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E-News for ARL Directors

April 2009 E-News

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E-News for ARL Directors is a collaboration of ARL program staff, compiled and edited by Charles Lowry (clowry@arl.org) and Kaylyn Groves (kaylyn@arl.org).

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Governance and Membership Activities

1. ARL Membership to Engage "Transformational Times"

2. ARL Surveys Members on Library Base Budgets, 2008–09

3. ARL Strategic Plan Review Survey Completed

Scholarly Communication

4. Open Access Week Declared for October 19–23, 2009

5. Field Guide to Misunderstandings about Open Access

6. "All about Repositories" Webinar, April 15, 2009, Noon EDT

7. CARL-SPARC Program Helps Canadian Researchers Get Greater Reach for Their Research

8. MIT Announces Institutional Licensing Policy

9. University of Michigan Library Absorbs Press

10. Texas A&M Releases Videos from Scholarly Communication Symposium

11. LIS Editors Release Draft Statements of Ethics and Best Practices

12. Journal of Biology Tries New Approach to Simplified Peer Review

13. Humanities Journals Struggle to Redefine Themselves

14. Academic Misconduct Discovered

15. ARL-ACRL Institute on Scholarly Communication Workshop, "Scholarly Communication Outreach," Draws 70

Public Policies Affecting Research Libraries

16. US NIH Public Access Policy Made Permanent

17. Obama Administration Budget Resolutions Approved

18. ARL and ALA Call for Increase to NEH Budget

19. NARA Seeks Comment on Presidential Libraries and Presidential Records by April 17

20. FOIA Guidelines Revised by US Justice Department

21. OPEN FOIA Act Introduced in US Senate

22. Presidential Records Bill Moves Forward in Senate

23. ARL and Others Urge Obama Administration to End Ideological Exclusion

Transforming Library Roles in Research, Teaching, and Learning

24. Special Collections in ARL Libraries: Working Group Releases Discussion Report

25. Special Collections Forum to Be Held October 15–16, 2009

26. Reinventing Science Librarianship: ARL Publishes Report on 2008 Forum

27. University of Minnesota Releases New Version of Assignment Calculator

28. Learning Spaces Are Focus of Special Issue of EDUCAUSE Review

29. CNI Update

Diversity, Professional Workforce, and Leadership Development

30. ARL Diversity Scholars to Visit Purdue University Libraries April 20–22

31. Leadership & Career Development Institute on Research, Teaching & Learning to Convene at Yale April 25–29

Library Statistics and Assessment

32. ARL Statistical Surveys and Publications Update

33. ARL Statistics and Assessment Events at ALA Annual Conference, Chicago, July 2009

34. ClimateQUAL™ Launches New Web Site

35. LibQUAL+® Lite Featured in Performance Measurement & Metrics

36. Assessment Article Garners Praise

Other Items of Interest to ARL Directors

37. ARL Publishes First E-Only Bimonthly Report, Research Library Issues

38. Grants

39. ARL Transitions

40. ARL Staff Transitions

41. Other Transitions


GOVERNANCE AND MEMBERSHIP ACTIVITIES

1. ARL Membership to Engage "Transformational Times"

The next ARL Membership Meeting, with a program theme of "Transformational Times," will take place in Houston May 20–22. The program was developed by ARL President Thomas C. Leonard, University Librarian, University of California, Berkeley, working in consultation with the ARL Board of Directors. "Transformational Times" is intended to be a meeting that departs from the norm. The meeting organizers hope that it will not be a mere event, but rather the beginning of conversations among ARL libraries that focus on sustained, collaborative actions—actions that will transform libraries in ways that help navigate the current financial shoals and, more importantly, redefine what research libraries are and do in an environment where information is defined principally in terms of networked access. Now is the time to seek actions that establish robust roles for libraries—roles that position libraries as integral to research and higher education. For meeting information, contact Jaia Barrett, jaia@arl.org, or monitor http://www.arl.org/events/currentmm/.

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2. ARL Surveys Members on Library Base Budgets, 2008–09

ARL is surveying member library representatives about the impact of the current economic environment on library budgets for the current budget year, FY 2008–09. This survey focuses on ARL library plans and actions for the library’s base budget that have already been implemented. The survey will be repeated later this spring or summer to collect information about library budget plans for 2009–10. A report on the responses will be presented at the ARL Membership Meeting in May. For more information, contact Sarah Segura, sarah@arl.org

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3. ARL Strategic Plan Review Survey Completed

A Strategic Plan Review Task Force was formed during the winter to collect and examine views of all ARL member representatives and to recommend to the ARL Board an update and revision of ARL's Strategic Plan with priorities for 2010–14. Over 100 member representatives have participated in a task force survey; a preliminary report on the findings will be presented during the May 2009 Business Meeting in Houston. For more information, contact Jaia Barrett, jaia@arl.org.

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SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION

4. Open Access Week Declared for October 19–23, 2009

To accommodate widespread global interest in the movement toward open access to scholarly research results, October 19–23, 2009, will mark the first international Open Access Week. The now-annual event, expanded from one day to a full week, presents an opportunity to broaden awareness and understanding of open access to research, including access policies from all types of research funders, within the international higher education community and the general public. Open Access Week builds on the momentum generated by the 120 campuses in 27 countries that celebrated Open Access Day in 2008. This year's program will highlight educational resources on open access that local hosts can use to customize their own programs to suit local audiences and time zones. See http://www.arl.org/sparc/media/09-0305.shtml.

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5. Field Guide to Misunderstandings about Open Access

Peter Suber, writing in the April 2 SPARC Open Access Newsletter, has identified 25 of the most common misconceptions about open access, including such issues as quality, economics, and copyright. See http://www.arl.org/sparc/publications/articles/openaccess_fieldguide.shtml.

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6. "All about Repositories" Webinar, April 15, 2009, Noon EDT

On April 15 at noon eastern time, the All About Repositories Webinar Series will feature the first, online, interactive follow-up to the successful 2008 SPARC Digital Repositories Meeting. In response to feedback from participants at the meeting, several online events will be organized that explore meeting topics in more detail and anticipate the program of the 2010 SPARC Digital Repositories Meeting, to be held in Baltimore, November 8–9, 2010. At the April installment in the series, Joan Giesecke and Paul Royster from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln will reprise their presentation on value-added services and delve more deeply into discussion with participants during this one-hour session. See http://www.arl.org/sparc/media/09-0319.shtml.

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7. CARL-SPARC Program Helps Canadian Researchers Get Greater Reach for Their Research

Greater Reach for Your Research

"Greater Reach for Your Research" emphasizes the practical benefits of repositories--such as more exposure for researchers' articles, universal access to research literature, and long-term preservation. Citation research has shown that articles posted to a digital repository are cited more frequently than articles appearing only in journals. The "Greater Reach for Your Research" initiative features an eye-catching new brochure and matching Web portal, a slidecast on the importance of retaining copyright, the SPARC Canadian Author Addendum and updated brochure, and other resources--including a video interview with Ernie Ingles, Vice Provost and Chief Librarian at University of Alberta. See http://www.arl.org/sparc/partner/09-0309.shtml.

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8. MIT Announces Institutional Licensing Policy

The faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) voted unanimously on March 18 to adopt an open-access policy, which grants to MIT nonexclusive permission to make available their scholarly articles and to exercise the copyright in those articles for the purpose of open dissemination. In legal terms, each faculty member grants to MIT a nonexclusive, irrevocable, paid-up, worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to each of his or her scholarly articles, in any medium, provided that the articles are not sold for a profit, and to authorize others to do the same. Papers will be added to MIT's DSpace repository. This is the first faculty-led, university-wide policy in the United States. See http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2009/open-access-0320.html.

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9. University of Michigan Library Absorbs Press

The University of Michigan is restructuring its press and shifting its focus to the recruitment, production, and dissemination of primarily digital monographs. The change also includes a realignment of the press from a financially self-sustaining university unit to a department that reports to the dean of libraries, providing closer coordination between the press and the library’s Scholarly Publishing Office. See http://umichpress.typepad.com/university_of_michigan_pr/2009/03/um-redefining-scholarly-publications-in-the-digital-age.html.

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10. Texas A&M Releases Videos from Scholarly Communication Symposium

February 11–13, Texas A&M University hosted a symposium on "The Changing Landscape of Scholarly Communication in the Digital Age," which featured a range of national and regional speakers discussing the challenges and opportunities that new technologies provide for the dissemination of scholarship, including CNI Executive Director Clifford Lynch, who delivered a closing keynote address. Program topics included open access, the effects of new scholarly publishing models on the promotion and tenure process, and the role of university libraries as institutional repositories and facilitators for faculty scholarship. Information on the symposium and videos of selected presentations are available at http://futureofpublishing.tamu.edu/.

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11. LIS Editors Release Draft Statements of Ethics and Best Practices

A self-organized group of editors of library and information science (LIS) journals has released a public draft of a set of statements on ethics for editors, authors, and reviewers and best practices for editors. The draft will be finalized and released for the endorsement of individual LIS editors in conjunction with the group's next meeting in Chicago, July 10. The draft and information on the group are available at http://www.lis-editors.org/best-practices/.

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12. Journal of Biology Tries New Approach to Simplified Peer Review

Journal of Biology cover

The Journal of Biology is beginning an experimental policy that allows authors to opt out of the second stage of the traditional peer-review practice. Instead of asking referees to review a paper after revisions have been made, this BioMed Central journal will pass revised manuscripts directly to journal editors for the final review. During the experiment, editors will monitor issues regarding referee decisions on reviewing and quality of manuscripts. See http://www.researchinformation.info/news/news_story.php?news_id=437.

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13. Humanities Journals Struggle to Redefine Themselves

In the March 27 issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education, Jennifer Howard reports that traditional humanities journals are being impacted by evolving technology and habits of readers and authors. The article notes the recent drop in unsolicited submissions by senior scholars as well as the often-fragmented nature of online access. Howard interviewed editors of several leading humanities journals about their reactions to these changes. The article, "Humanities Journals Confront Identity Crisis," is available online at http://chronicle.com/weekly/v55/i29/29a00102.htm (login required).

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14. Academic Misconduct Discovered

An anesthesiology researcher, Scott Reuben of Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, Massachusetts, has been accused of research fraud by fabricating results of research and falsifying data for nearly 15 years. Some articles have already been retracted and others are being reviewed. The confirmed articles were published in Anesthesiology, Anesthesia, and Analgesia, the Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, and other titles. See http://www.anesthesiologynews.com/index.asp?section_id=3&show=dept&ses=ogst&issue_id=494&article_id=12634.

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15. ARL-ACRL Institute on Scholarly Communication Workshop, "Scholarly Communication Outreach," Draws 70

The ARL-ACRL Institute on Scholarly Communication workshop, "Scholarly Communication Outreach: Crafting Messages that Grab Faculty Attention," was held March 11–12 in Seattle, Washington, with 70 librarians in attendance. Jon Wergin, Professor of Educational Studies, Antioch University, facilitated the first program session and focused on researcher communication practices and skills for interviewing and listening. Group dinners provided an opportunity for participants to share experiences about developing their own scholarly communication programs. The second program session addressed message development and was led by Alane Wilson, Executive Director of the British Columbia Library Association. For more information, contact Julia Blixrud, jblix@arl.org.

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PUBLIC POLICIES AFFECTING RESEARCH LIBRARIES

16. US NIH Public Access Policy Made Permanent

On March 12, President Obama signed into law the 2009 Consolidated Appropriations Act, which includes a provision making the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy permanent. The NIH Public Access Policy mandates that investigators funded by NIH submit their peer-reviewed final manuscripts to PubMed Central, the National Library of Medicine online archive, where the manuscripts will be publicly accessible within 12 months after publication in a peer-reviewed journal. The congressional directive for the policy was included annually in the appropriations for NIH. Making the policy permanent follows many years of contentious debate about the efficacy of and need for the policy. For more information, see http://www.taxpayeraccess.org/media/Release09-0312.html.

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17. Obama Administration Budget Resolutions Approved

Prior to leaving for recess, the US House and Senate approved the outlines of the FY 2010 Obama administration budget request. The resolutions signal how much funding will be available for the 12 appropriations committees to allocate to agencies, departments, and programs. Overall, the administration has asked for $1.23 trillion in discretionary funding. There remains a significant gap between the House and Senate budget resolution numbers, with the House providing for $1.6 trillion and the Senate $1.1 trillion. A conference to resolve the differences in the House and Senate approaches will now be required. The administration's budget request is expected to be publicly available later in the spring. For more information, contact Prue Adler, prue@arl.org.

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18. ARL and ALA Call for Increase to NEH Budget

ARL and the American Library Association (ALA) submitted a statement in support of the FY 2010 appropriations for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), particularly the NEH Division of Preservation and Access. The ARL-ALA document states, "with NEH's support, libraries engage in numerous activities to preserve and provide access to our local, state, national and international cultural heritage. We also urge you to support the overall funding for NEH at the level of $230 million, an increase of $75 million. Additional appropriations would permit the Agency to address the high level of unmet needs by supporting a greater number of humanities projects. NEH funding is central to libraries across the country as this funding supports core activities including the preservation of unique collections, the training of librarians to preserve these culturally valuable resources, and to making important research tools broadly available for use by the public." The statement is available at http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/tstneh2010final.pdf.

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19. NARA Seeks Comment on Presidential Libraries and Presidential Records by April 17

NARA Presidential Libraries

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is seeking comment on cost-effective ways to modify the current system for archiving and providing public access to presidential records. Provisions in the Presidential Historical Records Preservation Act of 2008 require the Archivist to revisit three issues concerning presidential libraries: (1) reduce the financial burden on the federal government, (2) improve the preservation of presidential records, and (3) reduce the delay in public access to all presidential records. NARA is exploring a range of options, such as creating a single centralized depository for all records; separating presidential records from other presidential library functions, such as those that are museum-related; digitizing entire collections and making them available via the Internet with the original paper records and other media stored in "lower-cost caves;" and processing records systematically rather than under the Freedom of Information Act. Comments are due by April 17, 2009. More information is available via http://www.archives.gov/presidential-libraries/.

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20. FOIA Guidelines Revised by US Justice Department

On March 19, US Attorney General Eric Holder released revised Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) guidelines that detail how FOIA requests will be managed during the Obama administration. In January, President Obama signaled a significant departure from the previous administration's policy on the openness and transparency of government. A key element of the Obama administration policy is the position that disclosure of government records is now presumed and calls upon agencies to "readily and systematically post information online in advance of any public request." For more information and the guidelines themselves, see http://justice.gov/opa/pr/2009/March/09-ag-253.html.

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21. OPEN FOIA Act Introduced in US Senate

Two vocal Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) advocates, Senator Patrick Leahy (Chair, Senate Committee on the Judiciary, and D-VT) and Senator John Cornyn (R-TX), introduced the OPEN FOIA Act of 2009, S. 612. The legislation seeks to reduce the amount of government secrecy by limiting the number of instances where government records may be exempted from disclosure. It is not unusual for new FOIA exemptions to be included in proposed legislation, and oftentimes these new exemptions are enacted into law without ample understanding of how they would place new restrictions on government disclosure. For more information, see http://leahy.senate.gov/press/200903/031709c.html.

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22. Presidential Records Bill Moves Forward in Senate

On April 1, the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee approved the Presidential Records Reform Act of 2009. The full Senate is expected to consider the legislation later in April following the congressional recess. There are differences between the House and Senate legislation, which will require resolution following Senate passage. The House-passed legislation puts in place procedures to ensure the timely release of presidential records. There are a number of other key provisions in the legislation, including establishing deadlines for the review of records by the current and former presidents, limiting the authority of former presidents to withhold presidential records, granting authority to the sitting president to reject claims to withhold records by other presidents, limiting the right to claim executive privilege to current and former presidents and not to heirs or designees, and reversing the Bush Executive Order so that vice presidents cannot claim executive privilege over vice presidential records. For more information, contact Prue Adler, prue@arl.org.

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23. ARL and Others Urge Obama Administration to End Ideological Exclusion

With over 70 organizations, ARL joined in a letter to the US Attorney General and the Secretaries of State and Homeland Security requesting an end to the practice of "ideological exclusion," namely refusing visas to foreign scholars, writers, artists, and others. This practice bars individuals from the United States based on their ideas, political views, and associations, not on their actions. Dozens of prominent intellectuals have been barred from assuming teaching posts at US universities, fulfilling speaking engagements with US audiences, and attending academic conferences.

The joint letter notes, "while the government plainly has an interest in excluding foreign nationals who present a threat to national security, no legitimate interest is served by the exclusion of foreign nationals on ideological grounds. To the contrary, ideological exclusion impoverishes academic and political debate inside the United States. It sends the message to the world that our country is more interested in silencing than engaging its critics. It undermines our ability to support political dissidents in other countries. And it deprives Americans of a right protected by the First Amendment. No legitimate interest is served by the government's use of the immigration laws as instruments of censorship." The letter is accessible at http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/idex-coalition-letter-3-18-09.pdf.

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TRANSFORMING LIBRARY ROLES IN RESEARCH, TEACHING, AND LEARNING

24. Special Collections in ARL Libraries: Working Group Releases Discussion Report

The ARL Working Group on Special Collections, formed in 2007, has released a discussion report that identifies key issues in the management and exposure of special collections material in the 21st century. The report includes overviews of and recommendations in three areas: (1) Collecting Carefully, with Regard to Costs, and Ethical and Legal Concerns; (2) Ensuring Discovery and Access; and (3) The Challenge of Born-Digital Collections. The report highlights the need for research library leadership to support actions that will increase the visibility and use of special collections and promote both existing and developing best practices in the stewardship of special collections. The working group also invites discussion among the many professionals who are charged with the perplexing challenges of handling rare, unique or unusual material about the extraordinary challenges they face as collectors and stewards of special collections in libraries and archives in the 21st century. The report is freely available on the ARL Web site at http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/scwg-report.pdf.

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25. Special Collections Forum to Be Held October 15–16, 2009

In conjunction with its October 2009 membership meeting in Washington DC, ARL will host a forum on "Distinctive Collections in the Digital Age." Building on the popular format of last year's forum, "Reinventing Science Librarianship," the 2009 forum will begin the afternoon of October 15 and continue throughout the day on October 16. In addition to addressing emerging issues for traditional special collections, the forum will explore new kinds of born-digital resources that increasingly comprise the unique content collected by research libraries. The forum agenda and registration information will be released on the ARL Web site this summer. For more information, contact Karla Hahn, karla@arl.org.

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26. Reinventing Science Librarianship: ARL Publishes Report on 2008 Forum

Clifford Lynch, in RLI 262
Clifford Lynch

Themes from the ARL-CNI forum on "Reinventing Science Librarianship" held last October are highlighted in a recent article by Elisabeth Jones in ARL's Research Library Issues. Jones discusses (1) The Process of Reinventing Science Librarianship, (2) Serving Future Generations of Users, and (3) The Librarian as Middleware, along with the closing observations offered by CNI Executive Director Clifford Lynch. Lynch's closing remarks are also available as a podcast at http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/lynchexcerpt.mp3. The full article is freely available at http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/rli-262-science.pdf.

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27. University of Minnesota Releases New Version of Assignment Calculator

U of Minnesota Assignment Calculator

The University of Minnesota Libraries--working with the university's Center for Writing, Center for Teaching and Learning, and the Writing Studies Department--have developed an enhanced version of their popular Assignment Calculator. The new application, currently in beta testing, gives instructors and students greater control over their assignments and allows for seamless integration into courses. The original Assignment Calculator has been adopted by a range of institutions and is complemented by a Dissertation Calculator (http://www.lib.umn.edu/help/disscalc/). More information is available at http://blog.lib.umn.edu/jveldof/calculator/; see the new beta version of the application at https://tools.lib.umn.edu/ac/.

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28. Learning Spaces Are Focus of Special Issue of EDUCAUSE Review

The March/April issue of EDUCAUSE Review is devoted to a series of articles on learning spaces. Included are a piece by CNI's Joan Lippincott on increasing faculty involvement with space planning and a podcast and transcript of an interview with Lippincott and ARL's Crit Stuart, among other experts, on a long-term view for learning spaces. The issue is available at http://www.educause.edu/ER/ERVolume442009/EDUCAUSEReviewMagazineVolume44/163794.

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29. CNI Update

The Spring 2009 CNI Task Force Meeting was held in Minneapolis, April 6–7. An opening plenary address on digital preservation strategies was delivered by David Rosenthal of Stanford University; Patricia Cruse of the University of California and Sayeed Choudhury of Johns Hopkins University spoke about initiatives that are part of the National Science Foundation's DataNet program during the closing session. Details of the meeting are available at http://www.cni.org/tfms/2009a.spring/ and presentation materials will be added shortly.

CNI will co-sponsor the IS&T 2009 Archiving Conference, which will be held in Arlington, Virginia, May 4–7, 2009. Clifford Lynch will deliver a keynote address on May 7. Program details are available at http://www.imaging.org/conferences/archiving2009/.

CNI will also co-sponsor the 2009 International Digital Curation Conference, to be held in London December 2–4, 2009, and Clifford Lynch will serve as conference co-chair; for details, see http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/dcc-2009/.

Clifford Lynch was interviewed for a recent Library Journal article, "Institutional Repositories: Thinking beyond the Box," which appeared in the March 1, 2009, issue. See http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6639327.html.

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DIVERSITY, PROFESSIONAL WORKFORCE, AND LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

30. ARL Diversity Scholars to Visit Purdue University Libraries April 20–22

IRDW Diversity Scholars, January 2009

On April 20–22, Purdue University Libraries will host the Diversity Scholars of ARL's Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce (IRDW) for an on-site visit. The visit will give the Diversity Scholars--all current MLS students--an opportunity to learn more about the advanced operations of a research library and to discuss how libraries fit into the bigger picture of a large research institution. The scholars will attend structured meetings, informal sessions, receptions, tours of several campus libraries, and will have free time to explore the Purdue campus and surrounding area. The group will spend time with James Mullins, Dean of Libraries, as well as other library and university managers and administrators. This is the fifth time Purdue University Libraries has hosted this invaluable component of the IRDW. More information about the campus visits and the IRDW can be found at http://www.arl.org/diversity/init/visits.shtml.

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31. Leadership & Career Development Institute on Research, Teaching & Learning to Convene at Yale April 25–29

ARL's Leadership Career Development Program (LCDP) fellows will convene at Yale University April 25–29 for the LCDP's Research, Teaching, and Learning (RTL) Institute. The LCDP is an 18-month fellowship that prepares midcareer librarians from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups to take on increasingly demanding leadership roles in ARL libraries. The current cohort of 10 fellows will visit Yale and will participate in training programs, discussions, working sessions, and social events that aim to build community and provide training and guidance to the group regarding transforming library roles in RTL. More information about the LCDP and the fellows can be found at http://www.arl.org/diversity/lcdp/.

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LIBRARY STATISTICS AND ASSESSMENT

32. ARL Statistical Surveys and Publications Update

The status of the annual ARL statistical surveys and publications is as follows:

ARL Annual Salary Survey 2008–2009: Final tables are posted on the Web at http://www.arl.org/stats/annualsurveys/salary/sal0809.shtml; print publication is in production.

ARL Statistics, ARL Academic Health Sciences Library Statistics, ARL Academic Law Libary Statistics, ARL Supplementary Statistics, and ARL Preservation Statistics, 2007–2008: Data collection is almost complete--a couple of institutions have not submitted data yet; data verification is underway. Please promptly respond to data inquiries from ARL Statistics staff. Note that ARL institutions have ready access to the data that have been submitted through the interface powered by StatsQUAL® http://www.statsqual.org/.

ARL Preservation Statistics 2006–2007: Publication is in final production stages.

A meeting of ARL survey coordinators and SPEC liaisons is being planned for Friday, July 10, 2009, 3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m. in Chicago. Meeting participants will take a close look at the ARL Statistics data-entry interface and its capabilities and how ARL Statistics data-collection activity will relate to potential LibQUAL+® data-collection activities. For more information on the ARL Survey Coordinators and SPEC Liaisons Meetings, see http://www.arl.org/stats/annualsurveys/surveycoord/survcoordmtg.shtml.

For additional information on the annual statistical surveys, contact Martha Kyrillidou, martha@arl.org.

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33. ARL Statistics and Assessment Events at ALA Annual Conference, Chicago, July 2009

The ARL Statistics program, ClimateQUAL™, and LibQUAL+® will sponsor several events at the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference in Chicago in July:

Friday, July 10, 2009

9:00 a.m.–Noon
ClimateQUAL™ meeting
Project participants only
Location TBD
Contact: climatequal@arl.org

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
ARL Library Assessment Forum
Location TBD
Contact: Martha Kyrillidou

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
ARL Survey Coordinators and SPEC Liaisons Meeting
Location TBD
More information

Monday, July 13, 2009

8:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
LibQUAL+® Share Fair
Location TBD
More information & registration

11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Working Effectively with LibQUAL+®
Location TBD
More information & registration

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34. ClimateQUAL™ Launches New Web Site

ClimateQUAL screenshot

ARL has launched a new Web site for its latest assessment tool, ClimateQUAL™: Organizational Climate and Diversity Assessment, offered through the StatsQUAL® platform. The site aims to provide information and useful resources for past, current, and potential ClimateQUAL™ participants. ClimateQUAL™ is a joint project of the University of Maryland Industrial/Organizational Psychology Program and ARL. It is an internal survey that measures library staff perceptions of organizational climate and measures climate for teamwork, justice, and diversity. ClimateQUAL™ is designed to help libraries understand how organizational procedures and policies affect customer perception of service quality in a library setting. The survey results and follow-up improvement strategies can promote the development of a healthy organization. Healthy organizations provide consistent messages regarding policies and procedures to all employees; this consistency relates to improved customer perception of service quality. The ClimateQUAL™ site is on the Web at http://www.climatequal.org/.

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35. LibQUAL+® Lite Featured in Performance Measurement & Metrics

The latest issue of Performance Measurement & Metrics (PM&M) features an article on LibQUAL+® Lite, the most important development in LibQUAL+® of the past few years. LibQUAL+® Lite uses matrix sampling to collect data on all survey items without requiring every participant to react to every survey question. The PM&M article compares participation rates, completion times, and results across the two administration protocols--the traditional LibQUAL+® protocol and the LibQUAL+® Lite protocol--at each of four institutions. The article by Bruce Thompson, Martha Kyrillidou, Colleen Cook, "Item Sampling in Service Quality Assessment Surveys to Improve Response Rates and Reduce Respondent Burden: The 'LibQUAL+® Lite' Example," Performance Measurement & Metrics 10, no. 1 (2009): 6–16, is available online to subscribers at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/14678040910949657 (login required).

To learn more about current developments in LibQUAL+®, attend the LibQUAL+® Share Fair and/or the workshop on "Working Effectively with LibQUAL+®" at the ALA Annual Conference in Chicago on July 13. For more information and to register, visit http://www.libqual.org/Events/.

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36. Assessment Article Garners Praise

An article by Steve Hiller, Martha Kyrillidou, and Jim Self, "When the Evidence is Not Enough: Organizational Factors that Influence Effective and Successful Library Assessment," published in Performance Measurement & Metrics 9, no. 3 (2008): 223–230, is one of three articles highly commended by the journal's editorial team for 2008. The article is online at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/14678040810928444 (login required).

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OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST TO ARL DIRECTORS

37. ARL Publishes First E-Only Bimonthly Report, Research Library Issues

RLI 262 cover

ARL has published its first e-only bimonthly report, Research Library Issues (RLI), which now sports a new look and title. RLI is a continuation of the publication ARL: A Bimonthly Report on Research Library Issues from ARL, CNI, and SPARC. The first issue of RLI, no. 262 (February 2009), features two ARL statements—on the university’s role in the dissemination of research and scholarship, and on the global economic crisis—and an article by University of Washington’s Elisabeth Jones on "Reinventing Science Librarianship: Themes from the ARL-CNI Forum." In addition, ARL’s Martha Kyrillidou writes on "Redefining Serial Counts and Remaining Relevant in the 21st Century." RLI is freely available at http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/rli/.

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38. Grants

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has awarded $20 million in grants to 197 humanities projects, including 11 ARL libraries:

  • Buffalo, SUNY, $202,241 for "Reformatting and Cataloging Poetry Tapes"

  • Maryland, $400,000 for "The Text Image Linking Environment (TILE)" and $49,500 for "CAMP: The Collaborative Ajax-Based Modeling Platform"

  • Michigan, $250,000 for "Providing Access to Manuscript Collections Related to Early American History"

  • Missouri–Columbia, $6,000 for "Sister Novelists: The Lives and Writings of Jane and Anna Maria Porter"

  • New York Public Library, $312,900 for "The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture--Scholars in Residence Program"

  • New York University, $332,760 for "Pamphlets and Ephemera as Social and Cultural History: Preserving an Alternative Print Tradition at the Tamiment Library"

  • North Carolina at Chapel Hill, $50,000 for "Image to XML"

  • Oregon, $2,500 for "Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience--A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries"

  • Rochester, $273,820 for "Digitizing Public Domain Musical Scores and Books from the Sibley Music Library"

  • Syracuse, $350,000 for "Marcel Breuer, Architect: Life and Work, 1922–1955"

  • Texas at Austin, $196,137 for "Cataloging the Morris Ernst Collection"

For more information, see http://www.neh.gov/news/archive/20090309.html.

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39. ARL Transitions

British Columbia: Ingrid Parent has been appointed University Librarian, effective July 1, 2009. She is currently Assistant Deputy Minister for the Documentary Heritage Collection Sector at Library and Archives Canada.

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40. ARL Staff Transitions

Crit Stuart retired as Director, Research, Teaching, and Learning (RTL). Crit is relocating to San Diego to be near his family and plans to be available for short-term consultations. To lead the RTL program, Karla Hahn was appointed ARL Assistant Executive Director, Research, Teaching, and Learning. Karla was formerly Director, ARL Office of Scholarly Communication. To lead the Scholarly Communication program, Julia Blixrud was named ARL Assistant Executive Director, Scholarly Communication. Julia was formerly ARL Assistant Executive Director, External Relations, and SPARC Assistant Director, Public Programs. These changes in program leadership were effective April 1, 2009.

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41. Other Transitions

ALA Office for Diversity: Miguel A. Figueroa has been named Director of the American Library Association (ALA) Office for Diversity, effective May 5, 2009. Figueroa is currently Network Services Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine Middle Atlantic Region, Ehrman Medical Library, New York University Langone Medical Center. For more information, see http://www.ala.org/ala/newspresscenter/news/pressreleases2009/march2009/ofdfigueroa.cfm.

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4/9/09

Charles B. Lowry
Executive Director
Association of Research Libraries
21 Dupont Circle
Washington DC 20036
v: (202) 296-2296
fax: (202) 872-0884
e-mail: clowry@arl.org


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