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E-News for ARL Directors

Nov. 2008 E-News: Part 2

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E-News for ARL Directors is a collaboration of ARL program staff, compiled and edited by Charles Lowry (clowry@arl.org) and Kaylyn Groves (kaylyn@arl.org).

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Governance and Membership Activities

1. Future ARL Membership Meeting Dates

Scholarly Communication

2. Current Models of Digital Scholarly Communication: ARL Releases Final Report from Ithaka Study

3. HathiTrust Collaborative Digital Repository Pioneers New Roles for Research Libraries

4. SPARC Digital Repositories Meeting Draws Over 300 Participants

5. "Voices of Open Access" Video Series Released by PLoS and SPARC

6. Campus MovieFest Sponsors Sparky Awards; Judges Panel to Include New-Media Luminaries

7. SPARC's Advocacy Efforts: Heather Joseph Interviewed by Journal of Cell Biology

8. Patient Advocates Discuss Personal Impact of Access to Publicly Funded Research

Public Policies Affecting Research Libraries

9. Obama Transition: ARL Participates in Proposals and Recommendations for Incoming Administration

10. Open Letter to Next US President Advocates Open Access to Publicly Funded Research

11. US Government Appropriations Update

12. The Google Library Project Settlement: ARL and ALA Release Guide for Libraries

13. Fair Use and the Harry Potter Case: ARL and ALA Release Paper

Library Roles in Research, Teaching, and Learning

14. Learning Environments Derived from User-Centered Discovery Techniques: Webcast with ARL's Crit Stuart

15. Next Generation of Academics: A Report on a Study at the University of Rochester

16. Thinking Creatively about Video Assignments: A Conversation with Penn Faculty

17. "ATM of Books" Installed by University of Michigan Library

18. M-Libraries Conference: Call for Papers and Posters by Dec. 15, '08

19. CNI Fall 2008 Task Force Meeting: Roadmap and Project Briefing Schedule Now Online

20. Collaboration among Libraries, Archives, and Museums: OCLC RLG Reports on US & UK Workshops

21. Data Scientist & Curator Skills, Role, and Career Structure: JISC Releases Recommendations

Library Statistics and Assessment

22. ARL Statistical Surveys and Publications Update

23. Call for Participation: Effective, Sustainable, and Practical Library Assessment

24. F. W. Lancaster Festschrift Published by Library Trends, Edited by Lorraine Haricombe and Keith Russell

25. Evidence-Based Management Article Wins Award for Best Article in portal: Libraries and the Academy

Other Items of Interest to ARL Directors

26. Publications

27. ARL Transitions

28. ARL Staff Transitions

29. Other Transitions


GOVERNANCE AND MEMBERSHIP ACTIVITIES

1. Future ARL Membership Meeting Dates

The 2009 ARL Membership Meetings will be held May 20-22 in Houston and October 14-16 in Washington DC. Beginning in 2010, the spring meeting will be held earlier than it has been in the past in order to avoid conflict with commencement ceremonies. The 2010 ARL Membership Meeting dates are April 28-30 in Seattle and October 13-15 in Washington DC. A complete calendar of future Membership Meeting dates is available online http://www.arl.org/events/futuremms/.

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SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION

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2. Current Models of Digital Scholarly Communication: ARL Releases Final Report from Ithaka Study

ARL has released the final report from a study that the Association commissioned Ithaka to conduct, Current Models of Digital Scholarly Communication, by Nancy L. Maron and K. Kirby Smith, along with the database of exemplars that the study produced. In the spring of 2008, ARL engaged Ithaka’s Strategic Services Group to conduct an investigation into the range of online resources valued by scholars, paying special attention to those projects that are pushing beyond the boundaries of traditional formats and are considered innovative by the faculty who use them. The study's findings are based on a collection of resources identified by a volunteer field team of over 300 librarians at 46 academic institutions in North America who interviewed faculty members on their campuses about the digital scholarly resources they find most useful. The authors evaluated each resource gathered by the field team and conducted interviews of project leaders of 11 representative resources. The report profiles eight genres of resources, including discussion of how and why the faculty members reported using the resources for their work, how content is selected for the site, and what financial sustainability strategies the resources are employing. The report is freely available on the ARL Web site at http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/current-models-report.pdf. Search the database at http://www.arl.org/sc/models/model-pubs/search-form.shtml.

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3. HathiTrust Collaborative Digital Repository Pioneers New Roles for Research Libraries

A new digital archive that already contains scans of more than two million books has been announced: the HathiTrust is a collaborative effort of the libraries of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation and the University of California. Launched with the participants’ shared collections of book scans generated through their participation in the Google Book Search program, the digital repository is noteworthy for its scale and for its commitment to providing archival services, including long-term preservation. Access to public domain works in the collection is fully open while the project also supports more limited access that copyright or contract terms require for some other kinds of works. Participation in the project is open to additional partner libraries. More information on the project is available on its Web site http://www.hathitrust.org/.

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4. SPARC Digital Repositories Meeting Draws Over 300 Participants

Earlier this week, 330 librarians, researchers, funders, administrators, government officials, publishers, and technologists from around the world convened in Baltimore for the SPARC Digital Repositories Meeting 2008. Coming on the heels of two groundbreaking US developments--a vote by Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences enabling the university to offer access to their articles in an institutional repository and implementation of a new National Institutes of Health public access policy--as well as unprecedented advancement in the international sphere over the past year, the meeting enabled stakeholders to explore next steps for the burgeoning open archiving movement. The program highlighted four key areas: The Policy Environment, New Horizons, Campus Publishing Strategies, and Value-Added Services. These tracks were supplemented with an Innovation Fair, where new technologies, strategies, and approaches were featured, and a Practicum on marketing and advocacy. Video from the meeting will be posted on the SPARC Web site next week http://www.arl.org/sparc/.

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5. "Voices of Open Access" Video Series Released by PLoS and SPARC

voices-of-open-access-nov08.jpg

The new PLoS / SPARC "Voices of Open Access" video series presents interviews with a scientist, a funder, a graduate student, a teacher, a patient advocate, and a librarian who explain why open access matters to them. The series defines open access as a fundamental component of a new system for exchanging scholarly research results, where: health is transformed; research outputs are maximized to their fullest extent; efficiencies in the research process enable faster discoveries; the best science is made possible; young people are inspired; access transcends the wealth of the institution; cost savings are realized across the research process; and medical research conducted for the public good is made available to everyone who needs it. For more details and to view the videos, visit http://www.arl.org/sparc/media/08-1014.shtml.

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6. Campus MovieFest Sponsors Sparky Awards; Judges Panel to Include New-Media Luminaries

Campus MovieFest (CMF), the world's largest student film festival, is a new sponsor of the 2008 Sparky Awards, a contest that recognizes the best new short videos by students on the value of sharing information. As a sponsor, CMF will draw the attention of tens of thousands of student filmmakers to the Sparky Awards. The winner of the 2008 Sparky Awards will be screened at the CMF Southern Grand Finale in Spring 2009. SPARC has also announced that 2008 contest judges will include noted media experts:

  • Michael Wesch, the anthropologist whose innovative video explaining Web 2.0 has been viewed more than seven million times on YouTube;
  • Media scholar and filmmaker Kembrew McLeod, whose book and documentary film entitled Freedom of Expression®: Resistance and Repression in the Age of Intellectual Property have received broad critical acclaim; and
  • University of Pennsylvania cinema studies professor Peter Decherney, author of Hollywood and the Culture Elite: How the Movies Became American and leader of the 2006 petition for an exemption to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act for media professors to use clips in teaching.

Contest entries must be received by November 30, 2008. Winners will be announced in January 2009. For more information, see http://www.arl.org/sparc/media/08-1002.shtml.

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7. SPARC's Advocacy Efforts: Heather Joseph Interviewed by Journal of Cell Biology

The November 3 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology includes an interview with SPARC Executive Director Heather Joseph about promoting SPARC's message of "opening access to research" to students, faculty, researchers, and policy makers. Download the article from http://jcb.rupress.org/cgi/reprint/183/3/368.

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8. Patient Advocates Discuss Personal Impact of Access to Publicly Funded Research

The Alliance for Taxpayer Access introduces Perspectives, a Web series that presents patient advocates' views on the enduring and often personal importance of public access to taxpayer-funded research in individual lives. See http://www.taxpayeraccess.org/perspectives/.

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PUBLIC POLICIES AFFECTING RESEARCH LIBRARIES

9. Obama Transition: ARL Participates in Proposals and Recommendations for Incoming Administration

right-to-know.jpg
Copyright © OMB Watch

With a variety of different partners and organizations, ARL is participating in numerous proposals for the incoming Obama administration concerning government information, transparency and accountability of government, privacy, and national security and secrecy. With the National Security Archive and others, ARL proposes restoring openness and effectiveness to the Freedom of Information Act, proposes changes to the classification and declassification system of government, and calls for greater compliance with laws governing presidential records, http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/news/20081112/index.htm. ARL joins with others in supporting many recommendations and proposals included in the Constitution Project’s “Liberty and Security: Recommendations for the Next Administration and Congress,” http://2009transition.org/liberty-security/. Finally, with others in the Right to Know community, ARL endorses recommendations in the report, Moving toward a 21st Century Right-to-Know Agenda: Recommendations to President-Elect Obama and Congress, http://www.ombwatch.org/article/archive/551.

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10. Open Letter to Next US President Advocates Open Access to Publicly Funded Research

Two days before the US presidential election, SPARC Senior Researcher Peter Suber published an open letter to the next president in which he argues that "[a] national commitment to make the non-classified results of federally-funded research freely available online would be good for research, good for the economy, good for taxpayers, and good for your own high-priority plans and policies." Suber details how open access would complement other policies discussed during the campaign and how it needs to be protected from special interests attempting to block it. Read the letter online at http://www.arl.org/sparc/publications/articles/an-open-letter-to-the-next-president-of-the-united.shtml.

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11. US Government Appropriations Update

US House and Senate appropriators have decided to draft an omnibus appropriations bill combining the individual appropriations measures (e.g., Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies, which includes NEH, and Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, which includes NIH) not yet passed but included in the Continuing Resolution passed in October. (The Continuing Resolution funds most federal agencies until early March 2009.) The goal is for the new Congress to consider the new omnibus measure in January 2009. Appropriators are trying to complete work on this omnibus bill by December 15, 2008. For more information, contact Prue Adler prue@arl.org.

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12. The Google Library Project Settlement: ARL and ALA Release Guide for Libraries

ARL and ALA have released “A Guide for the Perplexed: Libraries and the Google Library Project Settlement,” by Jonathan Band, JD. The guide is designed to help the library community better understand the terms and conditions of the recent settlement agreement between Google, the Authors Guild, and the Association of American Publishers concerning Google’s scanning of copyrighted works. Band notes that the settlement is extremely complex and presents significant challenges and opportunities to libraries. The guide outlines and simplifies the settlement’s provisions, with special emphasis on the provisions that apply directly to libraries. The guide and related materials are available from the ARL Web site at http://www.arl.org/pp/ppcopyright/google/.

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13. Fair Use and the Harry Potter Case: ARL and ALA Release Paper

arl-br-260.jpg

ARL and ALA recently released "How Fair Use Prevailed in the Harry Potter Case, by Jonathan Band, JD. Band contends that, despite US District Court Judge Robert Patterson’s September 8 ruling that the print version of Steven Vander Ark’s Harry Potter Lexicon infringed J. K. Rowling’s copyright, “the big winner actually was fair use.” Band draws three broad lessons from Judge Patterson’s decision. First, fair use is alive and well—expression can be incorporated into transformative works, as long as the expression is reasonably necessary for achieving the transformative purpose. Second, the courts champion fair use, in contrast to historic and recent proposed legislation that continues to encroach on fair use and the public domain. Third, fair use is best defended when those being sued have the resources to take on plaintiffs with deep pockets backed by big industry. The Lexicon’s publisher was fortunate to have support from the Fair Use Project of Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. Band notes that such public interest “law firms” play a critical role in leveling the copyright-litigation playing field. “How Fair Use Prevailed in the Harry Potter Case” was published in the October issue of the ARL Bimonthly Report and is available online via http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/br/br260.shtml.

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LIBRARY ROLES IN RESEARCH, TEACHING, AND LEARNING

14. Learning Environments Derived from User-Centered Discovery Techniques: Webcast with ARL's Crit Stuart

Crit Stuart of ARL joined host Steve Worona as the special guest in today’s EDUCAUSE Live! Web seminar, discussing “A Space of One’s Own: Learning Environments Derived from User-Centered Discovery Techniques.” This free Web seminar reviews a number of user-centered programming assessment techniques for developing innovative learning spaces for students. The techniques are field-tested, easy to modify and extemporize on, and reliable in producing excellent data for constructing informed building programs. To view the webcast archive, visit http://net.educause.edu/live0823.

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15. Next Generation of Academics: A Report on a Study at the University of Rochester

The University of Rochester has released a report of a study they conducted to develop a suite of authoring tools for integration into an institutional repository. The investigation, which was supported by funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), centered on PhD students who are completing their dissertations. In the course of the study, the investigators arrived at a number of insights regarding PhD student research behaviors that appear to have exceeded their expectations. These insights are substantiated by abundant quotes from students who were interviewed. In the investigators’ view:

“The graduate students we interviewed navigate large bodies of literature using any tools they can find…to the best of their abilities, often risking technology failure or experiencing the limits of their proficiency and knowledge. They turn to each other for help but rarely do they seek help from library professionals, preferring to rely on themselves or on whatever help their supervisors give them. Their work-related needs are many, offering the library a range of opportunities to help, if we can offer that help in such a way that they will see its value and accept it.”

The report summarizes the overarching study, describes research methodology, reviews findings, and presents a number of applications, some already completed or in progress. The full report is available via https://urresearch.rochester.edu/handle/1802/6053.

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16. Thinking Creatively about Video Assignments: A Conversation with Penn Faculty

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Copyright © 2006 Candace di Carlo

The staff of the Weigle Commons at the University of Pennsylvania’s Van Pelt Dietrich Library Center have created eight short video interviews (total duration: 33 minutes) to explore faculty experiences with teaching classes that include video assignments. The five faculty interviewees represent law, English and cinema studies, anthropology, urban studies, and critical writing. Participants explore assignment design, assessment, project structure, and other pedagogical aspects of student-created movies as class assignments. While these testimonials represent a broad range of academic disciplines and approaches to incorporating video assignments into class work, the cumulative effect is to see how extensively and effectively video production is becoming a part of the instruction landscape. The interviews are available online http://wic.library.upenn.edu/mashup/facvideo.html.

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17. "ATM of Books" Installed by University of Michigan Library

In a move that overcomes time delays associated with obtaining full copies of difficult-to-acquire books, the University of Michigan Library has installed an Espresso Book Machine® to facilitate the printing of any digitized book in the library's collections. Printing a book requires 5–7 minutes on average and costs $10. The Espresso’s manufacturer, On Demand Books, hopes to create a network of machines in libraries and bookshops throughout the world. See the On Demand Books Web site for a short video and description of how this modern printing service works http://www.ondemandbooks.com/home.htm.

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18. M-Libraries Conference: Call for Papers and Posters by Dec. 15, '08

The Second International m-libraries Conference, to be held in Vancouver, June 23-24, 2009, is seeking papers and posters; the submission deadline is December 15, 2008. The conference will explore and share work carried out in libraries around the world to deliver services and resources to users “on the move” via mobile or handheld devices, including mobile phones and smartphones, PDAs, portable gaming devices, MP3 players, and e-book readers. Researchers, technical developers, managers, and library practitioners will come together to exchange experience and expertise and generate ideas for future developments. The University of British Columbia (UBC) will host the conference in collaboration with Athabasca University, the Open University (UK), and Thompson Rivers University. To submit an abstract or learn more about the conference, see http://library.open.ac.uk/mLibraries/2009/callforpapers.html or e-mail Joan Lippincott, CNI Associate Executive Director and member of the Conference Organizing Committee, joan@cni.org.

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19. CNI Fall 2008 Task Force Meeting: Roadmap and Project Briefing Schedule Now Online

CNI Executive Director Clifford Lynch's guide to the December 8–9 Task Force Meeting in DC is now online, along with the schedule of project briefings to be delivered at the meeting. "Cliff's Roadmap" is available at http://www.cni.org/tfms/2008b.fall/roadmap.html and the schedule is at http://www.cni.org/tfms/2008b.fall/schedule.html. Links from the schedule lead to session abstracts. Supplemental information is being posted as it becomes available.

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20. Collaboration among Libraries, Archives, and Museums: OCLC RLG Reports on US & UK Workshops

oclc-silos-lams.jpg
Copyright © OCLC Online Computer Library Center Inc.

OCLC’s RLG Programs office has released a report, Beyond the Silos of the LAMs: Collaboration among Libraries, Archives, and Museums, which highlights lessons learned from five workshops held at RLG partner institutions in the US and the UK, and contains information about inspiring collaborative projects in campus environments. The workshops set out to: (1) explore the nature of library, archive, and museum collaborations; (2) help LAMs collaborate on common services and thus yield greater productivity within their institutions; and (3) assist them in creating research environments better aligned with user expectations in order to move beyond the "silos" of LAM resources, which divide content into piecemeal offerings.

Five institutions identified for their advanced work in creating genuine collaborations among LAMs were engaged in the workshops: the University of Edinburgh, Princeton University, the Smithsonian Institution, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and Yale University. Identical workshops held at each institution began with broad discussions, narrowed to the creation of scenarios for collaborations, and ultimately focused on the identification of discrete projects proposed by workshop attendees. By the end of the workshop series, ten projects had been proposed by the five sites.

The findings presented in the report represent information, ideas, and perceptions gleaned from the workshops. Among the processes explored are: transitions to a user point of view; thinking about improved services and outcomes; central, trusted digital repositories to safeguard digital content; centralized systems for exposing all LAM collections; social tagging systems that “absorb community knowledge”; and workflow and policy considerations to gain new efficiencies and combine assets--all of which contribute to an ideal scenario of moving toward true collaboration and a convergence of common services and functions.

The report is available online http://www.oclc.org/programs/news/2008-09-26.htm.

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21. Data Scientist & Curator Skills, Role, and Career Structure: JISC Releases Recommendations

The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) has released a study that makes recommendations on the role and career development of data scientists and the supply of specialist data-curation skills to the research community. This study addresses two recommendations from a 2007 JISC report by Liz Lyon on data management in the UK. Recommendations of the new study include: nationally coordinating research funders and research institutions to formalize the role of data scientists; creating conditions that support data science and foster its study and professionalization; and commissioning research that characterizes the roles played by data scientists, with examples of data science careers and good practices. Implications for the UK research library community are that they “should work with universities and research institutes to define…and formalize the role of data librarians, and develop a curriculum that ensures a suitable supply of librarians skilled in data handling.” See the report, "Skills, Role & Career Structure of Data Scientists & Curators: Assessment of Current Practice & Future Needs," http://www.jisc.org.uk/publications/publications/dataskillscareersfinalreport.aspx.

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LIBRARY STATISTICS AND ASSESSMENT

22. ARL Statistical Surveys and Publications Update

The status of the annual ARL statistical surveys and publications is as follows:

  • ARL Annual Salary Survey 2008-09: Surveys are currently being received. Please respond to our follow-up queries--we are attempting to collect all the data by Thanksgiving. To submit your data, see http://www.arl.org/stats/annualsurveys/salary/salform08.shtml.

  • ARL Statistics, ARL Academic Law Library Statistics, and ARL Academic Health Sciences Library Statistics 2006–07: Final publication tables are in production.

  • ARL Preservation Statistics 2006–07: Publication is in production.

  • 2007–08 ARL Statistics surveys are being prepared: We are working on rolling out an enhanced system that allows libraries to access data as they are being submitted. Access to earlier years' machine-readable data files will also be available through the ARL Statistics system (http://www.arlstatistics.org/). Streamlined changes for "serials titles received" are being incorporated as recommended by the ARL Statistics and Assessment Committee members (for details see attachments D1 and D2 to the October 15 committee meeting agenda http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/agenda_oct_2008.pdf).

We are scheduling a teleconference for Survey Coordinators that will feature the work of the Ad Hoc Task Force on Best Practices for Counting Serial Titles. The teleconference will take place on December 10, 2008, at 1:00 p.m. eastern time.

For additional information on the annual surveys, contact Martha Kyrillidou martha@arl.org.

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23. Call for Participation: Effective, Sustainable, and Practical Library Assessment

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Jim Self and Steve Hiller

ARL invites libraries to participate in its Effective, Sustainable, and Practical Library Assessment service in 2009. Visiting Program Officers Steve Hiller (University of Washington Libraries) and Jim Self (University of Virginia Library) are working with Martha Kyrillidou (ARL) to assist libraries in developing effective, sustainable, and practical assessment programs that demonstrate the libraries’ contributions to teaching, learning, and research. The service involves a site visit to each participating library, a report to each library with recommendations on practical and sustainable assessment, and follow-up assistance in implementing the recommendations. This service is available to all libraries interested in enhancing their assessment activities. The cost for participation is $4,000 plus travel expenses for the two project leaders. Libraries interested in participating should contact Martha Kyrillidou martha@arl.org. For more information, see http://www.arl.org/stats/initiatives/esp/.

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24. F. W. Lancaster Festschrift Published by Library Trends, Edited by Lorraine Haricombe and Keith Russell

Library Trends has published a special issue, edited by Lorraine Haricombe and Keith Russell, that is dedicated to F. W. Lancaster for his many contributions to library education, indexing and abstracting, measurement and evaluation. Martha Kyrillidou and Colleen Cook contributed an article on "The Evolution of Measurement and Evaluation of Libraries: A Perspective from the Association of Research Libraries." Kyrillidou and Cook posit that, in investigating historical interconnections, not only can we gain an understanding of how we arrived at today's world of evaluation in libraries, but we also can gain a glimpse into future developments in the field. They report, "Collaborative, organic, and lifelong evaluation approaches to organizational and personal learning are some of the ways we can describe the latest generation of evaluation tools and their evolutionary development." Abstracts of the articles in the issue are freely available online and the full text is available to Project MUSE subscribers at http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/library_trends/toc/lib.56.4.html.

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25. Evidence-Based Management Article Wins Award for Best Article in portal: Libraries and the Academy

The 2008 Johns Hopkins University Press Award for Best Article in portal: Libraries and the Academy has been awarded to "Evidence-Based Library Management: The Leadership Challenge," written by Amos Lakos. The article addresses the use of data in decision making in libraries--focusing on the role of leadership in making evidence-based decision making a reality--and reviews new opportunities for data analysis, assessment delivery, and decision making in libraries. The discussion is informed by a range of new products and services designed to assist decision makers and by interviews conducted by the author with over 20 library directors, mostly from ARL member libraries. The article appeared in portal 7, no. 4 (October 2007) and is online at http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/7.4lakos.pdf.

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OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST TO ARL DIRECTORS

26. Publications

ARL: A Bimonthly Report, no. 259 (August 2008)
Features "PubMed Central Deposit and Author Rights" by Ben Grillot, "ARL Salary Survey Highlights" by Les Bland, and brief summaries of ARL’s new Career Enhancement Program for minority MLS Students and the Library Assessment Conference held in Seattle, August 4-7, 2008.
http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/br/br259.shtml

ARL: A Bimonthly Report, no. 260 (October 2008)
Features "On Ensuring that Intellectual Property Policy Promotes Progress" by Peter McPherson, "How Fair Use Prevailed in the Harry Potter Case" by Jonathan Band, and "On the Need for a New, Open Access, Online Directory of Special Collections" by Jeffrey Makala with a response by Alice Prochaska.
http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/br/br260.shtml

ARL Annual Salary Survey 2007-08
Martha Kyrillidou, Mark Young, and Jason Barber, comps. and eds. 2008 * ISBN 1-59407-809-2 * 116 pages
http://www.arl.org/stats/annualsurveys/salary/arl-annual-salary-survey-2007-08.shtml

learning-space-tool-kit.jpg

ARL Learning Space Pre-Programming Tool Kit
Crit Stuart, October 2008
http://www.arl.org/news/pr/learning-space-tool-kit-14oct08.shtml

Current Models of Digital Scholarly Communication
Nancy L. Maron and K. Kirby Smith, November 2008
http://www.arl.org/sc/models/model-pubs/pubstudy/index.shtml
See item # 2 above.

“A Guide for the Perplexed: Libraries and the Google Library Project Settlement”
Jonathan Band, November 2008
http://www.arl.org/pp/ppcopyright/google/index.shtml
See item # 12 above.

SPEC-kit-307.jpg

Manuscript Collections on the Web, SPEC Kit 307
Donnelly Lancaster Walton
October 2008 * ISBN 1-59407-806-8 * 198 pp.
http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/spec/complete.shtml

Promoting the Library, SPEC Kit 306
Brian Mathews and Jon Bodnar
September 2008 * ISBN 1-59407-805-X * 196 pp.
http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/spec/complete.shtml

Proceedings of the 153rd ARL Membership Meeting, October 15-16, 2008
http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/mmproceedings/153mm-proceedings.shtml

Reinventing Science Librarianship: Models for the Future
Proceedings from the ARL / CNI Fall Forum, October 16-17, 2008
http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/fallforumproceedings/forum08proceedings.shtml

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27. ARL Transitions

Boston College: Thomas B. Wall has been named University Librarian, effective March 1, 2009. He is currently Associate University Librarian and Director of Public Services at Duke University.

National Agricultural Library (NAL): Peter Young resigned as NAL Director to take the position of Chief of the Asian Division at the Library of Congress. Eleanor Frierson, NAL Deputy Director, was appointed NAL Acting Director. Both transitions were effective October 31, 2008.

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28. ARL Staff Transitions

Henry Gross joined the ARL staff as Applications Developer, Statistics & Measurement, effective October 28, 2008. Henry holds a degree in computer science from Carleton College.

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29. Other Transitions

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH): Chairman Bruce Cole announced his departure from NEH to become the President and CEO of the American Revolution Center, effective January 2009. Cole became NEH Chairman in 2001 and promoted a number of programs during his tenure, including We the People, Picturing America, and establishment of the Office of Digital Humanities.

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11/21/08

Charles B. Lowry
Executive Director
Association of Research Libraries
21 Dupont Circle
Washington DC 20036
v: (202) 296-2296
fax: (202) 872-0884
e-mail: clowry@arl.org


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