. The deadline for returns has been extended to the end of February. The mailing is available on the Web at http://www.arl.org/stats/annualsurveys/arlstats/07statmail.shtml. Discussion regarding the new way of counting serials is available through the Library Assessment Blog at http://libraryassessment.info/?cat=28.

  • Library Expenditures as a Percent of University Expenditures for the 40 ARL libraries that are tracked was 2.4% in 2004–05, a slight increase from 2.38% in the previous year. These data are compiled by using the ARL Statistics for library expenditures and the IPEDS finance form for university expenditures. Updated graphs are available at http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/charts.xls.

  • ARL Statistics 2005–06 and ARL Preservation Statistics 2005–06: Publications are in the printing process. A Bimonthly Report article featuring the recent changes in the annual ARL Statistics is available at http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/arl-br-256-stats.pdf.

The ARL Survey Coordinators and SPEC Liaisons Meeting took place on January 11 and reviewed the new data-entry interface and discussed the challenges the group is facing with the changes in the definitions for serials in the ARL Statistics. The group confirmed that the changes are in the right direction, that e-books may also need to be addressed in the future, and that collecting data separately for branch libraries like law and health science library statistics may be counter-productive.

For additional information, contact Martha Kyrillidou martha@arl.org.

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23. Update on Assessment Activities

LibQUAL+®

The 2008 survey opened on January 15. Session I participants can complete all survey setup sections (Preferences, Customization, and Preview) and officially launch their surveys. More than 160 libraries have registered to run the survey in 2008. This year, we are introducing three new languages—Japanese, Spanish, and Welsh—and welcoming libraries from Belgium, France, Japan, and Mexico to participate in the survey using the new translations. Several workshops were held in January focusing on LibQUAL+ ®: the LibQUAL+ ® training sessions were held at the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting in Philadelphia; and Selena Killick of Cranfield University, UK, led two training sessions in Europe—one in London, one in Paris—in addition to a presentation at the ASLIB Engineering Group Annual General Meeting. For more information, contact libqual@arl.org.

Library Assessment Conference 2008

Over 100 submissions have been received for the Library Assessment Conference co-sponsored by ARL, the University of Virginia, and the University of Washington to be held on August 4–6 in Seattle. The deadline for submission of posters has been extended to March 1, as there is increased capacity for poster displays. Registration will open in April. The conference is geared toward all information professionals and researchers with an interest and/or responsibility in the broad field of library assessment. Please consider submitting your poster proposal at http://www.libraryassessment.org/.

ARL Library Assessment Coordinators Meeting

The first ARL Library Assessment Coordinators meeting was hosted by the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia on January 11. The meeting was open to all those in ARL libraries who have responsibility for or work on assessment-related activities (not just assessment “coordinators”) and was part of an ARL effort to support the community of assessment practice. It was designed not only to exchange information about assessment in libraries but also to help develop personal connections with counterparts at other institutions. Transcribed notes from these discussions have been posted on the Library Assessment Blog http://libraryassessment.info/?p=107. Further discussion will take place at the 2008 Library Assessment Conference in August.

Library Assessment Conference (2005) Proceedings

The proceedings of the June 2005 Library Assessment Conference, co-sponsored by ARL and the Alexander Technological Educational Institution of Thessaloniki Library, and partially funded by the European Community Social Fund, are now available. The published papers focus on ARL’s role in library assessment, on the need for library assessment at the international level, and implications for future tool development and library service improvements. Both LibQUAL+® and MINES for Libraries™, two methodologies that have widespread appeal and applicability were discussed in detail. An electronic copy of the proceedings is available at http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/lac-greece-2005.pdf; a print copy can be ordered from http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/pubsorderform.shtml.

Planning for Results: Making Data Work for You

More than 50 academic, federal, special, and public librarians attended “Planning for Results: Making Data Work for You,” co-sponsored by ARL, OCLC CAPCON, the Special Libraries Association (SLA), and the Federal Library and Information Center Committee (FLICC) on February 19–20 at the Cato Institute in Washington DC. The program featured presentations by Martha Kyrillidou, Neal Kaske, Rick Garcia, Ray Lyons, Kristina Justh, and Gary Roebuck and examined the need for assessment, survey design issues, analysis and interpretation, communicating with stakeholders, and assessment as a PR tool. A second event on “The Art of Strategic Persuasion: Essential Skills for Leaders” will take place on April 10. To register, visit http://www.arl.org/stats/statsevents/.

ClimateQUAL™

Phase II of the ClimateQUAL™: Organization Climate and Diversity Assessment survey officially began on February 18, with 10 libraries participating. The survey is a joint project of the University of Maryland (UM) Libraries, UM’s Industrial/Organizational Psychology Program, and ARL. ClimateQUAL™ is administered to library staff members and contains questions designed to understand how organizational procedures and policies effect customer perception of service quality in a library setting. ARL has established a blog for the project participants. For more information, visit http://www.lib.umd.edu/ocda or e-mail Kristina Justh kristina@arl.org.

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OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST TO ARL DIRECTORS

24. ARL Publications

ARL: A Bimonthly Report, no. 256 (February 2008)
Features "Enhancing Graduate Education: A Fresh Look at Library Engagement," an overview of the October 2007 forum cosponsored by ARL and CNI.
http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/br/br256.shtml

Library Assessment Conference: Thessaloniki 13–15 June 2005: Conference Papers
Mersini Moreleli-Cacouris, ed. • 2006 • ISBN 1-59407-767-3 • EAN 978-1-59407-767-8 • 120 pages
http://www.arl.org/news/pr/lac-proceedings-greece-25jan08.shtml

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25. ARL Transitions

Boston College: Jerome Yavarkovsky announced his intention to retire from his position of University Librarian, effective June 30, 2008.

Georgia Tech: Rich Meyer announced his intention to retire from his position of Dean and Director of Libraries, effective summer 2008.

Ohio: Scott Seaman has been named Dean of Libraries, effective April 1, 2008. Seaman is currently Associate Director, Administrative Services, Norlin Library, University of Colorado at Boulder.

Rochester: Susan Gibbons, Associate Dean for Public Services and Collection Development, has been named Vice Provost and Andrew H. and Janet Dayton Neilly Dean of River Campus Libraries, effective March 1, 2008. She succeeds Ronald F. Dow, who will step down March 1 after 11 years as Dean.

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26. ARL Staff Transitions

Mark Young resigned as Statistics Liaison, effective March 7, 2008, to take a position at PinnacleSports.com.

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27. Other Transitions

American Council on Education: Molly Corbett Broad has been named President, effective May 1, 2008. She is currently a professor in the School of Government at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill and was formerly UNC President.

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28. Grants

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill and the 16 other UNC libraries have been awarded a $150,000 federal Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) grant to develop a virtual union catalog system that will enable their users to request prompt delivery of materials to and from all UNC institutions across the state. The grant funds originated from the federal granting agency, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and were awarded by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources.

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) awarded 19 Connecting to Collections: Statewide Planning Grants that will be used to create conservation plans for collections held in libraries, museums, and archives. Two ARL libraries are partners of grantees:

Rutgers University Libraries are partnering with grant recipient Newark Museum Association, along with four other New Jersey cultural institutions, on “Conservation Plan, New Jersey.” Award amount: $40,000; matching amount: $28,768.

University of Washington Libraries are partnering with grant recipient Washington State Library, along with four other Washington cultural heritage organizations on “Preserving Washington’s Cultural Heritage: Connecting Collections.” Award amount: $40,000; matching amount: $16,478.

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29. Honors

Daniel E. Atkins, inaugural Director of the Office of Cyberinfrastructure at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and a distinguished professor in the School of Information and in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Michigan, has been named the 2008 recipient of the Paul Evan Peters Award. The award recognizes notable, lasting achievements in the creation and innovative use of information resources and services that advance scholarship and intellectual productivity through communication networks.

Carol Pitts Diedrichs, Dean of Libraries at the University of Kentucky, was awarded the 2008 Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement Award for her exceptional service to ALCTS and its areas of interest.

McMaster University Libraries was awarded an Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Excellence in Academic Libraries Award for 2008. The award recognizes the library staff for programs that deliver exemplary services and resources to further the educational mission of the institution.

Duane E. Webster, Executive Director of ARL, has been named as the 2008 recipient of the American Library Association (ALA) Joseph W. Lippincott Award in recognition of Webster’s many accomplishments during his distinguished career at ARL. The award will be presented on Tuesday, July 1, at the ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim, California. To make a reservation to attend the award ceremony, please contact ARL Past President Sherrie Schmidt, University Librarian, Arizona State University, sherrie.schmidt@asu.edu.

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30. Memorial

Kent Herman Hendrickson, 1939–2008

Kent Hendrickson, 68, died in Lincoln, Nebraska, on February 5, 2008. He served as Dean of Libraries at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln (UNL) from 1985 to 1995 before being promoted to Associate Vice Chancellor of Information Services. His tenure in the libraries saw adoption of new technologies such as the online catalog, the establishment of the Friends of the Libraries, and the addition of the two millionth volume. Hendrickson received a bachelor's degree from Iowa State University (1961), and a master’s degree in library science from the University of Michigan (1964). From 1964 to 1970, he was Associate Director for Technical Services for the UNL Libraries. From 1970 to 1982, he worked in the publishing industry in Portland, Oregon, for Richard Abel and Company, which was later acquired by Blackwell's North America. He joined the University of Arizona in 1982 in library services. He returned to UNL from Arizona.

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DEW 2/27/08

Duane Webster
Executive Director
Association of Research Libraries
21 Dupont Circle
Washington DC 20036
v: (202) 296-2296
fax: (202) 872-0884
cell: (202) 251-4431
e-mail: duane@arl.org