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E-News for ARL Directors

December 2009 E-News

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E-News for ARL Directors is a collaboration of ARL program staff, compiled and edited by Charles Lowry (clowry@arl.org) and Kaylyn Groves (kaylyn@arl.org).

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Governance and Membership Activities

1. Future ARL Membership Meeting Dates

2. Status of ARL Committee, Task Force, Working Group Appointments for 2010

Influencing Public Policies

3. Obama Administration Launches Open & Transparent Agenda, Calls for Comments by Jan. 21

4. Nobel Prize–Winning Scientists Urge Congress to Ensure Free Online Access to Federally Funded Research

5. New England University Presidents Back Bill for Public Access

6. Obama Speaks in China on Freedom of Expression & Open Internet

7. FCC Hosts Workshop on Free Speech & Open Internet; Video Online

8. Settlement Reached re Missing Bush Administration E-Mails

9. Vision for FDLP Released by ARL, COSLA, and Ithaka S+R

10. Google Book Search Amended Settlement Agreement Update

11. Support Grows for Access to Copyrighted Works by the Blind and Others with Disabilities

12. Appropriations Update

13. NEH Announces “Digging into Data Challenge” Grantees

Reshaping Scholarly Communication

14. SPARC-ACRL Forum to Examine Open-Access Monographs

15. New Publishing Models for University Press E-Books: SPARC Webcast Archive Available

16. New Media Consortium, Center for Social Media, Open Video Alliance Sponsor 2009 Sparky Awards

17. SCOAP3 Initial Tender Process Nears Deadline; Expressions of Interest Encouraged by Early January

18. UC Press & CDL Collaborate to Offer Open-Access Publishing Services

19. Committee on Economic Development Releases Final Report on "Harnessing Openness" to Improve Higher Ed

Transforming Research Libraries

20. ARL E-Science Survey Resources Now Online

21. Distinctive Collections in the Digital Age: ARL Publishes Special Issue of Research Library Issues

22. OCLC Special Collections & Archives Survey—Deadline Extended to Jan. 8

23. Case Studies Examine Information Use by Life-Sciences Researchers

24. ELI Argues for Moving beyond Learning Spaces to Learning Environments

25. Horizon Technologies Report 2010 Preview Available

26. APLU Reports on Budget Cutting at Public Universities

27. ARL Concluding Survey on 2009-10 Library Base Budgets

28. CNI Update

Diversity, Professional Workforce, and Leadership Development

29. ARL Career Enhancement Program Fellows Selected for 2010

30. ARL Diversity Programs Host E-Science Webcast; Archive Now Online

Library Statistics and Assessment

31. ARL Annual Statistical Surveys Update

32. ARL Statistics & Assessment Events at ALA Midwinter, Boston, Jan. 2010

33. Analysis of ARL Library Profiles to Be Completed in Early 2010; Submit Profiles by Jan. 31

34. Call for Proposals for 2010 Library Assessment Conference Due by Feb. 15

35. LibQUAL+® Lite Offered via New LibQUAL+® Web Site

36. NCES Academic Library Statistics 2008 Available

Other Items of Interest to ARL Directors

37. ARL, LibQUAL+®, SPARC at ALA Midwinter, Boston, Jan. 2010

38. Publications Recently Released by ARL

39. Mellon Foundation Awards CLIR $1.4 Million Operating Grant

40. ARL Transitions

41. ARL Staff Transitions

42. Other Transitions


GOVERNANCE AND MEMBERSHIP ACTIVITIES

1. Future ARL Membership Meeting Dates

Dates are set for the 2010 and 2011 ARL Membership Meetings. The 2010 Membership Meetings will be held April 27-30 in Seattle and October 12-15 in Washington DC; the spring meeting will be held earlier than it has been in the past in order to avoid conflict with commencement ceremonies. The 2011 Membership Meeting dates are May 3-6 in Montreal and October 11-14 in Washington DC. A complete calendar of future Membership Meeting dates is available online http://www.arl.org/events/futuremms/.

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2. Status of ARL Committee, Task Force, Working Group Appointments for 2010

The ARL Executive Committee met on December 10 to update the committee and working group appointments for 2010. As the information becomes available, an updated roster will be published on the ARL Web site http://www.arl.org/arl/governance/cmte.shtml. Questions may be directed to Jaia Barrett jaia@arl.org.

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INFLUENCING PUBLIC POLICIES

3. Obama Administration Launches Open & Transparent Agenda, Calls for Comments by Jan. 21

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Calling for more openness in Government, the Obama Administration launched the Open Government Directive on December 9. The Administration noted that “three principles of transparency, participation, and collaboration are the focus of the Directive. Transparency promotes accountability. Participation allows members of the public to contribute ideas and expertise to government initiatives. Collaboration improves the effectiveness of government by encouraging partnerships and cooperation within the federal government, across levels of government, and between the government and private institutions.”

The directive was sent to the head of each federal agency and calls for agencies to undertake actions that will open their agency operations to the public. For example, each agency is to make publicly available “at least three high-value data sets.” And within 60 days, each agency must establish a portal for the public to access its activities.

Importantly, the directive includes a public consultation on access to publicly funded research results. The Administration is seeking views as to whether a policy such as NIH’s Public Access Policy should be extended to other agencies, and if so, how it should be implemented. The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) has initiated a “Public Access Policy Forum” to engage members of the public in discussing the Government’s role in public access to federally funded research. Beginning on December 10, the forum is focusing on three areas:

  • Implementation (Dec. 10–20)
  • Features and Technology (Dec. 21–31)
  • Management (Jan. 1–7)

Each of these three topics will form the basis of a blog posting that will appear at http://www.whitehouse.gov/open/ and will be open for comment on the OSTP blog at http://blog.ostp.gov/. More information is available via “Why Open Government Matters” http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2009/12/09/why-open-government-matters.

ARL encourages member representatives to file comments with the OSTP before the January 21 deadline. ARL plans to file comments as well.

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4. Nobel Prize–Winning Scientists Urge Congress to Ensure Free Online Access to Federally Funded Research

In a Nov. 10 open letter to the US Congress, 41 Nobel Prize–winning scientists in medicine, physics, and chemistry stated, "For America to obtain an optimal return on our investment in science, publicly funded research must be shared as broadly as possible." The letter marks the fourth time in five years that leading scientists have called on Congress to ensure free, timely access to the results of federally funded research--this time asking leaders to support the Federal Research Public Access Act of 2009 (FRPAA). The bipartisan FRPAA, introduced by Senators Lieberman (I-CT) and Cornyn (R-TX), would deliver online public access to the published results of research funded through 11 US agencies and departments, requiring that peer-reviewed journal articles stemming from publicly funded research be made available in an online repository no later than six months after publication. For more information and to read the letter, see http://www.taxpayeraccess.org/news/news_releases/09-1110.shtml.

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5. New England University Presidents Back Bill for Public Access

The presidents of six public universities in New England have issued a letter of support for the Federal Research Public Access Act (FRPAA), demonstrating that commitment to public access to publicly funded research resides at the top-most level of research institution administration. Together, these six land-grant universities enroll over 100,000 students, confer 17% of the bachelor's and 20% of the doctoral degrees in New England, and invest more than $700 million annually in research with the support of federal grants. For information and to read the letter, see http://www.taxpayeraccess.org/issues/frpaa/frpaa_supporters/09-1123.shtml.

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6. Obama Speaks in China on Freedom of Expression & Open Internet

On his recent trip to China, President Obama spoke at the Chinese Museum of Science and Technology on the freedom of expression, the free flow of information, and the importance of open use of the Internet. In his remarks he noted the following:

These freedoms of expression and worship--of access to information and political participation--we believe are universal rights. They should be available to all people, including ethnic and religious minorities--whether they are in the United States, China, or any nation. Indeed, it is that respect for universal rights that guides America's openness to other countries; our respect for different cultures; our commitment to international law; and our faith in the future. But I am a big believer in technology and I'm a big believer in openness when it comes to the flow of information. I think that the more freely information flows, the stronger the society becomes, because then citizens of countries around the world can hold their own governments accountable. They can begin to think for themselves. That generates new ideas. It encourages creativity. And so I've always been a strong supporter of open Internet use. I'm a big supporter of non-censorship. This is part of the tradition of the United States that I discussed before, and I recognize that different countries have different traditions. I can tell you that in the United States, the fact that we have free Internet--or unrestricted Internet access--is a source of strength, and I think should be encouraged.

The President's remarks are available online http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/remarks-president-barack-obama-town-hall-meeting-with-future-chinese-leaders.

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7. FCC Hosts Workshop on Free Speech & Open Internet; Video Online

On December 15, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) hosted a workshop on “Speech, Democratic Engagement, and the Open Internet.” The workshop examined the relationship between the Internet's openness and democratic speech and participation, including "citizen journalism," as well as blogging, political organizing, and cultural expression. The workshop also contrasted the Internet with other communications media, covering such issues as network neutrality. A video of the workshop is online http://www.fcc.gov/live/2009_12_15-workshop.html.

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8. Settlement Reached re Missing Bush Administration E-Mails

The Obama Administration reached a settlement with the National Security Archive (NSA) and the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics (CREW) over a significant number of e-mails that were not accounted for during the Bush Administration. The NSA and CREW had filed separate lawsuits with the Government in an attempt to recover White House e-mails, recovering over 22 million e-mails as a result of the lawsuit. The Obama Administration has agreed that 94 days of missing e-mails will be sent to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for long-term preservation. Selected dates were chosen to restore missing e-mail based on e-mail volume and importance of the dates, as there are limited funds available to completely restore all the e-mail that is missing. For more information, see http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/news/20091214/index.htm.

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9. Vision for FDLP Released by ARL, COSLA, and Ithaka S+R

ARL, the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies (COSLA), and Ithaka S+R have released Documents for a Digital Democracy: A Model for the Federal Depository Library Program [FDLP] in the 21st Century, which examines the essential role of the FDLP in distributing, providing access to, and preserving government documents. The report also focuses on the transition of government information from print to digital and how this change in format impacts the FDLP's long-term sustainability. Without a system-wide transformation of current practices, the ability to effectively distribute, provide access to, and preserve this essential information is in jeopardy. The report offers a framework for a system-wide vision that emphasizes:

  • the digitization of historical collections to enable dramatically expanded access as well as greater flexibility in collection management;
  • improved coordination of new government publications by the Government Printing Office (GPO) to ensure access and preservation needs are adequately addressed; and
  • an expanded role for librarians as government information librarians rather than government documents librarians.

The report stresses that preservation and integrity, along with advanced access services, should be achieved through a combination of formalized partnerships and decentralized approaches. Documents for a Digital Democracy is available at http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/documents-for-a-digital-democracy.pdf . If you would like to comment on the contents of the report, visit http://ithaka.org/ithaka-s-r/research/documents-for-a-digital-democracy/. For more information, please contact Prue Adler, prue@arl.org.

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10. Google Book Search Amended Settlement Agreement Update

A. LCA Releases Guide for the Perplexed Part III

The Library Copyright Alliance (LCA)—ARL, ALA, ACRL—released “A Guide for the Perplexed Part III: The Amended Settlement Agreement,” written by Jonathan Band. The guide describes the major changes in the amended settlement agreement (ASA), submitted to the Court by Google, the Authors Guild, and the Association of American Publishers on November 13, 2009, with emphasis on those changes relevant to libraries. While many of the amendments will have little direct impact on libraries, the ASA significantly reduces the scope of the settlement because it excludes most books published outside of the United States. In addition, the ASA provides the Book Rights Registry the authority to increase the number of free public access terminals in public libraries that had initially been set at one per library building, among other changes. Looking ahead, the Court has accepted the parties’ recommended schedule and set January 28, 2010, as the deadline for class members to opt out of the ASA or to file objections, and February 4, 2010, as the deadline for the Department of Justice to file its comments. The Court will hold the fairness hearing on February 18, 2010. The guide is freely available online http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/guide_for_the_perplexed_part3.pdf.

B. ARL, ALA, ACRL File Additional Letter with the Department of Justice

On December 15, ARL, ALA and ACRL sent another letter to the Department of Justice (DoJ) expressing their views on how the DoJ should respond to the Google Book Search Amended Settlement Agreement. The associations noted that, “the most effective way to prevent the [Book Rights] Registry and Google from abusing the control they will have over the essential research facility enabled by the settlement would be for the court to regulate the parties’ conduct under the settlement. Specifically, when requested, the court should review the pricing of the institutional subscription to ensure that it meets the economic objectives set forth in the settlement, i.e., '(1) the realization of revenue at market rates for each Book and license on behalf of Rightsholders and (2) the realization of broad access to the Books by the public, including institutions of higher education.'” The associations also noted disappointment that the DoJ had not considered representation by academic authors on the Registry Board. “While the Statement of Interest articulates at great length concern about the adequacy of representation of foreign rightsholders, it contains no mention whatsoever of academic authors. The parties responded to the US's solicitude for foreign rightsholders by mandating six seats on the Registry board for rightsholders from Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom. But in the absence of any support from the United States for the interests of academic authors, the Amended Settlement Agreement reserves no seats for these scholars whose works constitute most of the books Google will scan and display.” The letter is available online http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/antitrustdivasa-final.pdf.

C. Judge Chin Nomination Hearing Held Dec. 10

Judge Chin, presiding Judge in this case, was nominated by President Obama to serve as a Circuit Judge for the Second Circuit Court of Appeals. His nomination hearing was held December 10 before the Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

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11. Support Grows for Access to Copyrighted Works by the Blind and Others with Disabilities

A. US at WIPO Supports Greater Access for the Blind and Others to Copyrighted Works

The US delegation to the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) made a very strong statement in support of exceptions and limitations in the Copyright Act that support greater access to information. Justin Hughes, heading up the US delegation stated: “The United States is proud to have a series of specific exceptions and limitations in our copyright law, including for education, libraries, and persons with print disabilities. The law of the United States has these exceptions because we believe access to information, cultural expression, and ideas is essential and we know that governments have a role to play in facilitating that access and reducing barriers to information, education and full participation in a democratic society. So while the United States believes profoundly, in the words of our Supreme Court, that copyright law is 'the engine of free expression,' we are also committed to policies that ensure everyone has a chance to get the information and education they need and to live independently as full citizens in their communities.” The LCA strongly supports the US statement. For more information, see http://www.librarycopyrightalliance.org/submissions/international/wipo.shtml.

B. LCA et al. Respond re Access to Copyrighted Works by the Blind and Others with Disabilities

Members of the Library Copyright Alliance (LCA)--ARL, ALA and ACRL--with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Internet Archive, and the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies filed reply comments with the Copyright Office concerning access to copyrighted works for the blind and other persons with disabilities. The Copyright Office is soliciting comments to assist in the formulation of US Administration policy regarding a possible treaty by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). LCA and the public interest organizations noted that, “Our organizations continue to believe that the treaty proposal is needed to address twin forces that have shaped the current global reality in which the world’s visually impaired and reading disabled citizens find themselves. First, there has been a market failure in that publishers have not chosen to supply the market because they perceive it is too small. Second, there has been an international policy failure because most other WIPO Member States have ignored the visually impaired by failing to adopt exceptions similar to 17 U.S.C. § 107 and § 121 in their national copyright laws.” WIPO discussed this issue and a possible treaty in mid-December in Geneva. The LCA's comments are available online http://www.librarycopyrightalliance.org/bm~doc/replycomments_facilitating_disability_access.pdf.

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12. Appropriations Update

On December 13, the US Senate sent to the President for his signature legislation that provides FY 2010 funding to the Departments of Commerce, Justice, Labor, Education, Health and Human Services, Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, Treasury, State, and to the National Science Foundation, in addition to addressing military construction needs. This legislation covers all agencies except for one remaining for the Department of Defense. For more information, contact Prue Adler prue@arl.org.

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13. NEH Announces “Digging into Data Challenge” Grantees

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) announced the recipients of the "Digging into Data Challenge" grants, an international competition sponsored by the UK's Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), the NEH, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and Canada's Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). The funded projects seek to promote innovative projects focused on humanities and social science research utilizing large-scale data analysis. The eight winning teams represent 22 scholars and scientists from the US, Canada, and the UK. Each team includes researchers from at least two of the participating countries. Total project funding by all four agencies is approximately $2 million (US). A description of the funded projects is available via http://www.neh.gov/news/archive/20091204.html.

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RESHAPING SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION

14. SPARC-ACRL Forum to Examine Open-Access Monographs

Three ambitious initiatives to deliver free, online access to scholarly monographs will be featured at the next SPARC-ACRL forum, “The Ebook Transition: Collaborations and Innovations behind Open-Access Monographs.” The forum will be held in conjunction with the ALA Midwinter Meeting in Boston, Saturday, January 16, 2010, 4:00-5:30 p.m. at the Sheraton Boston, Back Bay Ballroom A/B. For more information, see http://www.arl.org/sparc/media/09-1201.shtml.

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15. New Publishing Models for University Press E-Books: SPARC Webcast Archive Available

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The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation recently awarded four university presses a grant to support development of a collaborative e-book project. The grant--to be administered by NYU Press on behalf of collaborating presses at the University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, and Rutgers University--will fund multifaceted research into the feasibility of developing a consortium of university presses to deliver e-books to libraries on a shared platform. On November 20, Monica McCormick, Program Officer for Digital Scholarly Publishing at New York University, joined SPARC to discuss how university presses are thinking about the transition to digital book publishing, the goals of this project and the history behind the grant award, the scope of the initiative, what collaborators will contribute, and how the survey for library customer input is coming together. View the webcast at http://blip.tv/file/2916345.

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16. New Media Consortium, Center for Social Media, Open Video Alliance Sponsor 2009 Sparky Awards

Three new sponsors have thrown their support behind the 2009 Sparky Awards, reinforcing the importance of new media and student voices in the global discussion on access to research, and adding new momentum to the contest in its final weeks: the New Media Consortium, the Center for Social Media, and the Open Video Alliance. For more information about the awards and these sponsors, see http://www.arl.org/sparc/media/09-1112.shtml.

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17. SCOAP3 Initial Tender Process Nears Deadline; Expressions of Interest Encouraged by Early January

SCOAP3--a new model for the dissemination of high-energy physics literature--is asking institutions to sign an expression of interest to make a non-binding commitment of their current expenditures for the subscriptions representing the output of high-energy physics literature. SCOAP3's objectives are to convert the literature of an entire field to open access, to stimulate competition in scientific publishing by linking quality and prices, and to enable medium- and long-term savings. The total expenditure base in these expressions of interest will serve as an initial base from which a tender process will begin. Expected contributions from countries throughout the world have been calculated and publishers have indicated a willingness to enter into negotiations when a threshold of commitments has been reached. In order for the project to move forward in 2010, expressions of interest are needed by early January 2010. ARL encourages its members to give this project serious consideration. For more information, see http://scoap3.org/index.html and http://www.arl.org/sparc/publications/papers/SCOAP3_09april.shtml, or contact Julia Blixrud jblix@arl.org.

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18. UC Press & CDL Collaborate to Offer Open-Access Publishing Services

University of California Press and the California Digital Library have announced the official launch of a collaborative publishing venture, University of California Publishing Services (UCPubS). UCPubS offers a suite of open-access digital and print publication services to University of California centers, institutes, and departments that produce scholarly books. UCPubS is part of the University of California's broader effort to ensure a sustainable scholarly publishing system in support of the university's research and teaching enterprise. For more information, see http://escholarship.org/publish_ucpubs.html

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19. Committee for Economic Development Releases Final Report on "Harnessing Openness" to Improve Higher Ed

The Committee for Economic Development (CED) has published the final version of Harnessing Openness to Improve Research, Teaching, and Learning in Higher Education, which recommends that colleges and universities embrace the concept of increased openness in the use and sharing of information to improve higher education. The report was produced by CED’s Digital Connections Council (DCC), a group of information technology experts that advises CED’s business leaders on cutting-edge technologies. Harnessing Openness identifies some of the potential gains from making higher education more open and recommends actions that policy makers and institutions of higher education can take to harness its benefits. See the press release http://www.ced.org/images/newsroom/2009/cedopennesseducationreportpr09.pdf or download the full report http://www.ced.org/images/library/reports/digital_economy/dcc_opennessedu09.pdf.

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TRANSFORMING RESEARCH LIBRARIES

20. ARL E-Science Survey Resources Now Online

Now available on the ARL Web site are the resources provided by member libraries in response to a recent survey of e-science activities at their institutions. Early findings were presented by Wendy Lougee at the October Membership Meeting. Members reported on a wide range of institution-level and library-based activities that promote management and curation of scientific research data. Brief information on institutional planning and library strategies and activities is provided in the slides from the briefing. See http://www.arl.org/rtl/eresearch/escien/esciensurvey/index.shtml.

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21. Distinctive Collections in the Digital Age: ARL Publishes Special Issue of Research Library Issues

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To sustain the momentum of community interest in rethinking the roles of distinctive collections in the digital age that was evident at the October ARL-CNI forum, the December 2009 issue of RLI (no. 267) is devoted to this topic. Two hundred library directors and special collections librarians and archivists gathered at the forum to consider the value proposition of and innovative possibilities inherent in collections of rare books, archives, and other unique materials. Forum participants also explored the potential for expanding use of these resources via digital technologies and collaborative strategies. Many who participated in the forum observed that the conversations that took place were unthinkable just a few years ago. This special issue of RLI includes papers delivered at the forum by CNI's Clifford Lynch, Cornell's Anne Kenney, and the Mellon Foundation's Don Waters. This issue also features an excellent synthesis by North Carolina State University's Lisa Carter of the major themes that emerged in forum presentations and audience discussions. The issue is freely available online http://arl.tizrapublisher.com/view/prvp3/default.

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22. OCLC Special Collections & Archives Survey—Deadline Extended to Jan. 8

The deadline for the OCLC Research survey of the current state of special collections and archives in North America has been extended three weeks to January 8. This will help achieve the high response rate essential to making the data strongly meaningful, particularly as an update of ARL's own 1998 survey. Notable partial results to date include: online records for hidden collections have increased dramatically; use has increased just about everywhere, particularly for archival and visual materials; digital camera use is permitted in 90% of reading rooms; 75% of respondents have digitized some collections; 75% have begun acquiring born-digital archival materials; education and training are most often needed for born-digital materials and information technology; and the two issues most often mentioned as major challenges are born-digital materials and lack of space. Please add your institution’s perspectives. If you are unable to locate the invitation that contains your institution's survey URL, or if you have other questions or comments, contact Jackie Dooley, dooleyj@oclc.org or 949-492-5060 (Pacific time zone).

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23. Case Studies Examine Information Use by Life-Sciences Researchers

The Research Information Network and the British Library commissioned a study, Patterns of Information Use and Exchange: Case Studies of Researchers in the Life Sciences, to look in-depth at changing information use and practices by life science researchers. Seven case studies analyzed different research teams and gathered information on members’ recent information use for their research programs. The report describes the patterns within and across cases and suggests implications for service development for institution. Policy issues are also identified. Although the research is UK-based, the analysis is broad enough to be valuable for US and Canadian libraries. The report is freely available at http://www.rin.ac.uk/our-work/using-and-accessing-information-resources/disciplinary-case-studies-life-sciences.

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24. ELI Argues for Moving beyond Learning Spaces to Learning Environments

A new paper from the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) makes the case for broadening the ongoing attention to the effects and value of learning spaces to a higher-level consideration of learning environments. The report, “Learning Environments: Where Space, Technology, and Culture Converge,” explains that, “The term learning environment encompasses learning resources and technology, means of teaching, modes of learning, and connections to societal and global contexts. The term also includes human behavioral and cultural dimensions, including the vital role of emotion in learning….” In addition to advocating for a new vision of spaces that advance teaching and learning, the report offers nine principles--or recommendations--for those engaged in space planning, which convey the importance of relationships between users, technology, culture, and pedagogy, among other considerations. The paper is freely available at http://www.educause.edu/Resources/LearningEnvironmentsWhereSpace/188507.

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25. Horizon Technologies Report 2010 Preview Available

A preview of the 2010 Horizon Report’s analysis of leading technologies likely to affect higher education is now available at the project’s wiki site. The site also features the 2010 short list of technologies. The report discusses critical challenges and key trends and highlights six technologies: mobile computing, open content, electronic books, simple augmented reality, gesture-based computing, and data visualization and analytics. The report is freely available at http://horizon.wiki.nmc.org/.

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26. APLU Reports on Budget Cutting at Public Universities

The Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU) has released a report detailing findings from a survey of their 188 member institutions. The report documents the scope and magnitude of state reductions in funding public universities, considers the mitigating effects of federal stimulus funding, and details the variety of budget-cutting strategies being deployed. More than half of the responding institutions indicated that they anticipate further cuts in the current fiscal year. Only 16% believe mid-year cuts are unlikely. In addition to reporting short- and long-term budget management strategies, the report analyzes strategies according to the magnitude of budget reductions. The report is freely available online http://www.aplu.org/NetCommunity/Document.Doc?id=1998.

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27. ARL Concluding Survey on 2009–10 Library Base Budgets

ARL will soon conclude its second survey of member library representatives about the impact of the current economic environment on library budgets. The survey focuses on ARL library plans and actions for the library’s base budget. The first survey was conducted in spring 2009 about library actions implemented in FY 2008–09. The current survey collects data about library actions in the FY 2009–10. To date, 86 member libraries have participated. The survey will close in early January 2010; the first report on the findings will be made in February. For more information, contact Charles B. Lowry, clowry@arl.org.

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28. CNI Update

A. New CNI Program Plan Available

The 2009–10 CNI Program Plan was presented by CNI Executive Director Clifford Lynch at the recent CNI Member Meeting in Washington DC and is available on the CNI Web site http://www.cni.org/program/.

B. Fall CNI Membership Meeting Materials Online

The Fall 2009 CNI Membership Meeting was held December 14–15 in Washington DC. Clifford Lynch presented the 2009–10 CNI Program Plan, and Bernard Frischer, Director of the Virtual World Heritage Laboratory of the University of Virginia, gave the closing keynote address, "Beyond Illustration: New Dimensions of 3D Modeling of Cultural Heritage Sites and Monuments." Presentation materials, podcast interviews, and video recordings of selected sessions are being added to the meeting site as available http://www.cni.org/tfms/2009b.fall/.

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C. November CNI Conversations Audio Recording Available

The audio archive of the November 20 session of CNI Conversations--discussions on current topics between CNI Executive Director Clifford Lynch and participants from member institutions and organizations--is now available online http://conversations.cni.org. The discussion featured a preview of the fall CNI Member Meeting by Clifford Lynch. Lynch also reported on the recent ARL-CNI special collections forum, the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR), and a new book on the Fourth Paradigm (a collection of essays dedicated to the memory of Jim Gray, edited by Tony Hey, et al., and published by Microsoft Research). Participant questions covered such topics as the revised Google Books settlement, Lawrence Lessig's EDUCAUSE keynote on copyright, and an update on the Open Annotation Collaboration. If you are interested in participating in a future session of CNI Conversations, please contact one of your organization’s CNI representatives. To automatically receive the latest audio recordings of CNI Conversations, simply add http://conversations.cni.org/feed/ to iTunes, or to any podcatcher.

D. New Publication by Clifford Lynch

Clifford Lynch's essay "Special Collections at the Cusp of the Digital Age: A Credo" appears in the December issue of Research Library Issues http://arl.tizrapublisher.com/pageview/9ishf/prvp3/4.

E. For the Latest From CNI

CNI-ANNOUNCE: cni-announce-subscribe@cni.org
CNI News: http://news.cni.org/

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DIVERSITY, PROFESSIONAL WORKFORCE, AND LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

29. ARL Career Enhancement Program Fellows Selected for 2010

The ARL Career Enhancement Program (CEP) Coordinating Committee has selected 17 fellows to participate in the second year of this competitive fellowship program. The ARL CEP, funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Services and ARL member libraries, gives MLIS students from underrepresented groups an opportunity to jump-start their careers in research libraries by providing a robust fellowship experience that includes an internship in an ARL member library. For more information on the CEP and the 2010 fellows, visit http://www.arl.org/diversity/cep/.

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30. ARL Diversity Programs Host E-Science Webcast; Archive Now Online

enews1209-diversitywebcast

ARL's Diversity Programs hosted a webcast on "The E-Science Imperative: The Future of Data Management in Academic Libraries." Program participants from the Leadership & Career Development Program as well as ARL Diversity Scholars were in attendance for a program presented by Wendy Lougee, University Librarian, University of Minnesota, and Scott Brandt, Associate Dean for Research, Purdue University Libraries. An archive of the webcast is online http://www.infiniteconferencing.com/Events/ARL/120809ARL/recording-playback.html.

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LIBRARY STATISTICS AND ASSESSMENT

31. ARL Annual Statistical Surveys Update

The status of the annual ARL statistical surveys is as follows:

  • ARL Annual Salary Survey 2009–10: Final tables are available at: http://www.arl.org/stats/annualsurveys/salary/sal0910.shtml
  • ARL Statistics, Academic Health Sciences, Academic Law 2008–09: 31 institutions pending submission
  • ARL Supplementary Statistics 2008–09: 31 institutions pending submission
  • ARL Preservation Statistics 2008–09: 63 institutions pending submission

All ARL institutions have access to all the data as soon as they are submitted through the StatsQUAL password-protected gateway at http://www.arlstatistics.org/. Primary contacts may add additional library staff members to the StatsQUAL interface for wider accessibility to the data.

The ARL Statistics and SPEC Survey Liaisons meeting is scheduled to take place in Boston on January 15 from 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. We will focus discussion on the ARL Supplementary Statistics data collection and definitions and on the new variable we collected this year--number of titles for the equivalent number of volumes that has historically been reported in the ARL Statistics.

For more information, contact Martha Kyrillidou martha@arl.org.

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32. ARL Statistics & Assessment Events at ALA Midwinter, Boston, Jan. 2010

LibQUAL+®/StatsQUAL®/ARL booth (#2354) in the Boston Convention Center

Friday, January 15, 5:30–7:30 p.m.
Saturday–Sunday, January 16–17, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Monday, January 18, 9:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.
Contact libqual@arl.org

ClimateQUAL Partners Meeting

Friday, January 15
9:00 a.m.–noon
Institutions interested in implementing ClimateQUAL are invited to join the discussion
Contact climatequal@arl.org

Library Assessment Forum

Friday, January 15
1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
InterContinental Hotel, Griffin/Robinson Room
Featuring:
Carol Tenopir, University of Tennessee, on return-on-investment methodology
Linda Plunket, Boston University, on creating a culture of assessment
http://www.arl.org/stats/statsevents/laforum/index.shtml

ARL Survey Coordinators and SPEC Liaisons Meeting

Friday, January 15
3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
InterContinental Hotel, Griffin/Robinson Room
http://www.arl.org/stats/annualsurveys/surveycoord/survcoordmtg.shtml

LibQUAL+® Training Sessions

Monday, January 18
8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. (three sessions)
Renaissance Waterfront, Atlantic #2
Three sessions will cover "Survey Introduction," "Survey Administration," and "Survey Results"
http://www.arl.org/news/pr/libqual-training-oct09.shtml

METS Workshop: The Basics and Beyond

Monday–Friday, January 18–22
8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Renaissance Waterfront, Georges Room
Workshop led by Nancy Hoebelheinrich and Rick Beaubien, Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) Editorial Board
http://www.arl.org/stats/statsevents/METS-workshop

For a complete list of ARL, LibQUAL+®, and SPARC events to be held at the upcoming ALA Midwinter Meeting in Boston, visit http://www.arl.org/events/arlala/.

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33. Analysis of ARL Library Profiles to Be Completed in Early 2010; Submit Profiles by Jan. 31

To date, almost 70 ARL member libraries have submitted profile descriptions of their institutions; analysis is underway and expected to be completed in early 2010. ARL encourages all member libraries that have not provided a profile to do so by the end of January if possible. The profiles are narrative descriptions that provide a qualitative perspective of the character of research libraries that is parallel to the quantitative view given by the annual ARL Statistics. The narratives serve several purposes: they will (a) stand on their own as well as complement the quantitative annual statistics; (b) help ARL identify possible new descriptive variables for the annual statistics that represent today’s research library; and (c) help ARL explore testing and development of an alternative, multi-factor index measuring and assessing collections, services, and collaborative relations using new data elements identified in the profiling process. Regular presentations have taken place during the ARL Membership Meetings to keep membership aware of progress in this area. The profiles and information about them are available online http://directors.arl.org/wiki/institution-profiles.

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34. Call for Proposals for 2010 Library Assessment Conference Due by Feb. 15

ARL, the University of Virginia Library, the University of Washington Libraries, and the Conference Planning Committee have issued a call for proposals for the 2010 Library Assessment Conference, "Building Effective, Sustainable, Practical Assessment," to be held in Baltimore, Maryland, October 25–27, 2010. The conference goal is to support and nurture the library assessment community through a mix of invited speakers, contributed papers and posters, workshops, and engaging discussion. The conference is geared toward library and information professionals and researchers with responsibility for or an interest in the broad field of library assessment. For more information, visit http://libraryassessment.org/reg/call-for-proposals.shtml.

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35. LibQUAL+® Lite Offered via New LibQUAL+® Web Site

enews1209-libqual

LibQUAL+® has redesigned its Web site to offer a better experience to users, especially LibQUAL+® survey administrators. One of the major improvements is the ability to offer to library users a shorter version of the survey that reduces respondent burden and improves response rates, a protocol known as LibQUAL+® Lite. A thorough study of libraries that engaged in beta testing the LibQUAL+® Lite protocol confirmed that the new protocol cuts respondent burden almost in half and improves response rates. Furthermore, the scores obtained from LibQUAL+® Lite and the long version of the survey are essentially equivalent, so there is no need for score conversion. The latest research on LibQUAL+® Lite in the form of Martha Kyrillidou’s 2009 PhD dissertation, “Item Sampling in Service Quality Assessment Surveys to Improve Response Rates and Reduce Respondent Burden: The 'LibQUAL+® Lite' Randomized Control Trial (RCT),” will be available in January through the IDEALS institutional repository at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. For more information, visit http://www.libqual.org/ or attend one of the LibQUAL+® training events at ALA Midwinter in January http://www.arl.org/news/pr/libqual-training-oct09.shtml.

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36. NCES Academic Library Statistics 2008 Available

The Academic Library Statistics (ALS) 2008 report and data file are now available from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES).
 The ALS are descriptive statistics on 4,166 
academic libraries at two- and four-year degree-
granting postsecondary institutions in the US. Congress uses the data to assess the need for revisions of existing legislation concerning
 academic libraries and academic library programs. Federal agencies that administer library grants
 for collection development, resource sharing, and networking activities require the data to evaluate the condition of academic libraries in order to better
 administer their programs. State education agencies and college librarians and administrators use the data for regional and national comparisons of library resources to plan for the effective 
use of funds. Download the report http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2010348 and the data file http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/libraries/aca_data.asp.

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OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST TO ARL DIRECTORS

37. ARL, LibQUAL+®, SPARC at ALA Midwinter, Boston, Jan. 2010

For a complete list of ARL, LibQUAL+®, and SPARC events to be held at the upcoming ALA Midwinter Meeting in Boston, visit http://www.arl.org/events/arlala/.

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enews1209-statsreport

38. Publications Recently Released by ARL

ARL Statistics 2007–2008

Martha Kyrillidou and Les Bland, comps. and eds.
For more information, including how to order print copies and to download the PDF, see http://www.arl.org/news/pr/ARL-Statistics-7dec09.shtml.

ARL Academic Health Sciences Library Statistics 2007–2008

Les Bland and Martha Kyrillidou, comps. and eds.
For more information, including how to order print copies and to download the PDF, see http://www.arl.org/news/pr/ARL-HS-Statistics-7dec09.shtml.

ARL Academic Law Library Statistics 2007–2008

Les Bland and Martha Kyrillidou, comps. and eds.
For more information, including how to order print copies and to download the PDF, see http://www.arl.org/news/pr/ARL-Law-Statistics-7dec09.shtml.

A Guide for the Perplexed Part III: The Amended Settlement Agreement

by Jonathan Band
Freely available online http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/guide_for_the_perplexed_part3.pdf.

Leave and Professional Development Benefits, SPEC Kit 315

by Cathleen Martyniak and Brian Keith
For more information, including how to order print copies and to download the executive summary and table of contents, see http://www.arl.org/news/pr/spec315-dec09.shtml.

Proceedings of the ARL-CNI Fall Forum, October 14–15, 2009, Washington DC
"An Age of Discovery: Distinctive Collections in the Digital Age"

Freely available online http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/fallforumproceedings/forum09proceedings.shtml

Proceedings of the 155th ARL Membership Meeting, October 14–15, 2009, Washington DC

Freely available online http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/mmproceedings/155mm-proceedings.shtml

Research Library Issues, no. 267 (Dec. 2009): A Special Issue on Distinctive Collections

Freely available online http://arl.tizrapublisher.com/view/prvp3/default.

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39. Mellon Foundation Awards CLIR $1.4 Million Operating Grant

The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) has received a 21-month, $1.4 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support general operations starting January 2010. For more information, see http://www.clir.org/news/pressrelease/09melgrant2.html.

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40. ARL Transitions

Buffalo: Stephen M. Roberts announced his intention to retire as Associate Vice President for University Libraries, effective at the end of this academic year.

California, Davis: Marilyn J. Sharrow announced her intention to retire as University Librarian, effective March 1, 2010.

Howard: Mod Mekkawi is retiring and Arthuree Wright, Associate Director of Reference, has been named Interim Director of Libraries, effective January 2010.

Indiana: Brenda Johnson has been named Ruth Lilly Dean of the Indiana University Libraries, effective March 1, 2010. She currently serves as University Librarian at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Kentucky: Terry Birdwhistell, Associate Dean for Special Collections and Digital Programs at the University Libraries, has been named Interim Dean, effective January 5, 2010, following the departure of Carol Pitts Diedrichs to become Director of Ohio State University Libraries.

Louisville: Diane Nichols, Associate Dean of Library Operations and Director of the William F. Ekstrom Library, has been named Interim Dean of University Libraries, effective January 1, 2010, following the retirement of Hannelore Rader.

Ohio State: Carol Pitts Diedrichs has been named Director of University Libraries, effective January 5, 2010. She was previously Dean of Libraries, William T. Young Endowed Chair at the University of Kentucky.

Stony Brook: Chris Filstrup stepped down as Dean and Director of Libraries on November 30, 2009. Andrew White, former Director of the Health Sciences Library, is serving as Interim Dean and Director.

Yale: Frank M. Turner, the John Hay Whitney Professor of History and Director of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, has been named Interim University Librarian, effective January 2010, following the departure of Alice Prochaska.

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41. ARL Staff

Charles B. Lowry extended his contract as ARL Executive Director through June 30, 2013. He had initially intended to return to the University of Maryland library school faculty in July 2011. However, following the ARL Board’s strong endorsement of his first year as ARL Executive Director, the Executive Committee pursued an extension to his contract.

Gary Roebuck resumed his position as Technical Operations Manager, Statistics and Measurement, effective November 23, 2009.

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42. Other Transitions

National Archives and Records Administration: David S. Ferriero, previously Andrew W. Mellon Director of the New York Public Library (NYPL), was confirmed as the 10th Archivist of the US by the Senate on November 6, 2009, and was sworn in on November 13.

Research Libraries UK (RLUK): David Prosser was appointed Executive Director, effective March 2010. He is currently Director of SPARC Europe.

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12/22/09

Charles B. Lowry
Executive Director
Association of Research Libraries
21 Dupont Circle
Washington DC 20036
v: (202) 296-2296
fax: (202) 872-0884
e-mail: clowry@arl.org


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